By on April 28, 2015

Ford Shelby GT350

In Los Angeles and Detroit, Ford took the covers off their two track-ready Mustangs – the GT350 and GT350R.

And Ford is only going to build 137 of them for 2015. Ehh?

What we’re driving this week:

Only two of us have press vehicles this week and both are full-size sedans, albeit aimed at very different consumers.

  • Alex Dykes is driving around in the brand new 2015 Dodge Charger R/T
  • Mark Stevenson (that’s me) is cruising in the top-trim 2015 Toyota Avalon Limited
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38 Comments on “While You Were Sleeping: 137 Shelbys, Eight Cylinder Porsches and One Lost Car...”


  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    “Ford is only going to build 137 of them for 2015”

    WTF?!?

    So I have to wait for something else above the Mustang GT? There better be a Mach 1 or something.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Don’t worry, you’ll get more for 2016. The program was delayed due to powertrain PPAP issues. Essentially, the supply base was ready to go to production by now but a program hold gave you this situation with wonderful PR spin. Who knows what the culprit was?

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I just know the convertible was a PITA for some people, but it never really caused a delay.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        And Tres, I wouldn’t mind something below the GT350 and above the GT. If Ford rolled out a special edition, like the Boss 302, with a bumped up 5.0 and some other cool stuff, I’d probably buy that.

        For me, it’s really going to depend on pricing. I have a fear that I won’t be able to touch a GT350 for under $60K. Since the GT350 won’t be A-plan eligible, the cost different between it and the regukar GT is huge. It may be $20K or more in real life.

    • 0 avatar
      Nicholas Weaver

      All this says is “the 2016 model year is coming out 1 day after the 2015 model year GT350s are delivered to the overpaying suckers”…

      A great way to push the production to the 2016 MY without having to say “we’re delaying the GT350 to the 2016 model year”.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I really like the new Mustang. I hope it’s build quality is better than what Ford in the US currently produces. It even has IRS and not a truck suspension!

    I can’t wait to see what Ford Performance Vehicles in Australia will do with the Mustang.

    I’d like to see the US V8 donated to a junk yard and the Aussie designed Ford Miami V8 used.

    As for the suspension, well, I’d like to see HSV get involved. Maybe with GMH moving off shore HSV can use some of their know how to improve the handling.

    The engine output has the ability to be lifted significantly with the use of an intercooler. 500hp+??? I don’t know, but it is 100lbs lighter than the Coyote.

    Here’s an older article on the Miami V8, looks like a great engine. It’s an engine that isn’t used outside of Australia. Maybe Ford in the US could use this engine.

    http://www.themotorreport.com.au/50776/2011-fpv-gs-and-gt-details-of-supercharged-miami-v8-revealed

    • 0 avatar
      Exfordtech

      I’m not sure that it’s 100# lighter than the Coyote, but it is 103# lighter than the outgoing 5.4l:

      “The new supercharged Miami 5.0 engine is 103 lbs lighter and more compact than the outgoing 5.4 liter Boss 315 (420hp) engine. The Australian 5.0 engines are assembled down under with components imported from the States as well as locally sourced parts. Internal components such as the pistons, rods, and camshaft profiles are unique the the Australian Miami 5.0. Additionally, the Harrop-Eaton supercharger system, accessory drive and exhaust manifolds are made in Australia.”

      Quoted from:

      http://www.themustangnews.com/content/2010/09/australian-supercharged-5-0-miami-v8-details/#.VT-lvyFViko

      Do you have a source regarding the 100# difference from the Coyote? 100# is a lot of weight. How did they achieve this?

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Exfordtech,
        I do think you’re correct. The 5.4 weighs 100lbs more.

        The supercharging development was primarily done in the UK as well.

        I did read an article that the engine might only be good for 380hp over a sustained period of time. It will develop more, but I don’t how reliable the engine would be.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The Miami engine is basically the same weight as the Coyote because it starts life as the Coyote. It has different intake and exhaust systems and a supercharger. It weighs 100 lbs less than the 5.4L. The DOHC 5.4L weights 550 lbs, or more, depending on the set up. You can buy a base Ford Racing Coyote from Ford. That weighs about 440 lbs.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @BAFO – If you think the outgoing Mustang’s suspension had anything in common with a truck, you should stick to arguing economics and chicken taxes, which you know absolute zero about.

