By on December 13, 2011

Acura has confirmed three debuts for the 2012 Detroit Auto Show, ranging from the completely cynical to the terminally hopeful.

First off, there’s going to be a revised RDX. Not a surprise, since the RDX is a CR-V under the skin and there’s a new one of those. Next, we have the “ILX”. Hard-core Acura fans will recall that Acura has sold a variant of the Civic sedan in Canada for quite some time, starting with the 1.8 EL and continuing even unto the third generation with the outgoing CSX, which barely differs from the Civic EX sedan. The ILX will be a new Acura Civic with a twist: the IMA mild-hybrid system will be available for the first time. Autoblog explains that the ILX will compete with the BMW 1 Series. This is fantasy of a sort that would make H. Rider Haggard blush. Also of interest: the ILX will be built at Honda’s Indiana plant.

Last and certainly not least, there will be a new NSX “concept”. Typically, Honda’s idea of a concept is a production car with shiny paint and no license-plate frame, so if the NSX is in concept stage, that’s a very good thing. Honda’s focus on sustainability, green credentials, and so on suggest that the new NSX won’t take the fight to the 458 Italia the way its predecessor did to the Ferrari 348, but we can hope, right?

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94 Comments on “We Three Acuras Of Orient Are (Not Entirely)...”


  • avatar
    jmo

    Autoblog explains that the ILX will compete with the BMW 1 Series. This is fantasy of a sort that would make H. Rider Haggard blush.

    It will among the folks who think that reliability is the only criteria when buying a car.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Who would have never shopped a Bavarian money pit in the first place.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        Not everyone reads CR. As far as I know, most Chinese genuinely believe that MB/BMW are bullet proof in terms of reliability. Some of them may switch to Lexus/Acura if his first German car is indeed a lemon.

    • 0 avatar
      stuntmonkey

      “It will among the folks who think that reliability is the only criteria when buying a car.”

      Close. That’s number two. Us boring folks place not driving a fiery death trap at number one. But otherwise, you nailed in on the head. ;-)

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      Someone that want’s a 1-series but is turned off by BMW reliability would lease it, or would get an Infiniti G or, if they aren’t badge snobs, a Hyundai Genesis Coupe (although they should wait untill next year for that).

      The ILX will continue to fit the current Acura demographic of tech support/help desk people that just got promoted and are too good for their Civics and Accords.

  • avatar
    HiFlite999

    Acura has to be about the most messed up brand on the planet. Even as a gearhead, I have not a clue which random combination of letters relates to which model and have seen nothing from Acura that would inspire me to get out a secret decoder ring to find out.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Ever since I saw a British sci-fi movie and noticed they pronounce UFO as a word (they pronounce it OOF-oh) I’ve started doing it with letter combinations, adding vowels where necessary.

      Try reading the letter models as RiDeX, ILeX, CiSeX, and NiSex. It might make it easier to remember which are the sedans, coupes, hatches, and glorified wagons.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Especially screwed up since there is no Honda turbo or direct injection.

      I’m waiting for the electric Ridgeline pickup, Acura style.

      • 0 avatar
        tced2

        The RDX has a turbo-charged 2.3L engine (about 240hp). The CRV-Honda has a 2.4L normally aspirated engine (about 200hp).

      • 0 avatar
        acuraandy

        @NormSV650, don’t hold your breath. I’ve already bugged our dealership District rep about that, not only will Honda not build an ‘Acura Ridgeline’, the Ridgeline itself is near dead.

        Think Lincoln Blackwood or LT.

    • 0 avatar
      tced2

      Of course what’s an Impala? a deer? or a Chevy
      a Highlander? a person who lives in the Highlands? or a Toyota
      a Maxima? a made up name by a marketing expert? or a Nissan
      Car names are meaningless.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        tced2 – you have a point, but with some alphanumeric names like the Lincoln ones I have to really try and think what it is. MKS – sedan, makes sense, MKX – crossover, OK, but then MKT and MKZ. Acura also has this issue – I can see TL, but TSX, RDX, MDX when M is earlier in the alphabet than R but is a larger SUV and the ZDX. Z as in the ultimately stupid vehicle?
        Names can be meaningless too but not all of them, especially when used consistently like Camry, Corolla, Silverado, Focus, Civic etc everyone knows that car you are talking about.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        @mike978

        MKZ makes sense if you recall what the car was called for the first year or two of its production. I remember that the Zephyr (which I personally really like, can’t explain it though) came out, but then they changed it to MKZ after a year or two for reasons that I don’t know (I wasn’t paying attention to the car scene very much). MKT makes sense if you consider the vehicle to which it is attached a truck.

