By on October 20, 2014

2014-Jeep-Wrangler-Sport-Front-Three-Quarter2

With the possibility of an aluminum Jeep Wrangler being built elsewhere, the United Auto Workers and political leaders are coming together to convince Fiat Chrysler Automobiles to keep the icon in Toledo, Ohio.

Automotive News reports the gathering will occur Monday at the UAW Local 12, with U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown, U.S. Representative Marcy Kaptur, and Toledo mayor D. Michael Collins joining the group of workers, local leaders and members of the community to launch a campaign to keep the Wrangler at the Chrysler Assembly Plant, where 1,700 (out of a total of over 6,000) help assemble the icon with the help of 800 employed by neighborhood suppliers.

The campaign is set to begin as FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne warned that should the next-generation Wrangler be based upon an aluminum unibody, it would be built elsewhere:

If the solution is aluminum, then I think unfortunately that Toledo is the wrong place, the wrong setup to try and build a Wrangler, because it requires a complete reconfiguring of the assets that would be cost-prohibitive. It would be so outrageously expensive that it would be impossible to try and work out of that facility.

UAW Local 12 president Bruce Baumhower invited 40 elected officials and local businessmen to the gathering, with the intent of establishing a task force set to address the issues that would take the Wrangler out of Toledo.

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85 Comments on “UAW, Political Leaders Uniting To Keep Wrangler In Ohio...”


  • avatar
    jrhmobile

    Which is what Marchionne’s trial balloon was all about anyway.

    He’s based his career at Fiat on deals getting something for nothing. From telling GM to pay up $2 billion or he’d stick them with that dog of a brand to taking Chrysler off the government’s hand for corporate welfare rates, he’s proven his modus operandi is to run his company on others’ resources.

    The only reason Marchionne said he was considering moving Jeep production out of Toledo was to shake down everybody in sight to keep operations there.

  • avatar
    anti121hero

    If there’s one plant I don’t wanna see go, it’s the Toledo plant. Although I’m a jeep guy at heart

  • avatar
    Vega

    Great. Unions and politicians trying to control which car is built where did wonders to the UK auto industry in the 70s…

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You’d rather see the production go overseas? It’s not impossible.

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        Wrangler production isn’t going anywhere.

        Here are the key sentences in the story:

        “UAW Local 12 president Bruce Baumhower invited 40 elected officials and local businessmen to the gathering, with the intent of establishing a task force set to address the issues that would take the Wrangler out of Toledo.”

        Translation – key elected officials and local businessmen will lay out the local infrastructure improvements that they can sell to local taxpayers in order to ensure continued production of the Wrangler in Toledo.

  • avatar

    “the next-generation Wrangler be based upon an aluminum unibody”

    If they’re going to alienate their core buyers that much then they might as well go the whole hog and manufacture it in China.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Sergio wants out icons, not our ex-cons.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Let’s just say I would be shocked if this were to leave given recent investments to Toledo, Sergio is bluffing to possibly see if he can extort more concessions.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      It may be that the plan is to build a steel vehicle in Toledo, but not the Wrangler?

      It sounded like he was balking at the cast of recreating the plant to build aluminum vehicles, vs the cost of building new. Perhaps part of that cost involves tossing out perfectly good steel tooling that could be used for building something else?

      That’s how these guys think, but I can’t guess any better than that without knowing more about the plant and, honestly, automotive manufarturing. But he really is working straight from the MBA playbook.

      It is easy to imagine that they’ll move Wrangler production elsewhere, but also invest in the Toledo plant to build some sort of steel vehicle, since that could theoretically leverage what’s already in place there.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        @Luke42

        Something will be built there as I have some insider type info in which FCA invested a chunk of change into the plant and its employees. I’m not sure how it will turn out, but it would be a nice PR piece for the politicians and UAW if FCA decided to build is fuel-friendlier alum bodied Jeep in ‘Murica vs overseas. I suspect Sergio is simply putting feelers out to see if he can be compensated to make this happen.

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    I thought an aluminum Jeep was a Land Rover.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Making the Wrangler aluminum is a bad idea. The things are profitable enough, Jeep should just pay their CAFE violation and deal with it. Or put the 3.0 Diesel in.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      I know it’s considered sacrilegious, but some Wrangler owners think it could stand to lose a few pounds.

    • 0 avatar
      NMGOM

      Mandalorian – – –

      You’re right. As a Wrangler owner, I can tell you that there are three profoundly dumb ideas that threaten true Jeep-hood:
      1) Aluminum;
      2) Unibody;
      3) Independent Suspension. (This last one makes me roll over in my grave and I’m not even there yet.)

