By on August 1, 2012

While we are waiting for the U.S. July sales table to populate, let me entertain or bore you with all the numbers from Japan. This was made possible by the , the Japan Mini Vehicles Association finally publishing its outstanding table. Domo arigatou.

Regular vehicle sales Japan July ’12
Manufacturer July ’12 July ’11 YoY YTD ’12 YTD ’11 YoY
Daihatsu 272 316 -13.9% 1,851 1,568 18.0%
Hino 2,929 2,650 10.5% 24,205 16,355 48.0%
Honda 45,627 33,711 35.3% 314,899 209,484 50.3%
Isuzu 4,764 3,559 33.9% 34,998 20,988 66.8%
Lexus 4,481 4,528 -1.0% 27,344 22,273 22.8%
Mazda 16,890 18,035 -6.3% 108,321 83,404 29.9%
Mitsubishi 3,856 4,740 -18.6% 34,344 32,321 6.3%
Mitsubishi Fuso 2,835 2,133 32.9% 21,099 12,640 66.9%
Nissan 44,885 41,810 7.4% 323,296 251,507 28.5%
Subaru 10,191 6,179 64.9% 58,072 41,872 38.7%
Suzuki 8,269 7,131 16.0% 58,814 46,205 27.3%
Toyota 165,666 101,790 62.8% 1,037,149 584,144 77.6%
UD Trucks 600 700 -14.3% 5,445 3,860 41.1%
Other 17,278 14,190 21.8% 135,640 110,030 23.3%
Total 328,543 241,472 36.1% 2,185,477 1,436,651 52.1%

As we well know by now, sales of regular vehicles are only part of the Japanese story.  Two thirds of the story, to be exact ( in a way.)

Mini vehicle sales Japan July ’12
Manufacturer July ’12 July ’11 YoY YTD ’12 YTD ’11 Change
Suzuki 52,048 43,780 18.9% 368,555 269,854 36.6%
Daihatsu 64,790 48,242 34.3% 444,869 299,883 48.3%
Mitsubishi 7,272 7,239 0.5% 54,699 57,560 -5.0%
Subaru 5,458 7,890 -30.8% 52,294 46,440 12.6%
Honda 28,981 10,803 168.3% 190,657 75,217 153.5%
Mazda 4,899 3,146 55.7% 32,986 26,271 25.6%
Nissan 15,063 10,480 43.7% 103,270 80,402 28.4%
Toyota 6,067 0 27,647
Other 4 6 -33.3% 27 25 8.0%
Total 184,582 131,586 40.3% 1,275,004 855,652 49.0%

Sales of mini vehicles add the remaining third of Japanese car sales. Here, we see Toyota’s mini vehicle division Daihatsu still ruling the roost, but as Derek reports after reading just-auto, Suzuki is coming on strong when it comes to keis.

Total vehicle sales Japan July ’12
Manufacturer July ’12 July ’11 YoY MS July ’12 MS July ’11
Daihatsu 65,062 48,558 34.0% 12.7% 13.0%
Hino 2,929 2,650 10.5% 0.6% 0.7%
Honda 74,608 44,514 67.6% 14.5% 11.9%
Isuzu 4,764 3,559 33.9% 0.9% 1.0%
Lexus 4,481 4,528 -1.0% 0.9% 1.2%
Mazda 21,789 21,181 2.9% 4.2% 5.7%
Mitsubishi 11,128 11,979 -7.1% 2.2% 3.2%
Mitsubishi Fuso 2,835 2,133 32.9% 0.6% 0.6%
Nissan 59,948 52,290 14.6% 11.7% 14.0%
Subaru 15,649 14,069 11.2% 3.0% 3.8%
Suzuki 60,317 50,911 18.5% 11.8% 13.6%
Toyota 171,733 101,790 68.7% 33.5% 27.3%
UD Trucks 600 700 -14.3% 0.1% 0.2%
Other 17,282 14,196 21.7% 3.4% 3.8%
Total 513,125 373,058 37.5%

