By on June 16, 2015

delorean-erstbesitz-mr-delorean-baujahr-1982-1

Should you happen to be in Berlin next Friday, you could have a shot at the DeLorean once owned by none other than the former Mrs. DeLorean herself.

German auction house Auctionata is putting this particular bit of history on the block in Berlin June 26, Autoblog reports, a gift bestowed by the late John DeLorean in 1982 to his then-wife, actor/model/presenter Cristina Ferrare.

Following the collapse of the company and the marriage, Ferrare sold the DeLorean to its then-new owner in the United States, ultimately garnering 13,540 miles in the three decades it has been on the road.

Bidding for this DeLorean is set to start at €34,000 (around $38,000 USD), though the auction house expects the vehicle to leave the block for anywhere between €70,000 and €100,000 (~$79,000 and $112,000).

Said expectation is in line with the highest price paid for the iconic vehicle: a 1976 prototype sold by Canadian house RM Auctions left the block at Pebble Beach for $110,000 in 2007 ($128,000 in 2015 dollars).

[Photo credit: Auctionata]

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12 Comments on “DeLorean Owned By Mrs. DeLorean Goes On The Auction Block...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Cool.

  • avatar
    360joules

    A college friend’s father had a DeLorean and drove it frequently but not daily. At 6’4″, I had to do a sideways scuttle like a crab to duck under the door opening and then stretch my leg over the wide door sill. Once inside, I had decent room and felt comfortable. Body integrity was good, not creaky, but that engine while a moaner seemed torquey at launch but not “quick.” Another friend had a Volvo 265 and the same engine seemed more fun in the Volvo compared to the DeLorean. I don’t know how the crash tests rated the DeLorean but in 1989 I felt I was riding in something better armored than an S-Class.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    This car is probably in better shape than some of the other beaters out there. It’s a good investment, sure to improve with time.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    Interesting period piece but I could give two hoots about who the original owner was. I never found that car appealing, but more power to DeLorean for taking a shot at becoming an automaker.

  • avatar

    For a well-heeled DeLorean fan, $100K is impulse purchase money. Having been owned by JZD and his wife makes it effectively a one of one car.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Any hidden drug smuggling cubbies, by chance?

  • avatar
    WhiskeyRiver

    In today’s marketplace, a DeLorean, regardless of provenance, has about as much chance at bringing 100k at auction as it does achieving 88 MPH in a mall parking lot.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    She was a very glamorous woman when they were first married, and he was considerably older than her. She visited the factory in Ireland with him once, early on. All the workers were just staring at her and not much else.

    The couple were supposed to live in a house near the factory that John ordered built, but there was a work stoppage/riot after its completion, and it was partially damaged. They never moved in, nor did she visit the site after that initial time.

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