By on January 20, 2015

KDM 2015 Hyundai Veloster 01

The current Hyundai Veloster will gain some new features for this year, but only in its home market for the time being.

Autoblog reports the biggest feature for the hatchback is the seven-speed dual-clutch transmission that will replace the outgoing six-speed unit in the Turbo variant. The DCT will help funnel the 1.6-liter turbo-four’s 204 horses and 195 lb-ft of torque to the front.

Other features include new wheels, Turbo upholstery graphics on the seats, an engine sound equalizer with six sounds from which drivers can choose, and a revised instrument cluster.

Price of admission for the newish Veloster ranges from ₩18.45 million ($18,550 USD) for the base Younique edition, to ₩23.7 ($22,000) for the Turbo model. No word thus far on whether any of these features will be headed to North American showrooms down the road.

Below are the spec/price sheets for those who can read Hangul:

KDM 2015 Hyundai Veloster Spec + Price Sheet 01

KDM 2015 Hyundai Veloster Spec + Price Sheet 02

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32 Comments on “Korean Market Hyundai Veloster Receives Seven-Speed DCT For 2015...”


  • avatar

    The Veloster was a very ambitious and cool car. I just feel Hyundai should have built it with the same engine from the Sonata 2.0t. The Veloster’s turbo had really bad lag.

    It probably would have done better if it was built on the Sonata platform and had 4 real doors instead of 3.

    Many people would have appreciated a manual, hatchback with that much space. Especially pet owners.

    • 0 avatar
      insalted42

      Agreed, for the most part. Except isn’t/wasn’t the lineup space for a hatchback with 4 real doors and a manual already taken up by the Elantra GT and now, also, the 5-door Accent?

      It is a shame about the Turbo laggy engine. I was really hoping they’d update the powerplant to take this cool, eccentric little car to the next level.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        What a shame too. The direct injected 2.4 is a sweet engine. Of course, they can’t game the EPA numbers as well with that engine, so this is where it leads us.

    • 0 avatar
      John R

      Can I interest you in this Kia Forte 5 in SX trim? Same motor, manual, and 5 doors.

      http://goo.gl/QZKGIE

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “The Veloster was a very ambitious and cool car. I just feel Hyundai should have built it with the same engine from the Sonata 2.0t. The Veloster’s turbo had really bad lag.”
      — I will admit I haven’t driven one myself and certainly wasn’t aware that turbo lag was as severe as you claim, but then, turbo lag has always been noticeable–even Ford’s EcoBoost has noticeable turbo lag that really distracts student drivers when they first try to drive it.

      “It probably would have done better if it was built on the Sonata platform and had 4 real doors instead of 3.”
      — Or it might not have. People who want sports cars don’t want a sedan. I would flat refuse to consider it as a sports car if it had four full doors.

      “Many people would have appreciated a manual, hatchback with that much space. Especially pet owners.”
      — Could you explain that addendum? Why would pet owners appreciate a manual? Meanwhile, I’ve found I just love the dry clutch transmission as it shifts far faster than a 3-pedal model while still giving you the gearing control for better speed and acceleration. And yes, my other vehicle is a true stick. I’m really hoping the new upgraded model is a dry-clutch instead.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      This is actually a pretty solid idea. Chop a few inches off the wheelbase and go balls deep with the whole “4 door coupe” thing. I can dig it.

  • avatar
    kovakp

    It’s fun to laugh at this kind of utter misreading of the market.
    Everybody poops.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      Have some special insight into the Korean market the rest of us don’t, do you?

      • 0 avatar
        kovakp

        Huh? Don’t care about the Korean market. Task Corey with that. They’re also trying to sell that silly thing here in the States which is all I’m referring to.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Kovakp I’m not sure why you’d try and say anything about Korea when we have Korean God here in the form of signal11.

          In fact he should be writing these articles, because there isn’t anybody who knows anything like he does about said country.

          /s

  • avatar
    wmba

    What they might want to do first is to add a bit of structural integrity, followed by a modicum of handling and steering feel, and a rewrite of the spec sheet to state the actual horsepower, because it sure isn’t 201.

    Then again, to the people this thing attracts, none of the above matters much. It’s more of a case of “Look at meeeeee! I’m cool!”

  • avatar
    319583076

    I saw one of these “in the wild” this weekend for the first time in a very long time. I like the styling and appreciate the greater practicality/utility this promises over a traditional, small coupe.

    But by all accounts, this thing is a terrible drive. Poor handling and anemic power.

    Accordingly, it’s not a car I will consider buying. I still like the unique style, though.

    • 0 avatar
      kovakp

      I haven’t seen one since the video of the park-buzzing 14 year-old feeding his grandpa’s to that Ram’s front bumper.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The Veloster is follows in the tradition of the Cavalier Coupe, Pontiac SunFire and/or Grand Am: a sportyish-looking car without any of the caveats you’d expect in a sporty car, for a decent price.