        It was a commentor on this site that made the connection before, and it’s been ingrained in my brain ever since.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        The Zephyr name originally comes from mythology, but in this case is derived from the streamlined passenger trains of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad, named for their innovative and fast train of 1934. The railroad ran a whole fleet of them, I rode the California Zephyr, a Chicago – Oakland train on short trips in 1970 before it was cancelled, but Amtrak resurrected the name and runs it over almost the same route.

        Other names derived from animals, such as Impala, are meant to inspire swiftness and sleekness. That may no longer be representative of current cars bearing those names, but I like to connect with a name rather than meaningless alpha-numerics, unless there’s a badge on the trunk lid and sides that reads: SS 396, SS 427 or Galaxie 500. Now those I DO understand!

      • 0 avatar
        dave-the-rave

        There was a Lincoln Zephyr in the 1940’s, I believe.

      • 0 avatar
        KalapanaBlack

        “Maxima” is not made up. It is the plural of “maximum.” Like many Latin-based words, “-um” is singular and “-a” is plural.

        Of course, this makes it technically gramatically incorrect to talk about a single Maxima. Oh well.

        Just thank goodness Datsun didn’t name the Sentra the “Minima.” Think about the brand equity in that!

    • 0 avatar

      Well not so fast. It is in good company of Lincoln, Mercury, Pontiac and Oldsmobile. Oops Mercury, Olds and Pontiac are no more. Kind of tendency I see there.

  • avatar
    highrpm

    If we were back in 1989, I’d be very excited right now, seeing as how we were about to get an awesome entry-level Acura and an aluminum NSX.

    In 2011, I can only muster a “meh” about this. The Acura Civic will not break new hp-per-liter ground, and the new NSX will not outrun a Skyline or Ferrari.

  • avatar
    Dan

    That’s Honda, the how and why company.

    Engineering that makes you wonder how. Combined with product planning that makes you wonder why.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      It used to not be that way, they sure have been struggling for the past decade or so. They never needed to stray from their product lines, and they don’t need to be a BMW trying to explore niches that the market hasn’t desired.

      I’ve enjoyed the 2 Acuras I’ve had (90 Integra, 98 3.2TL), but I don’t see any I’d really favor (not even a 3rd generation TL-S). Ford and Subaru have my interest in the mainstream categories (Focus, Outback/Legacy, upcoming Fusion) and Cadillac in the entry-level luxury (CTS). Honda/Acura are not putting out products that could be considered as the “gold standard” anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      Engineering that makes you wonder how.

      Not so much any more – they’ve gotten lazy and complacent.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Car and Driver is reporting that the next 1-series will be built on a stretched Mini Cooper platform, which makes the Civic based ILX seem like a potential competitor whatever a shopper’s criteria are. As awful as the BMWs of today are compared to the BMWs of yesterday, the BMWs of tomorrow will make people nostalgic for them.

    • 0 avatar
      A Caving Ape

      I’m generally pretty staunchly anti-debt, but I’ve done some serious math to check the financial feasibility of getting a new 328i wagon. I somehow don’t see it surviving in 2012.

      (sadly there’s no way I can afford that note, but maybe in a few years I’ll find one on the used market… with a stick…. in RWD…. a man can dream, right?)

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Good luck, I think thats the magical combo that krhodes had to special order brand new. Maybe he will sell you his in a few years?? :)

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I highly suggest that you sell an organ if needs be – the 328i Wagon may be the most perfect car on Earth. Nothing else drives like a 3-series, and the wagon adds a very useful amount of extra space. If you go light on the options, the price is not too terrible (considering what you get), and what is not there will never break… And even CR rates the 328i “above average” in reliability. Nothing has fallen off mine in the first 7500 miles, which I cannot say for my ’08 Saab 9-3SC.

        If they stop selling them, I will be buried in mine. Well, perhaps half in the Bimmer and half in my Spitfire. But the good news is rumours keep surfacing that BMW has seen the errors of its no wagons ways. The 5GT has been a disaster, and the folks who bought 5 wagons have been buying E-class wagons.

