By on September 4, 2012

Volkswagen and Toyota join Chrysler in delivering better than expected numbers for August as our table starts to populate.Volkswagen reports a jaw-dropping 63 percent gain for the Volkswagen brand, 48 percent for the group. Says Michelle Krebs of Edmunds;

“If the brand continues at this pace – which, of course,  is never guaranteed – VW’s goal for 800,000 sales per year by 2018 may not be as lofty as once thought.”

Toyota reports group sales of 188,520 units in August 2012, up 40.2 percent on a daily selling rate (DSR) basis and 45.6 percent on an unadjusted raw volume basis. Data not in table pending full press release at 10:30am Pacific.

Ford and GM report more subdued numbers, but at  13 percent for Ford and 10 percent for GM much better than predicted by the analysts. GM says that sales to retail customers were up 11 percent. Sales to fleet customers were up 6 percent compared with a year ago. GM expects a SAAR of 14.6 million for August. GM sales chart here.

When everything was tabulated, August sales had jumped 20 percent, which was the high end of expectations. The seasonally adjusted sales rate  (SAAR) for August came in at 14.53 million, the highest SAAR cash-for-clunkers in August 2009.

August Light Vehicle Sales

Final table

Automaker Aug. 2012 Aug. 2011 Pct. chng. 8 month
2012
8 month
2011
Pct. chng.
BMW Group 22,585 23,954 –6% 208,524 193,805 8%
    BMW division 16,835 20,815 –19% 164,636 155,929 6%
    Mini 5,718 3,109 84% 43,632 37,636 16%
    Rolls-Royce 32 30 7% 256 240 7%
BMW Group 22,585 23,954 –6% 208,524 193,805 8%
Chrysler Group 148,472 130,120 14% 1,108,629 882,078 26%
    Chrysler Division 28,070 22,497 25% 216,616 133,992 62%
    Dodge 47,348 41,818 13% 344,556 305,369 13%
    Dodge/Ram 73,413 63,904 15% 537,502 468,770 15%
    Fiat 4,150 3,106 34% 28,566 11,088 158%
    Jeep 42,839 40,613 6% 325,945 268,228 22%
    Ram 26,065 22,086 18% 192,946 163,401 18%
Chrysler Group 148,472 130,120 14% 1,108,629 882,078 26%
Daimler AG 23,443 20,731 13% 188,390 162,399 16%
    Maybach 4 3 33% 32 24 33%
    Mercedes-Benz 22,686 20,323 12% 182,077 159,087 15%
    Smart USA 753 405 86% 6,281 3,288 91%
Daimler AG 23,443 20,731 13% 188,390 162,399 16%
Ford Motor Co. 196,749 174,800 13% 1,510,614 1,424,851 6%
    Ford division 188,608 166,794 13% 1,453,536 1,366,780 6%
    Lincoln 8,141 8,006 2% 57,078 57,823 –1%
    Mercury –% 248 –100%
Ford Motor Co. 196,749 174,800 13% 1,510,614 1,424,851 6%
General Motors 240,520 218,479 10% 1,757,470 1,695,004 4%
    Buick 18,000 16,021 12% 122,589 126,493 –3%
    Cadillac 14,704 13,208 11% 90,933 100,449 –10%
    Chevrolet 169,978 152,779 11% 1,270,582 1,206,322 5%
    GMC 37,838 36,471 4% 273,366 261,740 4%
General Motors 240,520 218,479 10% 1,757,470 1,695,004 4%
Honda (American) 131,321 82,321 60% 949,247 770,265 23%
    Acura 15,646 9,054 73% 101,407 79,136 28%
    Honda Division 115,675 73,267 58% 847,840 691,129 23%
Honda (American) 131,321 82,321 60% 949,247 770,265 23%
Hyundai Group 111,127 99,693 12% 866,598 772,658 12%
    Hyundai division 61,099 58,505 4% 479,789 440,863 9%
    Kia 50,028 41,188 22% 386,809 331,795 17%
Hyundai Group 111,127 99,693 12% 866,598 772,658 12%
Jaguar Land Rover 4,756 3,617 32% 36,584 31,114 18%
    Jaguar 1,029 810 27% 8,546 8,204 4%
    Land Rover 3,727 2,807 33% 28,038 22,910 22%
Jaguar Land Rover 4,756 3,617 32% 36,584 31,114 18%
Maserati 219 211 4% 1,715 1,507 14%
Maserati 219 211 4% 1,715 1,507 14%
Mazda 22,234 22,632 –2% 185,349 165,794 12%
Mazda 22,234 22,632 –2% 185,349 165,794 12%
Mitsubishi 4,249 7,985 –47% 41,316 60,072 –31%
Mitsubishi 4,249 7,985 –47% 41,316 60,072 –31%
Nissan 98,515 91,541 8% 774,577 681,115 14%
    Infiniti 11,155 9,024 24% 77,151 63,702 21%
    Nissan Division 87,360 82,517 6% 697,426 617,413 13%
Nissan 98,515 91,541 8% 774,577 681,115 14%
Saab Cars North America 363 –100% 4,218 –100%
Saab Cars North America 363 –100% 4,218 –100%
Subaru 28,293 20,837 36% 217,780 174,616 25%
Subaru 28,293 20,837 36% 217,780 174,616 25%
Suzuki 1,968 2,409 –18% 17,228 18,258 –6%
Suzuki 1,968 2,409 –18% 17,228 18,258 –6%
Toyota 188,520 129,482 46% 1,399,514 1,073,072 30%
    Lexus 24,237 18,103 34% 150,604 120,652 25%
    Scion 7,722 3,649 112% 49,747 33,769 47%
    Toyota division 156,561 107,730 45% 1,199,163 918,651 31%
    Toyota/Scion 164,283 111,379 48% 1,248,910 952,420 31%
Toyota 188,520 129,482 46% 1,399,514 1,073,072 30%
Volkswagen 55,760 37,769 48% 399,146 305,506 31%
    Audi 11,527 10,201 13% 88,392 75,256 18%
    Bentley 156 124 26% 1,405 1,109 27%
    Lamborghini 40 28 43% 320 224 43%
    Porsche 3,026 2,184 39% 22,279 20,494 9%
    VW division 41,011 25,232 63% 286,750 208,423 38%
Volkswagen 55,760 37,769 48% 399,146 305,506 31%
Volvo Cars NA –% –%
Volvo Cars NA –% –%
    Other (estimate)** 238 228 4% 1,904 1,821 5%
TOTAL 1,261,849 1,051,656 20% 9,522,848 8,302,867 15%