All cars considered, the situation looks like this. In July, that 6,000 unit gap between Suzuki and Nissan shrunk to 369, but Suzuki is still ahead …

Japan Big Three July ’12
Group Toyota Motor Co Nissan Honda
Units July ’12 239,724 59,948 74,608
Units July ’11 152,998 52,290 44,514
Units YoY 56.7% 14.6% 67.6%
MS July ’12 46.7% 11.7% 14.5%
MS July ’11 41.0% 14.0% 11.9%
Units YTD ’12 1,535,721 426,566 505,556
Units YTD ’11 901,950 287,284 289,886
MS YTD ’12 44.4% 12.3% 14.6%
MS YTD ’11 39.3% 12.5% 12.6%
YoY YTD 70.3% 48.5% 74.4%

And here, the all-important group level view.

See, Japanese numbers aren’t that hard at all!

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16 Comments on “And Now, All The Japanese Numbers...”


  • avatar
    racingmaniac

    Technically that’s kanji, which is Chinese characters used in Japanese writing….

    • 0 avatar

      You don’t say …

      • 0 avatar
        Chicago Dude

        Yeah, I came in here to say that those characters were Mandarin, not Japanese.

        They do that in Japan? I studied Mandarin in high school but have no Japanese instruction.

      • 0 avatar
        orick

        And mandarin isn’t a language but a dialect so strictly speaking those are Chinese character. But hey look, suzuki beats Nissan. No one cares?

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      Kanji is not natively Japanese, but no less so than Roman letters used in, say, Spanish. Where Japanese students flooded the west in the last 50 years, the Ming Dynasty (1300’s ish) saw Japanese students flooding Chinese institutes of learning. That was around the time when Japanese imported many of their kanji characters used today (before 500AD, Japanese did not have much of a writing system).

  • avatar
    strafer

    Could’ve sworn Seven is “shichi” in Japanese.

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Both four “shi” and seven “shichi” contain the word “shi”, which means “death”, so most of the time their alternate names “yon” and “nana” are used.

      • 0 avatar
        onyxtape

        It depends on the word. Some combinations just flow better with a “nana” instead of a “shichi”.

        Also, “shichi” and “shi” are Chinese-derived words (as is the rest of the Japanese numbering system), and “nana” and “yon” are native Japanese words. Since the 1950’s, it’s been said that Japanese nationalism manifested itself in their education system by encouraging the increase of use of native Japanese words.

  • avatar
    djsyndrome

    Both are correct. And wait until you get a load of the number four!

  • avatar
    marc

    I would love to know how Lexus is faring compared to the imported Luxury brands.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    Fans of classic anime/manga might want to check out “Maison Ikkoku”, about a college age ronin living in a boarding house in 1980’s Japan. The author had a thing for puns, so each one of the character’s names has a number worked in.

  • avatar
    turbobrick

    123, Itchy Nissan… got it.

  • avatar
    G35X

    Actually the Chinese characters were introduced to Japan much earlier… in the AD200’s by intellectuals fleeing from Korean peninsula as China started losing its control over people there. Thence the name kanji (Han characters). Thereafter, Buddhist missionaries brought scriptures written in the Chinese characters, which themselves are phonetic translation of Sanskrit. The Japanese found the Chinese characters so convenient and started using them in their writing of their own language inventing along the way phonetic signs kana (kind of simplified kanji) and hirakana (streamelined kana). This is the reason why there are two or more pronunciations of a character in Japan – traditional Japanese way and the Chinese way. Since the Chinese let the Japanese use the Chinese characters and other cultural and technological knowledge free of charge, they think they have the right to copy the design of Corolla and other Japanese products, logos and tradenames.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    Getting back to the subject of the post, Isuzu figures are for primarily their heavier trucks, they do not sell SUV’s in Japan. Same with Mitsubishi Fuso(now part of Daimler) and Nissan UD now UD Trucks owned by Volvo.

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