      Wanna save weight? Go with high-strength steels;
      Wanna get better mileage? Go with diesel engines (Jeeps like torque anyway.):
      Wanna reduce aero-drag? Buy a Honda.

      Nuff said…

      ================

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      I really like the Wrangler, but won’t buy one because I won’t take the the MPG hit.

      Judging my the way the salesman I talked to reacted when I mentioned efficiency, I’d guess that guys like me trapse through that showroom every day… People who like the Wrangler and it’s timeless simplicity, but who walk away because of the MPG.

      Yeah, they’re selling as many JKUs athey can make, but imagine how many they could sell if its basic specs looked like they were from thin decade?

      My midlife crisis convertible toy will probably be a JKU. In aluminum, with diesel and/or electric under the hood, please.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        I’m a huge Wrangler fan (already plotting to rent one to explore the island with when I’m on St. John in March) but I don’t really want to be in one long enough for mpg to matter. IOW, they’re great for around town type trips and heading to the beach or woods. Long distance, where the mileage really matters, isn’t their thing anyways.

        • 0 avatar
          AJ

          Over 15 days last month I drove my TJ about 4,200 miles pulling an expedition trailer at an average mpg of 13.

          Sure that was a lot of gas, but that’s about the most miles it gets driven a year. It’s the best, funniest vehicle I’ve owned. It’s got more modification options (which mine has had a lot of them) and top up, top down, hard top soft top. It’s a blast. Its taken me places few people go.

          I do enjoy long trips with it. It’s got a great view.

          My wife on the other hand is looking forward to selling it when I die.

      • 0 avatar
        NMGOM

        Luke42 – – –

        Somehow this “bad mileage” thing got blown way out of proportion. Maybe it came from older Jeeps like the TJ. But the new JK Wrangler with Pentastar engine is quite good (relatively).
        Even my 7-year old JK with older 3.8 liter V6 (plus Gibson Muffler and AiRaid Cold Air Intake, and with manual transmission) shows the following:
        1) Pure City: 19.5
        2) 50/50 mix, City and highway: 20.5
        3) Pure highway, 55mph: 23.5-24.5, depending on conditions.

        No, it’s not exactly the 35 mpg I get with the Z4 (see avatar), but on a 2-hour trip, the difference is only about $5.00; and I always use Shell V-Power gasoline even.

        ====================

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    It’s hard to get upset about the prospect of Jeeps not being built by a bunch of statists in the US when the company was owned by the French and Germans and is now owned by Fiat. AMC should have been the dead canary in the coal mine when they wound up in the hands of Renault.

    • 0 avatar
      MPAVictoria

      Always good to see a true patriot cheering for his fellow countrymen to lose their jobs.

      /Right wingers amaze me with their hatred of their own country.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        We all do not feel as such.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        You’re amazed because you failed to notice that the left has always hated the country and everything that made it worthwhile. Now that they’ve had some time to remake it in their image, why would anyone that cared for the principals that created self-governance want anything to do with it? We’ve had the concept of rights appropriated as a way of denying unfavored people their fundamental ones so that those whose votes need buying can feel entitled to the slavery of others.

        • 0 avatar
          MPAVictoria

          “You’re amazed because you failed to notice that the left has always hated the country”

          100% wrong and 0% right.

          And even if we agree that you are right, which you are not, how is some factory worker in Toledo to blame for any of this? He/She just wants to pay the mortgage and put food on the table. So why do you hate working men and women?

          Do you long for a world where you are viewed as some sort of aristocrat? Where lesser people must doff their hats and lower their heads when you pass them in the street?

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            It is the progressives that are working for the return of serfdom. They see the US Constitution as an assault on their place as demigods and progress is measured by its dismantling. Removal of limits on the executive? Check. Courts over-ruling elected legislatures? Check. Obviating the substance of the Bill of Rights? Check. Wait and see what you’ve sown. The last couple years should have given you a taste of what the end of the US means for the rest of the world. Considering what you’ve written here though, it seems that you are too out of touch and well beyond the reach of help.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “Courts over-ruling elected legislatures? Check.”

            I would suggest that you read Article 3 of the Constitution. (I’m sure that you never got that far.)

        • 0 avatar
          MPAVictoria

          Sorry. I also had to point out that it was left wing radicals who founded your country.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            You have to remember something, MPA – to our good friend CJ, “left winger” is shorthand for “someone I hate.”