Data courtesy Automotive News [sub]

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60 Comments on “August Sales: Up 20 Percent. Detroit Better Than Expected. Toyota-Shi And Wolfsburg MUCH Better...”


  • avatar
    mike978

    VW’s sales are impressive for now. Toyota was expected to have a large increase due to a weak August 2011, so nowhere near as impressive as VW. Although VW is starting from a lower volume base so percentages can overstate things.
    VW needs to get a competitive CRV vehicle as the Tiguan doesn`t cut it, that could add 100-150K a year in volume.

  • avatar
    Sundowner

    I realize this is completely anecdotal, but I have been suprised at how many new cars with temp tags I’ve seen running around the past two months. Of course, considering how many cars I saw on the side of the road during the really hot months of the summer, I guess its not that surising after all…

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Do you think VW’s numbers have anything to do as a result of that cute-kid-dressed-as-Darth-Vader commercial?

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Pretty funny. Of course, those strong numbers are coming because of aggressive lease deals and much lower MSRPs as VW pulled all the desirability – and cost – out of several models’ interiors and elsewhere. Will this hold or will the reliability hurt them? If VW is getting trades on older cars that had middling reliability to begin with, the lower than average reliability may not hurt that much, at least initially.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Probably more to do with the new Passat winning all the car comparos. By all accounts it’s the car Americans want, low cost, and roomy.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      VW has not been shy about incentive spending and is one of the automakers which is reported to have been using its dealer network to sell to fleet.

      Nonetheless, still impressive gains for VW.

    • 0 avatar
      Type57SC

      Jaguar sold a crapload of X-Types when they ventured down market. Selling off a past reputation and selling down will always give you a pop. Usually ends badly once reputation adjusts after people experience the reality and then the reality gets known by others (once the panache is gone).