        As to Acura, I give them 1/2 kudos for bringing the Euro Accord wagon over. Only 1/2 because they are autotragic-only. The sort of people who still buy wagons are also the sorts who buy manual transmissions.

  • avatar
    dasko

    It was actually the 1.6EL, then the 1.7EL and lastly the CSX. Sorry Jack, no 1.8EL. I am Canadian, and not a die hard Acura fan south of the border.

  • avatar
    cmoibenlepro

    My guess is that the NSX concept will be a rebadged CR-Z.

    • 0 avatar

      NSX is Acura only for clueless Americans. For rest of the world it is (or was) known as Honda NSX. So these are actually two amigos not three and I am not even sure in that. Rest two might also be Honda magic wand turning European Hondas (which are not LUXURY car by any means and do not compete with BMW – what a joke, may be with Opel and Toyota)into “luxury” Acuras.

  • avatar
    orick

    as a first gen TSX owner and an admirer of the old Integra and NSX…..

    a green focused NSX? seriously? I hope they mean “we will put some bamboo interior trims in this thing and put in some sort hybrid system for more torque”, and not “we are aiming for fuel economy and not performance.”

    • 0 avatar
      Sketch

      For it’s market segment, the NSX was a pretty green car. I always got significantly better mileage than the EPA numbers (originally 17/24, now formulaiccaly downgraded to 16/22). I averaged 20mpg, and got about 28mpg on the highway. And I did not drive it at all slowly, though I did keep it under 90mph most of the time…

      According to some people, if you keep it close to 55 and drive it gently, you can get over 30mpg on the highway. Try that with the 348 it was benchmarked against (which is currently listed by the EPA as 12/17).

      As long as they don’t put economy over performance, I’m interested to see what they offer. Especially since it sounds like it might be a real NSX this time, rather than a GTR/LFA wannabe.

  • avatar
    djsyndrome

    So there are Civics being built in Canada and this made-for-Canada special (it will be dead within two years in the States) is made in America.

    Well, at least it’s not just the engineering and styling departments at Honda that have lost their minds.

  • avatar
    wsn

    The demise of Honda/Acura has been greatly exaggerated. Honda never needed bailout. Didn’t lose money in the worst situation (natural disaster + Yen). Honda’s stock performed better than the old GM, and the new GM. Honda still is either number 1 or 2 in compact sedan, midsize sedan, compact CUV, minivan. If you do see a market share decline in a certain segment, it’s because a competitor is piling cash on the hood to move metal, which can only be temporary. Talking about Honda not building car the way they do 20 years ago, it’s just false. I can’t think of any 10 year old car by GM that can even remotely match its counterpart at Honda.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      “Honda still is either number 1 or 2 in compact sedan, midsize sedan, compact CUV, minivan” – in the US market. Shame they are not like that in other major markets – Europe (as big as US market) or China. They can be profitable as a smaller player – Subaru and BMW manage it. But lets not judge them by their standing in the US (although still below 10%) and even you have to admit Acura has been badly handled the last few years.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        Honda is No.1 in China’s midsize segment, with the Accord beating both Camry and Passat. Each Accord sells for 3x ~ 5x the price of a VW or GM sub-compact.

        Honda’s standing in the US (8%~10% varying) is remarkable, considering that GM only got 18% and that this is GM’s home turf and GM employs far more people. May I ask what’s GM’s share in Japan? Exactly.

        As for Acura, at least in my town (in Canada), CSX sales are quite good, in addition to the MDX, which probably outsell the Camry.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        wsn – Why don`t you compare Honda’s market share to Toyota’s. Both came to the US around the same time, both are Japanese and both have a reputation (deservedly) for reliable cars. Toyota outsells Honda greatly. Hell even Chrysler has come back to outsell Honda (shocking to me). I know you are an ardent Honda fan, I don`t have a dog in this fight.

        Yes GM (along with every other imported manufacturer) is small in Japan. So. Japan is a small market. The markets I listed are comparable in size – US, EU and China. GM is consistent in c. 10%+ in each market. Honda is good in the US, EU is 1% and China is also well below GM and VW and others.

        With regards to them selling Accords, great and I easily believe that is more profitable than selling compacts but lets look at the final metric the profitability of the host company and GM is at least as good as Honda there. Admittedly you don`t have to be huge to make a good profit – Porsche and BMW have shown this.

