By on April 1, 2011

Bugatti’s jumping onto the high-po four-door bandwagon, as its parent company Volkswagen has approved its Galibier concept for production, according to Automotive News [sub]. Initial specs: 1,000 HP and a $1.4m pricetag. All other questions should be directed to the video above.

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19 Comments on “Bugatti Four-Door Approved For Production...”


  • avatar
    cmoibenlepro

    $1.4m ?  OK, I’ll take 3.

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    There is a Bugatti Royale in the Museum of Modern Art. This thing will not be displayed next to it.

  • avatar
    JJ

    The car reminds of this car I saw in a Volkswagen Magazine my grandfather had years ago;

    http://www.manager-magazin.de/unternehmen/artikel/0,2828,grossbild-55701-144834,00.html

    Pretty similar shape and concept…Only it would have been at least 7 times less expensive.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    My recollection – and it could have just been conjecture on Car and Driver‘s part – was that Bugatti originally intended on producing a luxury sedan ten years ago or so, but then decided that people would only pay so much for a sedan, whereas they’d happily shell out over $1mil for a sports car – hence the Veyron.
    Maybe five years of aftermarket gold-, velvet- and diamond-studded Veyrons have finally made them realize just how tacky and willing to blow money on utter crap some people really are.

  • avatar
    twotone

    What about the dealer incentives and lease deals?

  • avatar
    eldard

    Looks good. Too bad it’s still a glorified Volkswagen. I’ll take one with EMP horn, please!!!

  • avatar
    sfdennis1

    Wow, and to think they managed to make it 14x pudgier looking than a Panamera for only 14x the price! Talk about value for the money…

    This Faberge egg/Gilded Turd is the very definition of “more money than taste”…of course, most will be sold to Middle East Oilagarchs, 3rd World Despots, Russian Mobsters, Lead-paint-laden toy manufacturing Chinese tycoons, and Deluded-“birther” Trump wannabees…in short, the dregs of humanity.

    Were I Master of the Universe, each and every purchaser of said vehicle would get the “learning opportunity” to be reincarnated, oh say 14 times, as a starving child in the Sahara desert, or better yet, the Mother of that starving child, as penance.

    But as I’m obviously not M.O.T.U., relax and drive it (or more likely, be chauffered in it) in good health…at least until the local peasants rise up and rip you limb from limb…but until then, hey, it’s all good!

    • 0 avatar

      haters gonna hate

      Edit: it’s you who’s Deluded. And a bigoting blanket-stater stereotyper. What of all those who earned their Galibiers?

    • 0 avatar

      Why punish a rich person just because there is no civil society in the Sahara? If there are any children starving in the Sahara it’s because of corruption by others in that society, not because some rich guy wants a 1,000 HP car.
       
      Why does a rich person have to do “penance” because they bought a nice toy? I don’t know any mobsters or oligarchs but I have known some wealthy American folks and they are just like everyone else – except they give a lot more to philanthropic causes.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I don’t know any mobsters or oligarchs but I have known some wealthy American folks and they are just like everyone else – except they give a lot more to philanthropic causes.

      That they are rich is largely the result of the society they live in and benefit from. Private property rights, law enforcement, contracts, regulations, the courts, the roads that allow the movement of goods, etc, etc: the rich benefit from these things far more than the not-rich, and do so on the backs of, well, everyone else.  “The rich” in places where these services are not provided have to pay a lot more to provide security and infrastructure to enable and protect their wealth.  Here, those services are socialized.

      I think stfdennis‘ point is that it’s more than a little gauche to purchase something like this, and that perhaps it would be good for people who do to understand that there’s a social contract they’re part of and that they need to keep their end up of, and not just through coughing up money to pet causes for a tax write-off.

      I don’t think they shouldn’t be allowed to buy something like this, but they (and people who defend them) ought to be man (or woman) enough to accept criticism for a vulgar lack of taste.  A free society includes the right to be freely criticized.

    • 0 avatar

      That they are rich is largely the result of the society they live in and benefit from. Private property rights, law enforcement, contracts, regulations, the courts, the roads that allow the movement of goods, etc, etc:

      Not necessarily. There have been wealthy and powerful (not the same thing, btw) people in places that didn’t respect property rights, contracts or have just courts.
       
      the rich benefit from these things far more than the not-rich,

      Who says that a poor person doesn’t benefit from private property rights, law enforcement, contracts? If anything, because they have fewer assets and fewer opportunities to contract, protecting the property and contract rights of the poor benefits them disproportionately. A rich man can afford losing a piece of property in a contract dispute, a poor person cannot.
       