      If VW can actually build a better car for the money than Hyundai, Toyota and others, then this is sustainable, but if people are buying it because they remember VW as kinda premium and VW is not advantaged in the volume game, then they’re in for some hurt.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      I bought a VW in August. For me it was nothing to do with their ads. I’ve been a VW diesel lover for many years and it was time for something newer. I think I surprised the sales guy because I found a car on the lot that met my criteria before going there. I test drove it, and told the guy that if they could sell it to me for the right number, I’d buy it. The 2012 TDIs qualified for 1.9% and since the 2013s are coming in, the dealer I dealt with was willing to sell a 2012 Sportwagen to me for the out the door number I told them I would pay. The 2012 TDI Sportwagen is a very nice car. So while I don’t like car payments, it was worth it to have a brand new car with more space. And the awesome 2.0 litre TDI engine doesn’t hurt either.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Top 10 GM sellers:

    Chevy Silverado – 38,295
    Chevy Cruze – 25,975
    Chevy Equinox – 20,231
    Chevy Impala – 17,066
    Chevy Malibu 14,495
    GMC Sierra 14,495
    GMC Terrain 9,143
    Chevy Sonic 8,703
    GMC Acaida 8,148
    Chevy Express 6,861

    Breakdown:

    Cars: 66,239
    Trucks & Vans: 59,651
    CUVs: 37,522

    • 0 avatar
      -Cole-

      Really missing the EdNed analysis…

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      I’m surprised at the Impala over the Malibu numbers. While our Impala was heavily discounted, I’m sure the leftover 2012 Malibus were as well.

      The Malibu lately has been outselling the Impala.

      I find it remarkable that the Impala still sells as well as it has, considering how “outdated” it is. I suppose “tried-and-true” has value for some.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        @Zackman…”tried-and-true” says it all.

      • 0 avatar
        ranwhenparked

        The Impala has pretty much always outsold the Malibu. They’re not that far apart in price, and the Impala offers a lot more space and power, plus a smoother ride – for buyers of beige family sedans, that makes an attractive package.

        Also, the Impala is something of a fleet queen, huge batches go straight to the rental car lots or government motor pools. Fleet sales account for a lower percentage of the Malibu’s numbers.

      • 0 avatar
        D in the D

        I think Impala beat Malibu because of availability, too. We bought a new Traverse last month, and visited 5 different Chevy dealers in the process. All of them had roughly double the Impalas on hand that they had in Malibus. It’s hard to sell what you don’t have.

      • 0 avatar
        Type57SC

        I’m pretty sure Impala is 80%+ fleet

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Breakdown:

      Cars: 66,239
      Trucks & Vans: 59,651
      CUVs: 37,522

      That breakdown must just be for the Chevrolet division, as it seems to be about 70,000 vehicles light.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    As expected, new product (Verano, XTS) is leading to decent gains for Buick and Cadillac. They could also get bumps from the Encore and ATS, when we’ll see just how small a Buick or Cadillac people are willing to buy.

  • avatar
    mike978

    One question related to the sales figures, why has there been an explosion (judging by the ads I see) of 24 month leases? Wasn’t 36 months a more typical term? Now I see Camry, Malibu and others offering these shorter leases, just curious.

    • 0 avatar
      D in the D

      I’m not a finance guy, but here’s my guess. A shorter term NORMALLY means higher lease payments. Customers would prefer the shorter term to stay in newer vehicles, so there’s a natural sort of trade-off there. People might pay more to have a shorter term or settle for the longer one and the lower price.

      If a manufacturer has ultra-cheap financing, or some other reason to incentivize leasing, something like you describe can happen. Instead of offering a rebate as an incentive, they are subsidizing the lease behind-the-scenes. That’s a good possibility in this current climate…

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        An incentive to move the car out of the showroom should make a bigger difference in a shorter lease.

        Higher residual projections might also make a shorter lease more attractive than previously. Since the used market got hot some time ago and has remained so, I would think this is a significant influence.

        A shorter lease term also leave the lessee more flexibility. We don’t know what life will be like tomorrow, let alone 36 months from now, so a shorter term lease keeps the lessee from getting locked into an inconvenient situation for an extra 12 months.

        Of course, owning the car outright and debt-free gives one the most flexibility.

        Of course, an increase in shorter-term leases will also increase the number of cars hitting the used markets, which will be downward pressure on resale and residual values.

        I’m not a finance guy, either, but I took a couple courses in college and dealt with it some on the job in a previous life.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Thanks D in the D and KixStart – that makes sense, the leases are quite cheap (but with a large down payment that I have seen). Will put pressure on the used market sooner.