        I am glad you live in a place where Acura is doing well. Just look at its US sales and it is more like Lincoln than Lexus.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        mike978, you still don’t get it. If they wanted, Honda could easily match Toyota or GM’s unit output, simply by buying a lot of crappy auto partners. For instance, if instead of GM, Honda bought the WuLing unit, that will instantly make Honda China output more than GM China. But it just doesn’t make sense to Honda’s bottom line and reputation.

        GM, on the other hand, took the cheap route that will increase the output number. But if anything, it only hurts the company. Because whatever junk they buy today (i.e. Chinese WuLing), they will discard at a cost in the future (i.e. Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Saturn, Hummer, Saab). Just look at how the companies are valued as of today:

        Toyota $104B
        VW $66B
        Honda $55B
        Hyundai $45B
        GM $32B (after a $50B bailout)

        Honda is the 3rd largest auto company in the world by value. Considering the operation size, it’s probably the strongest (i.e. smallest operation for the most value).

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      wsn, a decade ago a friend said “Can’t go wrong buying a Honda.” What she meant was the combination of good reliability, well thought out packaging, advanced engines, and conservative inoffensive styling resulted in years of good service and good resale value. Since then Hondas have become larger and heavier, some Honda automatic transmissions have been unreliable, and the styling has gone from conservative to weird. The Civic and Accord models are no longer better than their peers. Interior packaging is no longer efficient and interior plastics show clear signs of cost cutting.

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        The faulty automatic transmissions affected 1999-04 Hondas and Acuras equipped with a V-6 engine.

        The torque converters on 2005-07 Odyssseys were also problematic, but this can supposedly be solved with a software upgrade.

        At this point, the transmission problems are solved.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        George B: “The Civic and Accord models are no longer better than their peers.”

        A 2001 Civic is still better than almost every other compact car of the same vintage. Peer, what peer (other than Toyota Corolla)? Would you really call a 2001 Caliber/Cobalt peer of Civic? Seriously?

        As for MY 2011, Detroit fans can claim all they want about how GM has caught up. But I have heard enough of that BS in the past 20 years. My money will be on that 2011 Civic is still a far superior car than a 2011 Cruze in year 2021.

      • 0 avatar
        fvfvsix

        wsn- the problem you are ignoring is the fact that a 2011 Civic is not as good a car as a 2001 Civic was, on any enthusiast-focused measure. I don’t want to hear about fuel economy and safety equipment… The 8th gen Civic just isn’t as good as the 6th gen was when you look at engine refinement, driving enjoyment, exterior design, and interior materials.

        Before you ask, I’ve owned a 1995 Civic, a 1998 Civic, a 2002 Civic, and a 2009. I feel qualified to give my opinions on the Civic’s evolution.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        fvfvsix, the Civic isn’t really about “enthusiast-focused”. It may have harsher suspensions than the Corolla, but that’s about it. Its real value is all about economy and longevity. In that regard, it is still at the top until proven otherwise.

        From a 2002 Civic owner who defected to Subaru.

    • 0 avatar

      Japanese market is not only small but is also irrelevant and is dying away. I do not see any reason for GM, Ford, Hyundai and etc, well even Nissan, to care about Japanese market and go though all the hurdles exporting cars into import unfriendly market.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    Jack should have linked to Jeff @ TOV’s report from the Acura press briefing: http://vtec.net/news/news-item?news_item_id=1020643

    The new ILX seems horribly cynical and the name is just unforgivably awful. I could see a Civic-platform K24-engined car as a new entry level Acura, but sharing the R20 with the Civic means that this is much more likely to just be a Mercury-esque badge engineering exercise. Then again, if Acura were to just drop the stupid Scrabble-draw names and call it the Integra, they probably wouldn’t be able to build enough of them.

    The new NSX, on the other hand… well, I’ll just quote from the TOV report: “Acura wouldn’t tell us anything about the engine or powertrain, but off the record they were quick to tell us that the announced Electric SH-AWD system with 3.5L DI V6 was clearly not potent enough for this car. It should be noted that THAT powertrain, with its 7-speed dual clutch gearbox and 3 electric motors, develops a peak output in the neighborhood of 400hp. Obviously with the MR layout, Honda has to engineer a very specific setup for this car, and we’re assuming it will essentially be a reversed layout compared to the FF-oriented design which was revealed previously.”