      A few decades ago, you’d have called these a “Secretary’s Car”. The Scion tC is another example of this.

      There’s nothing wrong with this, and Hyundai has the Genesis Coupe for people who would like a little more sport (and can stand the compromise). I’d personally prefer the Genesis was a hatchback, and had two more doors, but c’est la vie.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      Yeah, it seems like this car has fallen off the radar. I know they still sell these, but I rarely see them at all. It’s just an inexpensive car with a sporty appearance and no sporty bones.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Its main problem is ugly. The only reason this car stays on my radar is because its one of the few hatchback, 2 door (OK 3 door), turbos left for sale here in the US. My wife has pretty much given in to the fact that her next car will most likely be a Mini since that’s the only thing left that could replace her Volvo C30. The Golf is out due to past VeeDub experience. I actually think an Audi TT is what she really needs when the C30 is done.

  • avatar
    insalted42

    I still sort of wish they had just gone full CRX on the Veloster and torn out the rear seat and taken out the weird 2/3rd rear door. Even with the anemic 2.4, it would have made a better CRX than the CRZ ever was. Certainly has the butt for it….

  • avatar
    SC5door

    2.4L? This car comes with a 1.6L in base form.

    If it had the 2.4L GDI it wouldn’t be such a dog.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Ha, “younique.” Typical Engrish spelling on a word they don’t really know.

    Statistically speaking, the Veloster is driven by the COOLEST people, who are VERY keen on driving in a sporty fashion. This car is also very prestigious, and will make you feel wealthier than an SL500 driver – and faster as well.

    /s

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Who cares about “cool”? I just want Fun and four doors does not equate to “fun” in my book.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      Are you sure it’s not an intentional corruption of “you” + “unique” to appeal to narcissists who firmly believe their initial judgments and opinions are absolute fact?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I don’t think so, because I can read the Korean. The first character is technically “yu” (looks like a man with arms out), but it’s unnatural for a Korean to “spell” something starting with a letter U, as they don’t have a hard U sound in their language. Just soft ones, like “un” in Kim Jong Un. Words with a hard U are just spelled with a Y when translated.

        Koreans like certain English adjectives, and use them in/on marketing (written in English) even if they aren’t appropriate. Examples:

        unique (younique)
        story
        sensual
        exotic
        sensory
        fun
        style
        on style
        in style
        mode

        Best example was one night walking through a random part of the city with a couple coworkers where we normally didn’t go. At the top of a new high-rise, we saw an illuminated title (as they like to do), the name of the building.

        “WE’VE”

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          Interesting, my Lilliputian knowledge of Korean culture is almost entirely due to watching a Korean-language soap opera available on “ghetto cable” during the time I lived in NYC.

          It was subtitled, I can neither speak nor read any Korean.

        • 0 avatar
          Signal11

          Corey, you’re full of it.

          If you’d seen any of the recent advertising for the Younique package, you’d know that they’re emphasizing the uniqueness of the buyer and pushing the whole “you are unique” thing.

          There are tons of Korean words that start with the character that is pronounced “yu” and that “yu” is also very common in names. Seriously, you could not possible be more wrong about this.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ok! :) I know nothing. I bow to you and your ultimate Korean knowledge.

          • 0 avatar
            Signal11

            Well Corey, while I wouldn’t consider my knowledge “ultimate” I can speak the language fluently and teach med school and engineering classes in Korean. I’d say that gives me some insight into what is and isn’t possible with the Korean language, wouldn’t you?

            Seriously, I can hardly make heads or tails of what sounds you think are or aren’t possible, especially since pretty much all Korean base vowels (with the exception of ㅡ and l) can have a y- sound added (in writing by adding a vowel stem).

            I like you Corey, but you’re way out of your lane on this one.

  • avatar
    Occam

    I had a rental Veloster for a week-long rental. I was very impressed by it – I’d like to drive one with the higher-tier engine and a proper transmission, but even with the DCT and the base engine, it was an enjoyable little critter.

    The single driver door and two passenger doors is brilliant. I have the comfort of a coupe on my side – thanks to a full size door, there’s no giant pillar next to my face and the armrest extends all the way back – but passengers can easily enter and exit from the curb side.

    My only complaint was the the rear suspension got a touch wonky on D.C.’s sometimes tight cloverleaf ramps.

  • avatar
    Andrew T.

    I made the choice to buy a Veloster four months ago (manual, not dual clutch), and it was one of the best things I ever did. It’s peppy, fun to drive, has good traction in the snow, and gives up to 40 mpg on the highway. I love the asymmetrical door arrangement, and the interior is very well finished.

    Styling is subjective and beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but I personally think the regular Veloster is the most attractive and interesting car you can buy today (the Turbo version with its enormous Ford Louisville grille, somewhat less so.)

    Neither version is very common, though. In my day-to-day commutes, I rarely see another Veloster on the road.

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