By on April 25, 2011

149 vehicles were sold in 1 hour. From a 2008 Mercedes C300 Sport with 71k that went for $21,400 (plus fee) to a 1998 Lincoln Town Car Executive with 263k that went for $1,600. Seeing that one go down the line for that price made me feel pretty good. I had bought a mint one with 100,000 fewer miles for the same price the week before. But by the end of the day I felt pretty crappy overall. Why?

I am competing against over 100 dealers for the same frigging car! What’s the point? When I see a ratted out 1995 Volvo 940 wagon go for $1600, and it’s worth maybe $700 wholesale, why should I even bother? There was a frame damaged 2006 Audi A8 L that went for $25,000. That was nice to look at if you’re not used to identifying resprays and substandard repairs. To be frank, there were only a precious few cream puffs at this sale.

A 2001 Cadillac DHS with only 57,000 miles went for $6400. Either you need to already have a rabid buyer on the hook for that vehicle. Or you need a finance company that only requires a pulse and a paycheck to make that work. You finance it for $10,000. The company cuts you a check for $9,000, and you enjoy the freedom. Wait, that was five years ago. Today you’re toting the note with a GPS and a diasbler.

There was one vehicle that did interest me. A 2006 Scion Tc. I used to re-sell Celicas more than any other tpye of car. This one may as well be called a Scion Celica. Everything from the controversial design to the sport touring nature of them is indicative of the Celica heritage. That is except the last gen Celica which was a true boy-racer type for some young adults and a lot of middle-aged secretaries.

With no title, but no announcements, the 76,000 mile Celica in drag sold for $8,000. Five-speed. Very nice interior. But a base model without even a sunroof. Throw in the fee and the handshaker, and you’ve got a car that’s going to look good sitting at a lot for a long period of time.

But then again maybe not. Latinos tend to be far more experienced with manuals and the buyer du jour specialized in that clientele. It wasn’t cheap. But during tax time nothing is.

 

 

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62 Comments on “Auction Monday: Carmax...”


  • avatar
    CJinSD

    I thought the sunroof was standard on the early Scion tC models, a tribute to the first Preludes which really only had the sunroof to make them sportier than Accords or Civics.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    That certainly sounded like a beautiful day in the neighborhood!

    It appears no one really wins at this stuff anymore, taking into consideration this and your earlier article about a car auction. Too many bombs sell for ‘way more money than they’re worth, which means a potential buyer – in this case, lower-income bracket, perhaps, gets stuck with an over-priced car that he can’t really afford, only made possible by payments that he can barely make. Little comfort that he can’t afford a new Aveo or an entry-level Kia which would be a much better value, but the economics slam him each and every time. I’m talking about someone who’s actually resposible, too. Sadly, too often, the opposite seems to be true.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    Ditto… I thought all Tc’s had sunroofs standard… guess you learn something new every day.  But I had a last gen Celica, that was a GREAT car.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    No your memories are all correct. That Tc did have a sunroof. I remember testing the thing out before the sale. But when I looked at the notes on the auction run list, no sunroof was listed. Just the 5-speed and alloy wheels.

  • avatar
    heywood220

    this article just sums up my day job, going to the auction to find cars to sell only to watch cars go by on the block and sell for more than i was planning on putting them out for retail.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Makes new cars look better and better.
     
    I’m starting to hope that an elderly relative would leave me a cream puff of an automobile in their will.

  • avatar
    Acd

    I didn’t realize how expensive cars had gotten until last week when it looked like my son’s 2001 Chrysler Concorde was making horrible noises and I started looking for a possible replacement.  There aren’t many $2000 cars and a few more $3000 cars but hardly any of them looked worth the money.  Then I searched for $5000-$6000 cars and most of them were older cars with 100,000+ miles and made the $3000 cars look good–if I only spent $3000 and the car died I’d be out half as much as when the $6000 car died. 

    The most interesting car I found during my online shopping trip was the 1996 Lincoln Town Car with 159,000 miles, white with grey leather and supposedly driven by an older lady to Bulldogs games, for $2500.  My son would have loved it.  As it turned out the Chrysler only needed new belts–apparently you need to change them at least every 10 years or 136,000 miles, whichever comes first. 