      In the Torah, there is a prohibition against keeping a poor person’s cloak as collateral overnight. That cloak may be their only asset of value, but they need it to keep from freezing at night. Property is much more important to the poor than to the rich.
       
      and do so on the backs of, well, everyone else.

      Actually, in America, the rich pay a disproportionate burden of taxes. That means everyone else is getting by on the backs of the wealthy and corporations (the US has about the highest corporate tax rate in the world).
       
      Other than members of the lucky sperm club, people get rich by creating wealth. While the things you mentioned are important in order to have fair markets, none of them creates any wealth. Entrepreneurial ideas create wealth. Invention (in a wide sense) creates wealth.
       
      If you have two identical enterprises, with the same equipment, number of employees with the same skills and experience, same facilities and same access to capital. The only difference is the idea behind the businesses. In your world, you think that those ideas all have the same value, which is nothing in your eyes, because you subscribe to the marxist labor theory of value. In my ideal world, the entrepreneur with the more successful idea should reap the benefits of his creativity.
       
       
       

    • 0 avatar
      sfdennis1

      @RS
      I personally know and have worked for some very wealthy people myself…(as in a net worth in the hundreds of millions of dollars)…and my former boss(es) were actually very decent human beings who DO/DID contribute generously to charitable causes…and they wouldn’t be caught DEAD wasting their (combination of earned and inherited) wealth on this $1.4 million testament to conspicuous consumption, ego vanity, and vulgarity…If one truly has ‘nothing to prove’, a nice S-Class (or BMW 7Series, Audi A8, etc) does just fine as a transportation device, as it did for my former employer.

      I still assert that if one is obscenely wealthy, and “needs” to show off in more than a Rolls Phantom….that individual maybe, possibly, might just be a  Doooshbaaag…but hey, that’s just my opinion. However, if I hit the Powerball tomorrow I can guarantee how at least $1.4 million of it ISN’T going to be spent.

      As for this…
      “Actually, in America, the rich pay a disproportionate burden of taxes. That means everyone else is getting by on the backs of the wealthy and corporations (the US has about the highest corporate tax rate in the world).”

      Blah Blah Blah, whatever cliche you want to spin, pal….I don’t take my talking points from Fox Business News.

      I do know that it’s been proven that income inequality is the highest it’s been in several decades, and that lower income and middle income Americans are GENUINELY struggling to get by…and I also know that corporations have teams of (highly paid) tax experts allowing them to find EVERY tax (cheat) loophole possible, so forgive me if I fail to honor the crocodile tears you apparently shed for victimized wealthy billionaires, and the poor, poor put upon (record profit making) corporations.

  • avatar
    Uncle Mellow

    This looks so much nicer than a Veyron, but why 1000 HP ? I’d be perfectly happy with a 500HP one. It is supposed to feature light-weight construction , so it shouldn’t need a monster engine.

  • avatar
    CraigSu

    OK, those headlamps are really creeping me out.  They seem to be staring at me from every angle.

  • avatar

    I wonder if Lance Armstrong will buy one.
     
    http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/01/road/flashback-gallery-the-col-du-galibier-in-the-2005-tour-de-france_156502/attachment/armstrongcrop-tm

  • avatar
    PriusV16

    Good thing they’re not trying to promote the thing with overly pretentious “teaser ads”…… *g
     
    So what will this thing be based on? Panamera? Phaeton? I guess it won’t be the Passat, or …wait….. will it…..?
     
    The problem, on a more serious note, is utterly obvious here and has already been mentioned above. Whatever the thing will be priced at, it’ll always be a rather bland-looking Volkswagen, with Volkswagen technology underneath, and the reputation of being a Volkswagen-Bugatti.
     
    It’ll be for those new-rich people who don’t really have taste and a real understanding for heritage, but who’ll instead buy anything if it’s just flashy and shiny and pretentious enough so they can hope for making some sort of impression on those bystanders who are equally clueless.
     
    Pretentious. This thing is the embodiment of that word’s definition.

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