            I bet he’s a real blast at parties though…

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            It is the progressives that are working for the return of serfdom. They see the Constitution as an assault on their place as demigods and progress is measured by its dismantling. Removal of limits on the executive? Check. Courts over-ruling elected legislatures? Check. Obviating the substance of the Bill of Rights? Check. Wait and see what you’ve sown. The last couple years should have given you a taste of what the end of the US means for the rest of the world. Considering what you’ve written here though, it seems that you are too out of touch and well beyond the reach of help.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Yup – there were all a bunch of radical leftists.

            Jefferson makes Clinton bedroom exploits look positively G rated and Adams was a Massachusetts liberal.

            Thomas Paine, the writer of Common Sense, died penniless and was even by his peers considered a liberal leftist loon with very dangerous ideas as he moved on in years.

            Those bastards in Massachusetts are why we have public schools today, something about all towns requiring them and the people paying for them through taxes.

            I learned just last week on a plantation tour that all land owners in Louisiana were required to build levees, roads, fences, and infrastructure for the common good along their property lines. Could you image that same requirement today?

            Could you imagine if the property owner was required to pay for the road in front of their property line, and sidewalk, and storm sewer, and lighting, and if needed walls, levees, or other infrastructure? Holy crap, those – those – socialists!

            But never mind all of that – I agree with our poster that we need a return to the good old days. Going back to 1955 gosh darn it, when the world feared our military, we dominated GDP, and we had the highest standard of living in the world.

            Ahhh yes, the good old days of 1955.

            When 34% of people worked for unions.

            When college at state institutions were largely free. And those institutions were well funded with the best teachers and equipment in the world.

            When kids got healthy school lunches paid by the federal government mostly because the idea that having healthy kids was good for the country and would create better students.

            When the government invested in the largest public works projects in world history. Socialistic evil projects like the Eisenhower Highway System, and the completion of the TVA, never mind the space program, GPS satellite infrastructure or yes by golly, even the Internet. Never mind the billions poured into private industry to support R&D projects.

            Back in those good old days there was government housing programs and cheap mortgages for the millions of veterans, and the GI bill for small business loans and education at private college, which the average slob could afford.

            Oh – and employers generally provided fully paid health insurance, you could see the doctor of your choice, and the doctors decided on your health care, not a corporation.

            I for one am so glad that I have the Tea Party and Republicans to save me from the tyranny of 1955 living.

            Our lives with free lunch for kids, free college education (or ridiculous low costs) at the best schools, massive public works projects for the common good, employer provided health care, and lets not forget, a doubling of the minimum wage in 1949 which lead to over 20 years of prosperity.

            Now – if you’re planning to type, “well of course things were so good, we bombed the rest of the world flat and had no competition,” I suggest you do some more research.

            European GDP surpassed the United States in 1947, just two years after World War II and continued to grow. Japan GDP wasn’t exactly tearing up the global markets prior to World War II, and exploded in less than a decade after. Never mind that we altruistically bank rolled the rebuilding of our enemies on a grand scale – and it reaped huge dividends in creating allies and building lasting peace in those nations.

            Yup – it sure was awful in those good old days.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            What happened to all those wonderful union jobs? Surely, all those comrades didn’t agree to disband their collectives? Did capital trick them into rescinding their organized bargaining rights? Or was it that effected industries couldn’t modernize because of higher costs, work rules and featherbedding? The UAW hate strikes of the ’40s and ’50s must make you very proud.

            http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/The-312/October-2012/Rahm-Emanuel-Trade-Union-Racism-and-the-Burden-of-History/

          • 0 avatar
            malikknows

            A sweet bit of revisionism, that. Nonsense on stilts. Stick to Canadian history or do the work.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Feeling lonely today, CJ? Need some attention?

      I’ll tell ya what…you don’t like it here, we’ll all take up a collection and buy you a one way ticket to your own private island, where you can lord it over the natives.

      Count me in for $10.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      CJ is right. Over the years, Jeep has been passed around like a cheap date. The UAW likely has little say in where Jeep’s owners decide the Wrangler will be built.

      But as highdesertcat says below, it will probably stay put after heavy tax breaks and employment attrition. Then the UAW can declare victory even though they’ll sacrifice a portion of the workforce in order to retain the rest.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    So Romney was right (again) when he said they were going to move Jeep production out of Ohio?

    Remember how he was vilified in the press for saying this? I’m sure all sorts of apologies will be forthcoming.

  • avatar
    Onus

    Okay to enlighten the people here.

    The plant that produces the wrangler is run by suppliers. Chrysler does nothing but do the final trim line for the wrangler.

    The suppliers also own the plants. Now this is where cost is an issue. Diamler reduced costs by having the suppliers build the plant which they would own. This allowed them to demolish the old Toledo Plant that was located down the street, and save money from having to build a new plant. This is also what is limiting wrangler production at the time. They sell all the wranglers that they can build.