  • avatar
    Omnifan

    I had a 97 Buick LeSabre that I recently flipped for $3500.  Thought it was only worth 2000, but put it on Craigslist for 3500 and it had two interested parties in ten minutes.  Only needed one buyer, so gone.  The prices for used cars ARE insane.  At least mine only had 93,000 on the clock.

  • avatar
    Mathias

    I’m gonna have to differ on the “secretary” comment.  A friend of mine has a 2001 Celica.  No middle-aged woman weighing a buck ninety is going to enjoy getting in and out of that car.  I read an article some years back calling it “the best-handling front-driver” of its time.
    Now the model before that was pretty much useless, and it had the aforementioned, well-deserved reputation.

  • avatar
    baggins

    s I just sold a very nice condition 2002 Taurus with leather, ABS, side air bags and 24V V6 to a used car lot.  It had only 64K miles,one owner (me), clean body, clean carfax.

    Only issue was a very small valve gasket leak – 1 dime sized drop per day, and two dime ized door dings – no paint damage.

    He said auction value was 3300, but here in Northern Calif no one wants a Taurus and started me at 2500.  I got him to 3000 and called it a day.

    How much did I leave on the wholesale table?  ( I have no patience for selling low end cars myself, so that wasnt an option)

    • 0 avatar
      Steven Lang

      You should have considered it. That car would easily go for around $4000 cash retail. The fellow you sold it to will more than likely take it on a 24 to 30 month finance deal and yield about 7k by the time the finance company takes up the note.

      Loaded vehicles with low miles and leather seats always sell. It doesn’t matter what it is. It’s the base cars that usually have trouble gaining traction in the retail market.

      • 0 avatar
        baggins

        Meh, I actually feel better.  Its worth $1000 to me to avoid having to deal with the folks who buy cars at that end of spectrum.  I’m sure you meet plenty of nice, hard working people in your business, but I bet you meet some others you’d just as soon avoid. Same probably true of people buying used cars for 30K as well.

        Plus the time – I assign fairly high value to my leisure time.

        Last time I tried to sell a car in this price range via Craigslist, I got the most ridiculous requests in the first 15 minutes the Ad was up:

        -drive the car to a train station to show it
        – wait around literally all day Saturday, because the guy didnt know when he’d be there – he was driving in from nearly 100 miles away.

        I pulled the ad after about an hour and drove it to a used car lot the next week.  Guy did the paperwork while I had a sandwich across the street, and then drove me back to my office in my own car.   Worth it.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Is it fraud to bid on your own car up for bid? Can the auction company put ‘ringers’ in the field of bidders? I see the hammer drop only to have a staff member say something to autioneer, they hold the ‘sold’ car, stop the auction and ask the second highest bidder if he wants it at his bid. If not, they  re-auction it on the spot. Some cars leave the ‘block’ only to be run a second time shortly there after?

  • avatar

    Cars always seem expensive when you’re buying and cheap when you’re selling.

    Sold two recently, and in both cases felt I let them go for about $500 less than I should have. I’m pretty good at buying cars, but awful at selling them.

    • 0 avatar
      ringomon

      There’s a name for this psychological phenomenon.  It’s not that you’re better at buying than selling, it’s that the human brain thinks about it differently.

      Can’t remember where I read about it this (Gladwell?), but in a scientific study they gave a large group of random people a coffee mug.  They than asked them how much they would be willing to sell it back for.  The average was like $6.

      Then they took another group of people, and just offered to sell it to them, average offer?  $4.

      This effect gets worse when the object is something you’ve made yourself or put a lot of time into for obvious reasons.  Which the way some people baby their cars probably applies.

      • 0 avatar
        CapVandal

        In behavioral economics, the endowment effect (also known as divestiture aversion) is a hypothesis that people value a good or service more once their property right to it has been established. In other words, people place a higher value on objects they own than objects that they do not.

        Per wikipedia anyway.