  • avatar
    jaje

    Will Honda give up the hybrids? They don’t sell – never really did anyway. Why not focus on its volume selling cars and spend all the R&D there instead of hoping for 1k a month of hybrid sales across 3 platforms (579 for HCH, 341 Insight, 392 CRZs for 8/12). At least dump the Civic Hybrid and put a real engine the CRZ as that will reinvigorate its sales. If they want a hybrid keep the Insight only (as it is solely a hybrid). They’ve failed in every other way in this area so at least one abject failure to sell is better than 3.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      Perhaps they’re just staying in the hybrid game on account of upcoming CAFE requirements. If you have a robust hybrid system that’s cost-effective to manufacture, it’s going to be much easier to hit a CAFE target without losing your shirt.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Read my mind. The CAFE creature strikes again, sucking as much profit as it can from an automaker near you.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        28,

        True enough. Write your Congresscritter, today, and demand a serious tax on oil, which will unleash a lot of creative forces to find ways to reduce oil use and make CAFE unecessary.

      • 0 avatar
        jaje

        I’m all for using demand side economics to push fuel efficient cars (i.e. using a gas tax). This discourages gas guzzlers as it hits their wallet even harder and money out of your pocket really makes you adjust what you drive.

        Supply side economics such as CAFE are terrible as they are poorly drafted by our paid by the highest bidders congress and customers demand gas guzzlers not fuel efficient cars when gas is cheap. As for evidence of loopholes – remember the E85 capable 14 mpg SUVs get ratings of up to 20 mpg under the rules when in reality they get 9 mpg as ethanol has significantly less energy density and uses more fuel to go the same distance. A useful supply side can be requiring automakers to make a certain % using diesel fuel (much more readily available). There’s a reason why the trucking, railroad and shipping industries use diesel (and not gasoline hybrids) engines to haul billions of tons of goods every year.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        jaje, I agree with the gas tax idea in general, but I can also see why it’s so hard to implement.

        For instance, a gas tax would magnify the gap between the rich and the poor. What if rich people don’t give a f*ck about saving fuel, and as a result, the net overall fuel efficiency decreases because car makers can sell less efficient cars?

        OK, you may say, increase the gas tax until the net overall is better. At that point, the poorest 10% may not be able to afford food because food need transportation (not to mention they can’t afford to drive).

        If you make a distinction between private transportation and cargo and apply different gas prices, that will first defeat the free market notion and then create an incentive for unsafe “smuggling”.

        The only possible solution to adjust the impact of a gas tax is through income tax reform, giving the poor more tax break and more social benefit just to survive. That will need a lot of skills and cooperation at all departments of the government to make it happen. So, it won’t happen.

        The CAFE approach can be implemented “in house” and doesn’t require the cooperation of different government agencies or different political parties to happen.

      • 0 avatar
        jaje

        wsn – no matter the policy there is difficulty in implementing it. However, that said the gas tax will be simpler to calculate and much easier to implement than CAFE forcing OEMs to make cars the buying public didn’t want (loopholes galore). It also will help provide more stable prices and greater competition for higher fuel economy cars.

        Ways this will help in short and long term:

        1st – It can be used to help keep the cost of fuel more stable. Reduction in high / low gas prices throughout the year and after natural disasters (some of the taxed fuel can be put aside in an account to be applied when gas gets high from a natural disaster and it takes a while for production to catch up). The last 8 years we saw SUVs and Pickups – once have high resale value fall so badly a lot of people were underwater in their loans and the big 3 got killed on lease return residuals.

        2nd – The rich we can’t be so concerned about as they can buy almost anything they want and afford to pay for its gas guzzling. However the great majority of the buyers in the market are not rich and will now more than ever demand more fuel efficient small cars but most importantly greater fuel efficiency in larger vehicles (SUVs / Pickups). The poor will have trouble in the short term as the used prices of small cars will be higher resale due to smaller supply and less demand, however in the long run higher production of small cars will lead to greater supply of used small cars which they can buy (the poor don’t buy new cars).

        3rd – Gas guzzlers use more gas b/c the vehicle is heavier and causes more wear / tear on the road so they pay more in fuel which helps pay more to maintain roads / infrastructure.

        4th – this will help foster the US to move to fuel that has greater efficiency – case in point diesel and it will end the reign of ethanol that was forced on us by special interests. Diesel has 33% greater energy per unit than gasoline which has 33% greater energy than ethanol. Diesel cars often have large artificial premiums on them so that they cost as much as hybrids. The diesel premium over a gas engine is around $1k per car where hybrids is still around $3k. So with fuel prices now steadily higher people will demand more diesel vehicles and hybrids. Many OEMs will switch over to diesels and competition will lower their prices so that they now are cheaper than hybrid counterparts and to compete for sales with other diesel competitors for that class.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Keep pushing that diesel it will save me money on my gassers in the long run. The fact is that from a given barrel of oil there is a most cost efficient mix of product that can be obtained. There was a time when diesel was regularly cheaper than gasoline due to the low demand. With the consumer vehicles using more and more diesel thanks in large part to the diesel pickups in most areas of the US diesel in normally more expensive.