    The point being FCA has plants that it already owns, that can fit the capacity needed for the wrangler. They don’t have to build a whole new plant, or buy out the suppliers. If your a person running a company in the same situation you’re reasoning would be much the same.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Losing ANY jobs regardless of reason is of great concern to the UAW and the locale. Regardless, Sergio is going to do what he decides to do. Sergio is the Lee Iacocca of the here and now.

      No doubt Sergio will have provided avenues that the UAW and the local government can choose to travel if they want Sergio to keep the plant there. My guess those avenues would be massive tax breaks and a reduction in the UAW workforce through attrition.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      Thanks for posting this info.

  • avatar
    ArBee

    Sign me up for an island, too. However, I intend to be a benevolent philosopher-king, painting and frolicking with the island girls a la Gauguin.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    I had a similar idea, until I read that he had died of syphilis complications.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It appears the UAW is worried about losing more rank and file if the Wrangler manufacturing is moved.

    All, the UAW have to do is create a competitive workforce. This is the biggest downfall of any union. They are anti competitive.

    I do think Sergio will assess the situation with FCA and the consumer in mind first and second.

    The UAW will be down at the bottom of FCA’s priorities and so it should. I would place the workers at FCA above the UAW.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      It’s the local that is meeting with politicians. The UAW isn’t going to lose jobs if FCA moves Wrangler production. Jobs will just shift to a different plant. Leading candidates would be Sterling Heights, MI and Belvidere, IL. It is possible Toledo could get additional product to offset the loss of the Wrangler. Don’t make this a union problem when it isn’t.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        The why is the UAW involved in discussions?

        Not union problem?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          If Wrangler production is moved to another plant, it won’t be because of the UAW. The issues with Toledo have nothing to do with the UAW.

          Of course the local wants to keep a profitable product that has been selling well for decades. Even if it is moved, it will be to another UAW plant and FCA will backfill with other production.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I see – a competitive work force.

      So lets recap.

      Unions up north evil so we’ll move to “right to work” states and instead of paying say $30 an hour we’ll pay $24ish an hour – as low as $17 an hour to start. They’ll be jobs people are grateful to have and it’s all the unions fault.

      Now the chorus is if we just get rid of this pesky minimum wage, gut the healthcare requirements, and scale back on ideas like a 40 hour work week, we can compete with Mexico…

      …where the average auto worker makes $3.65 an hour.

      Sorry, but if that’s what we want for America, count me out.

      Anyway, any truly red blooded patriotic DEY TERK ERR JOB American should be thrilled when a manufacturing job goes overseas. That is one less illegal alien here taking our jobs.

      Ha, in another 20 years maybe we’ll be climbing over the fence into Mexico to build Buicks for China.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @APaGttH,
        I don’t see it your way. Your view would of been correct decades ago when manufacturing as you see it was a positive. To keep manufacturing or production many jobs must go, there is no way around this.

        Subsidising production and “Buying American” will only reduce your standard of living. So, great everyone has a job, but what will they pay to survive.

        You guys have to stop trying to compete with developing and intermediate nations and compete with modern countries.

        If someone can make a candle cheaper why waste your time subsidising. Build a better candle stick machine to reduce manpower, like what’s occurred in agriculture.

        I don’t see to many people crying over the automation of agriculture. And who does most of the menial farm work in the US?

        The US should find out what it’s good at and exploit it. Any country can make anything viable if it is protected and subsidised.

        But is that good for a country? Why not invest the money into more profitable ventures?

        I do find industry in the “West” and even Australia holding onto the past. Do you still think we should harvest by hand?

      • 0 avatar
        MPAVictoria

        Bravo. Great to see other commenters replying to these right wing nut jobs.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @MPAVictoria,
          It’s neither left or right. Both side are wrong. Whomever doesn’t embrace the changing future will become less.

          When the Luddites that spun fabric complained that looms will kill of their jobs,did this matter to the US? No.

          When the electric motor killed of the artisans, cottage industries, did this matter to the US? No.

          Even with the advent of consumer mass production the US lead and gave the US a very good lifestyle. The US adapted this very well.

          Will you the newest generation of Luddite matter? No.

          Because whatever countries embrace the next phase of industrialisation will be the winner.

          The ones trying to protect future worthless jobs will pay the price. This is sad but true.

          Look at the agri industry. Do we still harvest by hand? No. I don’t hear many people complaining. But they did eons ago.

          Do I hear the candlestick makers union up in arms? No. They don’t matter, they don’t exist.

          What about the blacksmiths/farriers?