  • avatar
    revjasper

    So when is tax time over?  I’d like to go out to buy a car when people aren’t thinking that 40% markups above KBB are okay…

  • avatar
    John Horner

    As a retail buyer I’ve noticed that late model used cars are not a very good deal these days. For example, a three year old Dodge Minivan with 50k miles seems to be retailing for around $16k. You can buy a brand new one for $22k. Say the useful life of that vehicle is 200k miles. A 50k mile used example has 25% of its life used up. It sells for about 25% less than a brand new one. Where is the savings? The last 150k miles in the life of a vehicle certainly is a more costly maintenance proposition than are the first 50k miles, so why would anyone who had a choice, buy used?
     

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      We got a letter recently asking to buy our 2007 Maxima.  They were offering us 13k for it right now, 15k if we financed with them and bought a more expensive Mazda 6 (Mazda dealer offer).  We looked around and found most Maximas around the 45-55k mark were still going for 20K in the region.  It’s crazy to think that a brand new Maxima is around 33K to start (barring random discounts).  So a 4 year old car that is still retailing for around 65% of it’s new value is shaky.  We looked at year old Legacies and found them going for practically new prices, shedding maybe 1-2K at most.  Essentially I could buy a new one if I got a good financing deal on it at that point.
      Essentially the pressure to move new cars have pressed the price of used cars up because fewer buyers can get into new ones and used ones are less plentiful as more people seek them out.  The US standards have excluded so many more reasonable priced models around 10k to start and I support the standards, I just have to say that with the new car price continuing the climb without any aid to finance the crushing price of used is just going to climb further and further.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        Think of the “housing bubble” that burst in 2006-7! Just imagine, used car prices will soar to insanely and unsustainable levels, then the bottom will drop out, a lot of folks will have extremely high car loans to pay off, people will just walk away from their cars, cars for sale will be rotting in the weeds and banks will need a second TARP to cover all the bad loans they made to those who couldn’t afford to pay for their cars, and won’t loan any money for any automobile, new or used. I could see this happening, but of course, not according to the scenario above.

    • 0 avatar
      FleetofWheel

      John’s way of comparing used vs new is concise and logical. Many used car buyers don’t understand this because they lack basic thinking skills.
       
      The cost of a used car should be, at most, proportional to the cost of a new car over an expected 200K lifespan.
      Then factor in a new car’s additional value in terms of latest safety design, near certainty of fitness and cleanliness, and a used car should sell for proportionally less than the new version.
      Even if the model run has remained unchanged for years, it really hasn’t, as all manufacturers make continuous small improvements in parts or assembly.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      so why would anyone who had a choice, buy used?

      Some people like a project.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      “John’s way of comparing used vs new is concise and logical. Many used car buyers don’t understand this because they lack basic thinking skills.”

      That about sums it up. I’ve seen people actually pay a premium for the last years of a car’s life, practically giving the first few years away to the original owner! 13% annual depreciation, assuming 12k miles per year, gives the original owner the first five years and 60k miles for half the cost of the vehicle. If I can’t get that depreciation rate on a desirable, clean, well-maintained vehicle from outside the rust belt, I’m buying new.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    It starts to abate in mid to late June although there is still a bit of a bump in prices due to the fourth of July weekend.

    Prices do come down at that point. But for the last few years supply has remained a chronic issue. There is still a stunning lack of vehicles out there that folks ‘want’ to buy.

    The car that cost $4,000 five years ago now will usually cost around $5,500. As for the cheap $500 car that I could always spot out a few years back…

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2007/12/in-praise-of-the-500-car/

    Buy-here pay-here dealers, exporters and strong dealers who are focused on specific ethnic groups have completely changed this business.

    The first ones yield higher proceeds from late model vehicles than most franchise dealers. The exporters place the blinged out SUV’s and popular brands out of reach. The final group will bid on anything cheap… whether or not it even moves.  

    The $1600 Town Car I bought last week would have been a ‘ho-hum’ back in 2007. Today it represents one of my best buys for the month. Why? Well read my last ‘Rent, Lease, Sell or Keep’ article. The difference between a retail cash out the door price and a ‘financed’ price is about double these days.

  • avatar

    What blows my mind is the used small truck market right now. I was looking for a sub-$3000 4 cylinder truck for a daily commuter/Home Depot runner. Seems like a few years ago these little Rangers and S10s were all over the place. I managed to get a 1998 Frontier with 148k miles for $2900 and that was far and away the best deal I found.