        A friend of mine that has a Jetta TDI did a year long price analysis vs what he paid for gas for his wife’s vehicle. His results showed that on average the diesel cost ~13% more than regular unleaded.

        The BTU based comparisons of different fuels does not translate to the real world MPG differences. This is especially true with diesels meeting 2010 emissions vs gasoline. The modern diesel’s advantage has been knocked down to where they are similar to difference in the cost of fuel based on the average price spread in my area. Of course that price spread varies depending on both location and season. Which brings up another point to push diesel so people will freeze, since fuel oil is diesel and that is one reason that there is a larger price spread in the winter in a number of areas.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Why isn’t Maserati included in the Chrysler Group’s sales figures? I was under the impression that it was a division of Fiat. I see that Porsche has now been folded into Volkswagen sales numbers even though all the loose ends to the of the acquisition haven’t been finished.

    • 0 avatar
      ranwhenparked

      Thought that was strange too, I know Chrysler Group is responsible for the Fiat brand in North America, but I had thought Fiat SpA was still handling Maserati themselves?

    • 0 avatar
      cmoibenlepro

      Maserati is owned by Ferrari, isn’t it?

      • 0 avatar
        KalapanaBlack

        Fiat owns Ferrari and Maserati. Maserati used to be part of the Ferrari grouping within Fiat, but now is aligned more closely with Alfa Romeo and Lancia, at least structurally.

        They will be using the Grand Cherokee chassis soon.

        They still use Ferrari-developed engine and other tech.

  • avatar
    mike978

    I saw that Lincoln MKZ sales rose >40% (2337 to 3327) even though what is likely to be a much better model is due out shortly. I assume this is heavily incentive driven.

    Also, what happened to BMW sales, down by 19%. Partly offset by a surging Mini (again how, since there was no natural disaster in Oxford last year).

    Final question, does anyone know when the new Fusion is actually due to be released and the embargo on first reviews is lifted? If you go to the Ford site the 2012 Fusion (i.e the old model) is no longer there and only the 2013 – but no cars to buy,seems kind of backwards.

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack

      Seems from my viewpoint that the outgoing CD3 cars have been dumped heavily into fleets for 3-4 months, and dealers have been advertising good deals on them. I’d say this is the bump at the end of production and nothing else.

      Also keep in mind that the tsunami last year affected all carmakers somewhat. Even Ford, GM and Chrysler weren’t able to get certain electronic parts, paint colors, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yes the tsunami did affect Ford too, but in the case of the MKZ Ford used on the limited parts for the Hybrid CD3 for the MKZ stopping production of the Fusion version.

        Ford certainly did increase the incentives on the outgoing models to make sure there wasn’t a big supply of them when the new model hit.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      The 2013 Fusions should be on lots in the October/November timeframe. Ford has been doing extremely staggered model rollouts the last few years. Some new model year vehicles land in March, others push close to December.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        Nullo, thanks for the information. It does seem odd that they roll out the configurator (not the market research effort, but the official configurator) months in advance of first drives let alone availability of the actual car.
        GM did it better with the ATS with the configurator going live on the day the embargo was lifted, but the cars were still 1-2 months away. Honda seems to have it down better still with the 2013 Accord, minimal information on the car until it is ready for the dealership – that at least minimizes the delay between reading about the car and being able to buy it.
        Do you know when the press event is for the Fusion? As I am interested to know what it is like with some actual reviews.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        I think Ford switches the configurator on the website when production officially stops on a particular model and orders start scheduling for the new one.

        Ford does have a bit of a timing problem – the launch of the Fiesta, ’12 Focus, C-Max, ’13 Escape and ’13 Fusion have all had a big marketing push before the cars are actually available. It’s frustrating at the dealer level because we have a lot of people wanting the new car they’ve seen on TV, and who don’t believe us or become upset when they hear it’s still months away. I can understand wanting to build up some buzz and a head of steam before the launch, but it does feel like it could be timed better.