    The new RL with the through-the-road SH-AWD hybrid system sounds very interesting too. Here’s hoping it’s not ugly. Again, bringing back the Legend name would help a lot. Does anyone at Honda actually want Acura to succeed?

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      My fellow RL owners and I (all three of us, right?) remain utterly mystified as to why they don’t return to calling it the Legand (they’ve never stopped doing so in Japan).

      I guess some bright boy in the ’90s read some research that the names “Legend” and “Integra” had more brand equity with consumers than “Acura” did. So their perfectly logical answer was to trash the two brand names that had the most equity, and invest about 35 cents into building the name that had the least.

      Everybody went to alphanumeric names in the luxury segment because the Germans had them, period. Just like Lexus made the LS look like a Mercedes S-Class because Mercedes’ car looked like… well, like a Mercedes S-Class. Except the BMW scheme at least made some intuitive sense at the time: 3, 5, 7. (Now. less so.) But utterly random combinations of alphabet soup have no chance of being remembered individually. I work in a branding-related profession, and this is just retarded.

    • 0 avatar
      acuraandy

      To my knowledge the current-gen Civic still have the 1.8l, not the R20.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      3.5L V6 with hybrid boost isn’t enough? Now I’m thinking the car will have Honda’s first production V8. Just in time to compete with the upcoming 918 hybrid and it’s small-displacement V8.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    At this point, NSX concepts are just a cruel joke. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on “the economy”. I refuse to be fooled thrice. No excitement until these things actually go into production. Actually I should go further… no excitement until the NSX is available as a street legal road car.

  • avatar
    Feds

    Acura LIX? I hope it comes in “Smoke on the Water” or “Fresh Cream” paint.

  • avatar
    getacargetacheck

    Honda might be better off phasing out Acura and instead introducing a TL-based “Legend” and maybe a sports car at Honda dealers. Something similar should be considered for Infiniti (e.g., a G sedan-based Maxima for further differentiation between it and the Altima). These made up “luxury” names have had their day. Hopefully Hyundai never goes down this road.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      These made up “luxury” names have had their day. Hopefully Hyundai never goes down this road.

      Infinity and Lexus sales and service are so much better than what you get at a Toyota or Nissan dealer, I don’t think you are correct.

      Just a personal anecdote – a friend was looking at an Avalon vs. a ES 350 and was totally put off by the (right out of central casting) pinky ringed, sleaze ball, Toyota sales manager. The Lexus sales experience was nothing but courteous and professional. I think that’s pretty common.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        jmo – that is a good point about the sales/service experience and one I have observed too.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Indeed – don’t discount this.

        Having bought a BMW this year, and helped my Mom buy a couple cars last year, the difference in the shopping/buying experience between the BMW dealer and the non-premium brands was night and day. Though interestingly, she got very similar service at the VW/Audi/Porsche dealer, and has now bought three VWs from them (long story having nothing to do with the quality of the cars).

      • 0 avatar
        baggins

        I’ll never understand why someone makes a decision on 30+K car that he is going to drive for 5-10 years based on the 2-3 hour interactions with a sales rep. Its like choosing a university based on the janitor in the dorm.

        Or buy like I do, strictly over internet, then show up, sign the papers and be on your way in one hour.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        I’ll never understand why someone makes a decision on 30+K car that he is going to drive for 5-10 years based on the 2-3 hour interactions with a sales rep.

        I have a friend who bought himself an S 550 as a retirement present to himself. You want that experience to be special and if you have to spend a few hours dealing with an incompetent shyster then it diminishes the experience.

        Or buy like I do, strictly over internet, then show up, sign the papers and be on your way in one hour.

        You don’t test drive before you buy?

        In my case, being tossed the keys at VW and being told to come back whenever really allowed me to experience and enjoy the car alone. At Toyota, I had some high pressure hack badgering me the whole ride and it totally effected how much I liked the car.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Ugh. More meaningless alphanumeric names. Bring back Legend and Integra. What the hell is an ILX anyway?

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    The whole reason for the EL/CSX up here was to give Acura dealers something to eat of off because of the lesser amounts of disposable income we Canucks apparently have. Seeing where Lexus is headed now, it’s not such a bad strategy. Typical Honda… they do the right thing, only they do it too soon, so that they don’t get credit for it. It’s like the CVCC engine… great solution to emissions, but nobody else had one and the emissions laws never changed in the time that it mattered for that Civic.