  • avatar
    Ubermensch

    So right now it looks like buying a new or low mileage CPO and keeping it at least 5 years is the best deal right now?  I have noticed that finance rates on new and CPO cars are very low, sometimes under 1%.  Someone looking to trade in a used car should be able to get a good value on the trade and then low financing on the new car.  It seems like trading in on a used car would probably not net as good of a deal right now as the used retail values are so inflated.

    Well, actually, as is usually the case, I have determined that the best deal is just keeping the car you have.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      I would disagree, it would appear the best deal is on new cars, not CPO used.  The entire point of this thread is how used car values are very high, approaching the cost of the same car as a new model.  If you shop around for the new cars that arent selling so well, work your best deal, you will come out ahead.

  • avatar
    hubcap

    Steve,

    Just wondering how prices at the higher end of the spectrum are fairing (two to three year old 50k+ when new)?

    I’m looking for a 2009 CTS V. It sounds like your saying it’s better to wait until fall to look in earnest.

    N’est-ca pas??

  • avatar
    MidLifeCelica

    “Everything from the controversial design to the sport touring nature of them is indicative of the Celica heritage.” Your lost me there…really? Maybe compared to a 2001 Caddy, I suppose. I’ve seen edgier bars of soap. What exactly is controversial about the Tc? Looks like any other auto appliance to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven Lang

      The last generation Celica was pretty much it’s own car.

      Most front-wheel drive Celicas have tended towards a more frumpish design from the mid-80’s onward. A few curves. Some nice fender flares (in the case of the 90-93 GT-S/All-Trac). But in general they tend to have limited curves with a bit of a bulbous front or rear to them.

  • avatar
    ExPatBrit

    The prices of small pickups has always been higher than expected.
    You are looking at $2000 for something that is legal and runs, it may not look great. $3000 and up for 4WD.
    The prices in NADA, Kelly Blue Book and Edmunds are typically way low compared to what the market says.
    I paid $3500 for my 99 Ranger 4WD  four years ago, they still sell for about the same amount now.
     
     

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      I agree that KBB, Edmunds, etc… values are way off.  I have been looking at AutoTrader to look at what comparable cars are listing for to help determine a fair trade in value.  Of course, I haven’t actually visited any dealers to find out if they would give my that value as I think many are probably just taking advantage of the low KBB values for extra profit.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Used small truck do go up in value if you buy at the right time.  Mexico opens up the import flood gates at a trucks 10th birthday and lasts till its 25th. Trucks also vanish from theft as those trucks need parts and can be driven across the border no questions asked.

  • avatar
    JMII

    I love this insider info. At the end of this year I’ll be trading my ’00 Passat and grabbing a used 350Z most likely. So if the used market is up then its a wash for me as I’m swapping one used ride for another. Given the direction of gas prices sports cars should be falling off everyone’s radar. And while the Passat takes premium it still manages 30 mpg thanks to the turbo + 5 speed combo. Of course when I go to sell I’m looking at $300-$500 hit for having the manual, especially in a four door vehicle. It does have a sunroof and decent paint going for it.
     
    Not sure about the Celica, as I never drove one myself, but had tons of friends that loved them. On the other hand I owned a ’89 Prelude Si back then and its still the best handling front drive I have ever experienced. The Scion Tc reminds me of the Toyota Paseo, anyone remember those?

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      I have a friend who just picked up a brand new 350Z, they are literally begging people to buy them, he made a crazy low ball offer and they took it.

      The Celica is a great car, but nearly impossible to find a good used one.  Every Celica I see has either been dogged out within an inch of death, or has 150k miles on it.  If you can find a cream puff thats been maintained, I would recommend it.  Excellent gas mileage and fun to drive, very stylish, a lot like the CRX Si, but with a back seat.

      • 0 avatar
        colin42

        350Z? Do you mean 370Z

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Yea, thats what I meant!  :)

        Its a complete base model, no options at all, but still very nice looking car.  I do not like paying for high margin options, so I thought he made a good move.