      IRS won’t do much to improve the Mustang GT on the street, but it’ll seriously slow it down at the track.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The IRS makes it much better on the street. MUCH BETTER. I drove a 2014 GT and 2015 GT back to back.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          It’s improved in many respects, but are the shocks, bushings and sway bars similar enough to say its the separation of the wheels? I’m sure the ride is still fairly choppy by nature, so I don’t see a real good reason to sacrifice all-out performance. It’s not a Lincoln (yet!)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            All I know is that I didn’t get axle hop on the new one. You are right that it’s no Lincoln, but I find it to be much more livable. I know a few guys that traded in their pre-5.0L GTs for the Ecoboost model. The general consensous, from Mustang guys I talk to, is that the ’15 has much better road manners. I don’t know anyone that has tracked theirs yet.

            I can’t say if the defining viarable of the 2015 being more comfortable than the 2014 is the IRS vs SRA. However, I feel the same way about the Expedition vs Tahoe. The IRS in the Expedition gives a much better ride.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s safe to say the ’15 Mustang GT is slower at the track than the ’14, if all else is similar. It was supposed to give the Boss 302 a run for it’s money, but that’s clearly not happening.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Axle Hop has been a bigger problem for IRS, but more caused by poor or worn bushing, than anything else. Yeah I suspect the ride is marginally better, especially on torn up roads, but likely a less dramatic difference than stated. I’d expect to be underwhelmed.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I wouldn’t expect a miracle. It’s like a 2014 that is more comfortable, heavier, and has a nicer interior.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      “Here’s an older article on the Miami V8, looks like a great engine. It’s an engine that isn’t used outside of Australia. Maybe Ford in the US could use this engine.”

      Pretty sure this is a 5.0 coyote crate motor some company supercharges. Hardly qualifies as “Aussie Designed”. If that’s the case then I designed the supercharged 1.6 in my Miata since I put the blower on it in my garage.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Cops need to do more bait cars, lock up the criminals for 15 years and make money selling the videos. Win-win

    It’s hard not to leave keys in vehicles, that’s something else I have to carry around, just leave them in it and I never lose them.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      o_O

    • 0 avatar

      I know you have a lot of vehicles, but I disagree with that solution. A lot of insurance companies can and will deny your theft claim if they find out you left the keys in the car and the car unsecured, because that’s a lack of care on your part in avoiding a car theft. Likewise (I don’t know if this applies to you, but), if your under-16 kid had a sleepover and he and his friends went into the unlocked garage, then stole your car, with the keys left in it, and seriously injured themselves, the other parents would sue you…and win…because you were negligent in securing your keys from a bunch of adolescents without licenses. No one has any right to touch your car without your permission, but (unless you drive a 80s/90s Honda) you could avoid most car thefts by taking care to secure your keys.

      And bait cars are stupid.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I don’t leave them in at Wal-mart, mall, anywhere Raleigh-Durham, but on my own property its not really a concern. Hopefully by the time the kids are old enough, they’ll know better than that, I certainly knew what would happen when I was young if I screwed up.

        • 0 avatar
          Jellodyne

          You keep hoping that. Don’t worry, their brains will probably start functioning correctly around age 25 or so.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Well, they have a few years, I do my best to not be one of those oblivious parents that can’t fathom their child(ren) doing wrong. Some parents expect their children to raise themselves which is disgusting.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Keys/fobs are so expensive and a PITA when they get misplaced/lost/damaged, that it’s better to leave them in the car 24/7. Car thieves have to be checking for unlocked cars, looking for keys/fobs or simply hitting the starter button for a FREE car.

    But I’m guilty of leaving my keys in the truck or leaving it warming up in the driveway. Plus I’m lazy so I’ll leave it running while in the convenience store/ gas station. Or I’ll leave it running while in the bank or store with the heat or AC on when I have the dogs with me.

    But I’m about to install a hidden GPS tracker. Ridiculously cheap and almost free, compared to what cars/trucks cost. It’s hard to believe they’re not standard equipment and built into the car’s instrument cluster or main computer. Or both!