        I don’t know anything about the timing for press embargoes, but training models are making their rounds around dealers this month, so it shouldn’t be long.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Both domestics, Fiat, Nissan, and Hyundai lost market share this month.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      As well as BMW and Mazda. Didn`t Mazda have natural disaster related issues last year, if so then -2% is a poor result. Lets hope the new 6 helps them.

      • 0 avatar
        jaje

        Honda was hit the worse from the tsunami and Toyota was about as badly hit as well. Honda was then hit by the flooding in Thailand as well later that year. Nissan and Mazda were not as badly affected with Nissan advertising that they had inventory last year.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Those are relatively small players though. Mitsubishi and Suzuki coughed up chunks of market share too, but whoever gobbled them up didn’t even notice.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        CJ – fair point that they are small players and Suzuki and Mitsu are even smaller and their losses wouldn`t be noticed.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        It bad enough to see the lingering SAAB funeral, but now even my poor little Suzuki is outsold by Land Rover of all things. At least Mazda is up overall.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Market share is the bread and butter.

      BMW’s numbers are super fishy. If I cared or had enough time, I’d look into their monthly breakdown / new product launches. Maybe it has something to do with the new 3 series.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Automakers can increase sales and still lose marketshare as August 2011 nos. for the Japanese makes were impacted by the effects of the tsunami – so really means little unless you go back several years.

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    Is there a place where we could look up fleet sales? The month of August is traditionally the month when dealers clear out the old model year to make room for the new model year. So we could be seeing fleet buyers swooping up the leftovers.

    If the August bonanza was indeed the work of private car buyers, then we could expect a pretty good Q4. Car sales and home sales going up is usualy a sign of consumer confidence.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      Not an easy place that I know of…some companies (Chrysler) guard this like the Colonel’s secret recipe. Not sure why they don’t release it but I can imagine why.

      GM puts their #’s on their monthly report but doesn’t break it down by rental/commercial/government etc. GM was 25% fleet in August. and is 27% fleet YTD thru August.

      Ford was 26% fleet in August.
      7% daily rental
      14% commercial
      5% government

      YTD thru August Ford is 32% fleet.
      13% daily rental
      14% commercial
      5% government

      http://seekingalpha.com/article/845421-ford-s-management-hosts-august-2012-u-s-sales-conference-transcript?page=3

      As far as I know, you have to dig it out of the monthly conference call transcripts if you really want it…and not all companies give the same info (if any at all)

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        Sunridge Nice research and interesting stats. Does anyone know if the rental car companies have trade in/buy deals with the manufacturer? I don’t know diddly about corporate fleet management or GSA fleet management and their mysterious ways.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        el scotto –

        I don’t know if there is anything official at the corporate level, but we buy a lot of vehicles of all brands from Enterprise. Rental lots are a good source for inexpensive low mileage late model cars, and a lot of the time they’re happy to wholesale to a car lot instead of trying to run one of their own.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        great info, sunridge.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        http://seekingalpha.com/article/846161-general-motors-company-s-management-discusses-august-2012-sales-conference-call-transcript?page=3&p=qanda&l=last

        Gotta look through a lot but here’s GM’s #’s.

        No breakdown of commercial/government but:

        August GM Fleet was 25%
        16% Daily Rental

        YTD thru August GM is 27% fleet
        17% Daily Rental

        In August, Cruze was 30% fleet. But, stepping away from that snapshot… Cruze was low single digits in fleet for July and GM states it will be less then 20% fleet for Cruze for the year. That’s way lower than the Cobalt ever dreamed of being.

        Reading Toyota’s conference calls..they have been 2-5% fleet the last few months but were 15%-20%+ fleet early in the year and expect to be slightly under 10% fleet for the whole year. But, no breakdown of daily rental in those #’s for Toyota.

        Chrysler/Nissan have nothing official at all.

        The transcript above does have interesting comments on truck inventories and general pricing/incentives for those willing to take the time to read the whole thing.

  • avatar
    jaje

    I forgot about the Hyundai workers strike and whether that is affecting supply in any measure.

  • avatar

    I’ll NEVER abandon Chrysler. SRT8 has given me the most reliability and FUN I’ve ever had. Even these foreign cars I’ve owned aren’t nearly as much enjoyment.

  • avatar
    dejal1

    Didn’t someone on the Honda Earth Dreams story a week or so ago say that Honda was failing and didn’t have the right product to sell?

    Does -100% for Saab mean that every new car that was left on the lots when Saab went toes up have been sold? Or they just quit counting because there is no one to ask?

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