    Same with now, Honda keeps looking at a time when cars and oil are going to be really expensive and the world economy is going to be in flames (which it will) and nobody can afford the nice stuff that we had before. It’s just that they have a way of doing it early before the trouble actually happens. Like how they sold their F-1 team to Brawn, who eventually went on to win the championship. It was the right decision because the economy did tank in the biggest way, but by the time it happened, Honda didn’t get the credit for unloading a pretty significant cost.

    Those of us with mortgages and kids and whatnot and who don’t live next to a race track, or pretend our city streets are ones, this is pretty much the kind of car we want… just a right amount of practical luxury in an economical car that won’t make us look like fools in front of our financial advisers.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      when cars and oil are going to be really expensive and the world economy is going to be in flames (which it will) and nobody can afford the nice stuff that we had before.

      The economic reality, even in Canada, but true throughoutt the world is one of the educated and skilled doing increasingly well and the uneducated and unskilled getting hammered. The reality may very well be a growing market for luxury cars – not a shrinking one.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        Maybe “polarizing” (even for luxury cars) is the better word.

        P.S. As of right now in this northern Canadian city, half million residential lots are literally flying off the shelf. You have to contact the land developer for the next phase release date to get the lot you really want. Who says that lots are becoming smaller and smaller? Some land developers are releasing larger and larger lots (for more money, of course). Oh, BTW, the average price for single houses is only $360k.

  • avatar
    jpcavanaugh

    We are certainly versatile here in Indiana. In South Bend, our Studebaker plant built Packards. In Lafayette, our Subaru plant builds Toyotas. And now our Greensburg Honda plant will build Acuras.

    I hope that the Accu-Civic will be an improvement on the regular Civic.

  • avatar
    jtk

    Here’s hoping the ILX does not share the split dash with the Civic.

    Also, does this replace the TSX?

    • 0 avatar
      carlisimo

      The two Accords (US and Euro) are going to merge into one model in the next generation, so I’d expect the TSX to disappear.

      • 0 avatar
        acuraandy

        @carlismo, If this happens, even with the ‘ILX’ or whatever the f*** you want to call it, Acura is DEAD IN THE WATER. AND THIS IS COMING FROM AN EMPLOYEE.

        TSX has and will continue to be Acura’s volume car, at least in the USDM, due to the fact that people want the Euro/JDM Accord; because it truely is a good car.

        Honda only imports TSX because there is a market for it, and is channeled through Acura ONLY to charge a premium. Merge the two models, and might as well stick a fork in my employer, it’s done.

    • 0 avatar
      stuntmonkey

      The split dash is a good idea, (and helps accommodate sight lines for a a smaller steering wheel) but the top readout should have been a redundant display, with the main bin having both conventional tach and speed gauges. I still think there are worse designs out there, like the Mini (where is the speedo?) or the Prius (where is everything?)

      • 0 avatar
        jtk

        I haven’t driven a Mini or a Prius, but I have driven a Civic with the split dash for about a week… I just could not get used to it. It never felt natural to look at either location and I had to kind of search around to get whatever info I was looking for. I’m not a big fan of the digital speedo either.

        I suspect this is a sign of old age and general grouchiness setting in, but I just cannot consider a car without some semblance of traditional gauges.

      • 0 avatar
        fvfvsix

        Owned our ’09 since new, and I still hate the split dash. One thing I wish they would have changed for the 9th gen. Certainly detracts from an otherwise good car – yet still not as good as the ’90’s Civics

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Also, does this replace the TSX?

      According to Auto Week, it does.

  • avatar
    acuraandy

    Great…corporate didn’t tell us the ILX was supposed to be a hybrid. Now I need hybrid training? UGH….

    I’m thinking its time for me to change industries.

  • avatar
    Amendment X

    Ok, I’m in full agreement that the current alphabet-soup naming scheme adopted by the luxury auto companies is completely moronic. But can we stop bitching about this for just a second?