      • 0 avatar
        johnxyz

        Do you know how much your friend paid for his base model 370Z?  Percentage -off MSRP?  2010 or 2011?  Just curious – I have an interest in a new Z

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Its kind of hard to nail down an exact figure since he traded in a car as well.  I know they were stickered at $34k, invoice was $30k.  He ended up financing $21k and his tradein was an Altima worth around $10-11k.  They played around with the numbers and all, but by my estimates he got it right at invoice.  He had to play games, walked out, got the callback, etc.  Edmunds TMV for these are right around invoice as well, and there are dozens on the lots.  It was 2011, the only 2010’s left are loaded to the gills and priced too high IMO.  You should be able to work a deal…

  • avatar
    Disaster

    This is partly the fault of cash for clunkers which took a lot of good used vehicles off the road and to the crusher.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Always have to have one guy come up with the relationship to cash for clunkers!

      There are PLENTY of junky old pickups and rusting american iron for you out there.  The extremely small percentage of GOOD used cars that went to C4C havent made a big dent in the used car market today, its been discussed literally dozens of times here.

      • 0 avatar
        mopar4wd

        I would argue that it had some effect. Ecspecially on the lowest end of the spectrum up until 3 years ago I could buy $1000 beaters to last me a year on any street corner now I can find none. The local craigslist dosen’t seem to have any running cars under $2000 any more

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Thats a HUGE generalization, with no factual tie to C4C.

        Sure it had SOME effect, but only on a narrow sliver of vehicles.  There really wasnt a large group of cars that even qualified for the program.  Nothing too old, nothing that got decent gas mileage, and of course it had to have a real world value of less than $5k.  PLUS, whoever owned it had to have owned it for a year (or 2?) prior to trade-in, and also had to not only want to buy a new car, but also had to want a new car that had a big enough increase in fuel economy to qualify for the program, and ALSO be able to qualify for a new car, during one of the worst economic downturns ever.  The trade-in car didnt have to be running, which is where many of the “nice” cars ended up in the program… and there were a lot of older pickups traded in, since it was easier to meet the mileage increase requirements with the replacement car.

        So if you are in the market for a beater pickup, yeah, I would say there are less options now.  Or if you were mostly interested in beater american cars of the 70s and 80s and early 90s that got crappy gas mileage, same thing.  Or if you had a thing for wrecked or non-running cars, there are less of those to choose from too.  But since most of us even want our beaters to be decently fuel efficient, the problem you have with finding them is NOT due to C4C, its because the general economy is in the toilet and fewer people can afford a new car.

        And as far as beaters go, I dont know where you all shop for cars, but here in FL there are tons of them around.  Yea, the really NICE cheap cars are sorta hard to find, you need to be real quick on Craigslist, but for just a runner, you have your pick.  Even more if you dont mind doing some minor repairs like water pumps or whatever.

  • avatar
    djoelt1

    Seems to be lots of people here in the know on used car financing, that perhaps can confirm or contradict my recent experience trying to buy a used car.

    2007 Ford Freestyle.  60K miles.  Close to a stripper but with leather seats.  FWD.  3 in the middle row.  Ford dealer asking 15k.  They wanted me to finance, buy a $2000 warranty, get the $700 paint protection, and pay $700 for some sort of “value decline protection”.  I offered $14,000 cash.  They said no.  And they say that once per week when I call them to see if they have changed their minds.  I assume they are waiting for someone who can’t afford it to finance it, and get those high margin add-ons.  I’m guessing they can make $5000 more on a financed purchase than on a cash buyer, so they will wait.  Does this sound right?

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Three in the middle row is kinda rare but more common on Freestyles than on Taurus Xs.  Where the heck are you located?  I’ve seen a fair number of those on eBay and on Auto Trader with similar options and miles for closer to $10,000 – $12,000.  If they’ve still got it in the middle of June or in mid July call and make them your offer.  If they don’t take it then you know they’re just stubborn and stupid.

      • 0 avatar
        djoelt1

        Mostly looking in Craigslist.  I’m in Norcal, and of the 19 listed on Craigslist, 6 or 7 are the ad for the vehicle I am trying to buy, another 3 are for a vehicle that isn’t really for sale, and the remainder are AWD or 6 seaters.