    • 0 avatar

      My new car has Volkswagen’s telematics system (Car Net), which includes Stolen Vehicle Assistance. Unfortunately, Car Net can’t cut the ignition like GM’s OnStar can, but it can provide law enforcement with a live feed of the car’s location. I’d rather just not have it stolen in the first place, though, so I’m not willing to risk leaving the key in the car, especially since it’s a smart key and can be left on my person.

      As far as the actual GPS, I’m not sure where it’s located. It might be located in the radio unit (which is in the glovebox), since the car has navigation, but Car Net is available in cars that don’t have navigation…so maybe the module is somewhere in the roof?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It’s only a matter of time until your smart key goes into the wash with your pants. But how is an OnStar car smart enough to know it’s being stolen but too dumb to prevent it?

        • 0 avatar

          I hope not! That’d be expensive.

          As far as OnStar Stolen Vehicle Assistance goes, it’d be like so:

          So imagine that you *do* leave your truck warming up in the driveway, unlocked. Some juvenile delinquent decides he no longer wants to ride the school bus and steals your truck. The truck has a valid key. The truck doesn’t know the driver is unauthorized, and until they start using biometric access in cars, there’s no way that it *would* know an authorized driver from an unauthorized one. When you contact OnStar and report the vehicle stolen, they can work with the police to determine its location. If it’s been vacated somewhere, OnStar can locate it and prevent it from being restarted. But let’s say that OnStar locates the vehicle in transit, on a highway somewhere. OnStar will remain on the phone with the police, who will determine when it’s safe to give OnStar the all-clear to cut the throttle, slowing the truck to a stop and preventing a high-speed chase and damage to your truck, as well as injury to others.

          But if the car actually determines that someone is trying to gain unauthorized access, it will probably disable the fuel pumps and ignition or something.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          I jumped into the Fairmont BC hot springs with my key fob in my swim shorts pocket. Good news, GM ones at least are waterproof.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Companies have been offering LSx, full conversion kits for 911s for some time now. Not only a considerably less weight V8 (aluminum LS), than the turbo 6, but lower center of gravity too, thanks to lower mounted accessories.

    http://www.renegadehybrids.com/911/LS-1.html

  • avatar
    ClutchCarGo

    I wonder what percentage of the cars stolen with keys left in the vehicle are actually insurance fraud by the owner?

    • 0 avatar

      Probably quite a few. Obviously you don’t tell the insurance company this, because they’ll deny your claim since you could have easily prevented it from being “stolen”. But if they locate the vehicle and the data modules are still operational, it won’t be hard to determine how it was accessed and started.

      What’s really stupid is when people commit insurance fraud by setting their cars aflame, because they frequently use accelerants to make sure that the car burns to the ground before the firemen arrive, and those accelerants can be detected.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        insurance can’t deny your claim even if you left it unlocked, windows down, keys in the ignition with engine running in a high crime area while you were at the diner having dinner.

        Theft is still a crime and you’re still victim. It’s like saying it’s not rape if she was dressed, or barely dressed, like she giving it away. But if you were totally upside down on the loan and you had gap coverage, insurance still needs to pay up. If the cops aren’t calling it a false report, insurance is on the hook. People do dumb things. That’s partly why there’s insurance.

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      I assume many cars “stolen” with the keys already in them are recovered by police with the keys still in them (and possibly with the thief still in them). I assume the police report would indicate the presence of keys.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Thieves usually don’t leave the keys behind. A friend calls me for help, said he lost his keys at the sports bar, or someone stole them. He was sitting in his Expedition when he calls (window he could force down). I get there in 10 minutes and he’s standing where his truck was. He had went back inside to look again. Oops! He remembered had put his keys on the bar and left them when he went into the bathroom. Yeah he was drunk. But still.

        It was recovered by police the next day without keys. Minor damage, plus a re-key, towing and storage. Insurance paid up. It was $2,000 blunder.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Alex Dykes is driving around in the brand new 2015 Dodge Charger R/T

    Mark Stevenson (that’s me) is cruising in the top-trim 2015 Toyota Avalon Limited

    I can think of many ways to have fun in either one of those cars.


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