    It’s pretty clear, names aside, that the ILX is the new Integra. If it’s a small sporty car based on the Civic, then it’s picking up where the Integra left off. Forgetting about the name for just a second, this should be exciting to Integra fans (assuming Honda doesn’t make it look like the ZDX or some other hideous Acura design). It’s nice to see that Honda is finally learning that they can’t compete with the big boys until they start at the ground-level compact premium luxury segment, which ironically, they were doing when they used to build the Integra.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Not exactly… this isnt a new idea, they have had the CSX in Canada for a while, and historically is a rebadged Civic. Although the Integra and RSX always shared a platform with the Civic, it was extremely well-disguised, honestly I never could tell that they were the same chassis before, nothing looked the same even to my car-obsessed brain. The interiors were better, the powertrain was better, performance was better.

      Now if this new “ILX” is more developed than the CSX has been, then great, maybe it will be the new Integra. But I doubt it…

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        But CSX has been selling well. The end of the CSX name is not likely due to poor sales. The renaming is probably due to their focus group believing ILX makes more sense to Americans (instead of Canadians).

      • 0 avatar
        Amendment X

        If they’re making it a 1-series competitor, it’s not going to be a Civic with leather interior. I’d expect much more, even from Honda.

        And regarding the name, although this is completely anecdotal, I think I heard that Acura couldn’t secure the naming rights to “CSX” in the United States because of the CSX railway company.

  • avatar
    tubacity

    Not solved.

    Someone claimed , “The faulty automatic transmissions affected 1999-04 Hondas and Acuras equipped with a V-6 engine.
    The torque converters on 2005-07 Odyssseys were also problematic, but this can supposedly be solved with a software upgrade.
    At this point, the transmission problems are solved.”

    Not true. I have a 1999-04. Shifts funkier by the day. Already trans replaced before. Not solved. Software upgrade to 05-07 Odyssey often does not solve the problem. Problem not solved.

    • 0 avatar
      acuraandy

      @TubaCity, CHANGE YOUR FLUID. :)

      • 0 avatar
        tubacity

        Fluid changed 10thousand miles ago. Not often enough?

      • 0 avatar
        acuraandy

        With my Accord and my brother’s Civic, I change the fluid every third oil change. NO trans issues.

        Call it cheap insurance. :)

      • 0 avatar
        tubacity

        Not Cheap. Not Insurance.
        Someone said,”With my Accord and my brother’s Civic, I change the fluid every third oil change. NO trans issues.
        Call it cheap insurance. :)”

        Been there done that. Bad result. Bought Honda new. Changed AT Fluid after 3rd oil change and every other oil change until the trans took a crap below 70thousand. Only Z1. Prevented nothing.

        Not Cheap. Not insurance. Just another lousy honda trans.

      • 0 avatar
        acuraandy

        Sorry to hear that. I guess i’ve just been lucky so far. My Accord has 187k on original trans, my bro’s Civic around 100k.

        And no, on MDX and Odyssey it was originally a programming fubar. Unfortunately, if the damage is already done, its done.

        As with ANY car, if you can help it, get a manual trans. Far less issues.

    • 0 avatar
      NotFast

      I never understood why Honda replaced the glass tranny with another glass tranny. This is why I traded in my TL: I knew eventually it would be MY $$ to replace it.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      The transmission problems are solved in that the ones built since 2005 do not have these problems. And a software upgrade does solve the problem with the 2005-07 Odyssey.

      • 0 avatar
        acuraandy

        And 2005-06 MDX. To clarify, this is a torque converter lockup PCM reflash. We’ve been doing them for almost two years, and have dramatically reduced torque converter replacements.

      • 0 avatar
        tubacity

        Or does the software update merely delay lockup to higher speed to increase engine rpm and hide the shuddering problem until after warranty expires and the customer no longer comes to the dealer.

  • avatar
    zone

    @ jmo:

    “Autoblog explains that the ILX will compete with the BMW 1 Series. This is fantasy of a sort that would make H. Rider Haggard blush.

    It will among the folks who think that reliability is the only criteria when buying a car.”

    IF I had unlimited finances I’d have several cars. But the one I can afford has to be one that “does it all.”
    As in an interesting design, good performance, good handling, nice interior, and EXCELLENT RELIABILITY.
    To me, nothing give me buyers-remorse more than having to talk to some dealership service manager because of a problem with my car – and everything that goes along with it to get it repaired. 1-Series is a nice car, but yeah, I’m starting to really question BMW’s, Audi’s and VW’s record of reliability. Can this Acura compete – well let’s first see it at DAS and see what it looks like and take it from there.

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