      • 0 avatar
        Educator(of teachers)Dan

        Auto Trader – seriously.  Compare prices for a 500 mile radius from your zip.  You might be pleasantly shocked.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Stay the heck away from that dealer!  Talk about old school scam artists.  If you MUST shop dealers, I recommend Autoway, if you have any in the area.  They seem to be pretty fair overall.  But if you have access to a buying service through your credit union, those can be a great value.  I have USAA and thier buying service made my GTI purchase a dream.  I had a difficult trade-in situation, and spent 3 months shopping on my own with no luck getting a fair deal on both ends.  Literally 4 hours from the time I called USAA to the time I drove out with my new car, completely fair numbers across the board.

      • 0 avatar
        johnxyz

        Sorry – another question for mnm4ever – hasn’t it often been shown that you can get a better price on a new car on your own going through the internet sales manager rather then using a service, e.g., USAA, Costco, AAA, Amex, etc?  Did USAA help with the trade-in aspect of your purchase transaction?  BTW  USAA – great company. 

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        @johnxyz — I should have clarified… my situation was on a used car and with a very upside down trade-in.  I am pretty good with negotiating (OK, well my wife is better, but “we” are good), but it was proving extremely difficult to get a fair deal on the trade as well as the price of the used car.  We were looking for used GTIs, and they are rare around here.  The buying service at USAA pre-negotiated a price on the used GTI as well as a guaranteed trade-in price based on Blue Book value on thier web site, which was around $2-3k higher than the I was being offered elsewhere on a used GTI.  The new car dealers I was working with (Honda and Mazda) both offered that price right off the bat on a new car trade, but in the end I wanted the VW.

        But USAA pricing on new Mazdas and VWs was really good too, right there at the same price I already negotiated playing hardball, and MUCH easier since it is a guaranteed price.  I do not believe services like Costco are as worthwhile, and YMMV with anyone else.  USAA seems to be pretty darn good with anything they do.  The used pricing was good on my car, maybe not so good on others, but at least you know the real price before you even talk to a salesman.  Also, no BS pressure for add-ons at the finance table.

        For me, it was the combination of dealing with the trade AND the pricing.  For the above poster, he was obviously dealing with a crappy dealer and didnt seem to be so good at the negotiating skills, so my advice was to use the service and avoid the pressure and questioning “if I got a good deal”.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Paint protection and gap insurance on a car with 60k is insane.  I’d avoid that dealer, if you really want a Freestyle check Ebay and Craigs, you might have to do some traveling but it may be worth it if you can save a few grand.

    • 0 avatar
      tallnikita

      >>get the $700 paint protection

      everyone who wants to buy car should watch Fargo.  “true coat for $500”
      priceless.

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    I’m so glad I bought my ‘new’ car back in early Feb, it appears that prices are going berserk across the board. Even up here in Canuckland prices on some used vehicles are getting silly. Oh well, wait until things die down and credit becomes easier to get hold of an eventually we’ll see the heady days of $200 operational auction house clunkers again… or not.

  • avatar
    obbop

    Sold 1991 Previa. Spent wealth to bring it up to snuff.
    Sold to a young family from Iowa just starting out.
    I went as low as $300 but the nice young fellow said no… he felt the $500 was MORE than fair and appreciated my kindliness.
     
    Oh well.
     
    Just being a decent guy ™ that seems to be such a rarity within a society I generally despise.
     
    Done for “good Karma”?
     
    Not sure.
     
    Maybe just to be different.
     
    Stupid? Most probably think so.
     
    Maybe those folks are correct.
     
    I also keep off others’ lawns.
     
    And do not allow my noise to enter others’ abodes so they can dwell in peace.
     
    Hope the van performed well for the couple and their itty bitty spawn who drooled constantly, not having learned to spit yet.
     
    Still disgusted, in general, with the USA as a whole and its societal norms.
    Along with the vast majority of all that is human.
     
    let the 30-mile-wide asteroid impact at 15,000 miles per second.
     
    Humans are generally an unworthy species.
     
    Splat.
     
    Adios.


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