          Yup, sit back and whine and cry about the immediate future. You sound like the people who spent their lives pi$$ing away their income, then complain because they are broke. Do they matter? No.

          I’m neither left or right. I believe in a minimum wage, public health and good education and the military. Everything else isn’t the governments business.

          As I started with, the future of white and blue collar jobs will become like agriculture. Why use people if they aren’t necessary? That’s make it expensive.

          The industrial revolution created the middle class and kills off the middle class. But the middle class will start afresh, but with different jobs.

          New and better jobs will be generated, like it always has throughout the industrial revolution. But people like you and the unions just make it harder than it has to be.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        APaGttH and MPAVictoria,
        I’m not really a right winger or whatever you guys in the States call it. I even loathe the Tea Party as much as I loathe the socialist unionists.

        The future is changing maybe the Luddites will see this. Current middle class jobs are going to AI and robotics. Look at agriculture, I don’t hear many complaining that billions of farm jobs are gone.

        But you are not farmers, so what do you care. What about the cottage industries, they were middle class jobs of their time?

        Blue and white collar jobs will go, like agriculture and our great, great gran kids will they care? Nope, they will live in a new world. Protecting current jobs and not being progressive will only hurt society and reduce living standards.

        It makes us feel warm and fuzzy to think we are saving ourselves, but your solutions and union solutions are short term.

        That is selfish. But you are talking left and right wing.

        Jobs will go, and lots of them. This must occur to progress. Or you can be a Luddite.

      • 0 avatar
        mr.cranky

        @APaGttH- Nice to see other sane, pro-labor folks on here.

        I see people who blame unions for everything as people who would most certainly benefit from being part of an union.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Try again!

    @APaGttH,
    I don’t see it your way. Your view would of been correct decades ago when manufacturing as you see it was a positive. To keep manufacturing or production many jobs must go, there is no way around this.

    Subsidising production and “Buying American” will only reduce your standard of living. So, great everyone has a job, but what will they pay to survive. You guys have to stop trying to compete with developing and intermediate nations and compete with modern countries.

    If someone can make a candle cheaper why waste your time subsidising. Build a better candle stick machine to reduce manpower, like what’s occurred in agriculture.

    I don’t see to many people crying over the automation of agriculture. And who does most of the menial farm work in the US?

    The US should find out what it’s good at and exploit it. Any country can make anything viable if it is protected and subsidised.

    But is that good for a country? Why not invest the money into more profitable ventures? I do find industry in the “West” and even Australia holding onto the past.

    Do you still think we should harvest by hand? The world is changing and we will not stop it. People who refuse to be flexible and change with the new technology.

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    Let’s see
    iPad-assembled in China
    iPhone-assembled in China
    Eco-Drive watch-Japanese movement
    Pendleton Shirt-made in China
    Costco jeans-made in Mexico
    Reebok Zags-made in China

    Yep u betcha, I’m ‘Merican.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @MPAVictoria,
    It’s neither left or right. Both side are wrong.

    Whomever doesn’t embrace the changing future will become less.

    When the Luddites that spun fabric complained that looms will kill of their jobs,did this matter to the US? No.

    When the electric motor killed of the artisans, cottage industries, did this matter to the US? No.

    Even with the advent of consumer mass production the US lead and gave the US a very good lifestyle. The US adapted this very well.

    Will you the newest generation of Luddite matter? No.

    Because whatever countries embrace the next phase of industrialisation will be the winner.

    The ones trying to protect future worthless jobs will pay the price. This is sad but true.

    Look at the agri industry. Do we still harvest by hand? No. I don’t here many people complaining. But they did eons ago.

    Do I hear the candlestick makers union up in arms? No. They don’t matter, they don’t exist.

    What about the blacksmiths/farriers?

    Yup, sit back and whine and cry about the immediate future. You sound like the people who spent their lives pi$$ing away their income, then complain because they are broke. Do they matter? No.

    I’m neither left or right. I believe in a minimum wage, public health and good education and the military. Everything else isn’t the governments business.

    As I started with, the future of white and blue collar jobs will become like agriculture. Why use people if they aren’t necessary? That’s make it expensive.

    New and better jobs will be generated, like it always has throughout the industrial revolution. But people like you and the unions just make it harder than it has to be.

    Selfish comes to mind. We ain’t entitled to anything in the world, earn it. If you think that’s right wing then I feel sorry for you.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Derek,
    I’ve posted a number of comments and they aren’t posting. Also I’ve waited for them to be retrieved from your spam bin.

    ?????????????????????????????????

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’m still sad that the brick smoke stacks that said “Willys” and “Overland” that defined the old Jeep plant are gone. Should have been kept as historical markers. :(

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