By on July 11, 2009

Webchatting on the FastLane blog, GM Reinventor-in-Chief Fritz Henderson wanted the world to know GM dealers don’t need no stinkin’ reinvention.

[Comment From Alfred ]

Mr. Henderson: what changes can we expect to see when we walk into a New GM dealer? What guarantees can you give us that customers won’t be mistreated and abused as before?

[Henderson]

I think our dealers do a fine job taking care of customers, and if you personally had a bad experience, you can let me know and I would ask that you look at another fine gm dealer. most research that we see indicate that gm dealers are by and large a real competitve advantage.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

56 Comments on “GM CEO Fritz Henderson: I’m OK, Our Dealers Are OK...”


  • avatar
    John Horner

    “I think our dealers do a fine job taking care of customers … ” said Mr. Corleone.

  • avatar
    ajla

    That’s nothing. On Ed Peper’s (head of the Chevy brand) June 9 webchat, this was his response to a question about improving the dealership experience:

    Question: “Has GM ever considered selling vehicles directly too the public? I have owned several GM products over the past 20 years and have never considered any other brand. My only problem with buying GM vehicles is the dealers. It seems that the dealers try to cheat you out of every dime they can get. Walk into a dealership without them knowing who you are and try too buy a vehicle, it is a nightmare. It seems as if its a game to the sales staff. Recently I was told by a salesmen, (Bob Hook Chevrolet) in Louisville, that I could always buy a Honda! What can GM do to make these dealers more buyer friendly? “

    Peper’s response:“Thanks for your loyalty to GM. I realize the biggest way to reinvent will be to make our buyer experience (both sales and service) more enjoyable. Our competitors don’t treat customers any better.”

  • avatar
    Robbie

    Given this attitude, it is completely inevitable that GM will be Obama’s Iraq.

  • avatar
    Accords

    Ya know…
    It was Iacocca who said…

    If you can find a better car then buy it.

    And I always say I did… and it wasn’t a Fiatsler.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Of course the dealers are doing a great job. They have the (internal, GM) dealer surveys that prove it! (Insert picture of dopey, Fritz facial expression here.) You know, the form they asked you to sign at delivery, with “excellent” already filled in to answer every question about your dealership experience. What a joke. Clueless.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    While there are surely some poor dealers out there, there are also a lot of very good ones, and that holds true for all brands and manufacturers.

    A lot of bad dealer experiences are brought upon the customers by themselves. Jumping out of your car, running out into the lot, ignoring a salesperson when they say hello, refusing to drive the vehicle to find out if you even like it, then demanding final out the door pricing to go shop it against the competition is a sure way to piss off and get poor service at any dealership, yet many people seem to think that is the best way to buy a car.

    It reminds me of when I sold electronics on commission, and customers would come in, have me demo a piece of equipment, explain why different models were better or worse than others, then run off and buy it online for less from some website that couldn’t afford to hire people who actually knew what they were talking about. I fully respect those who know what car they want, already have experience with it, and just want to get the best deal. Every dealership worth its salt has an internet sales department now, for you, just e-mail all of them, compare offers, and take the best one.

    For the customer who spends several hours with me, test driving numerous vehicles, going over pros and cons, working out the best solution to his or her transportation needs, it is insulting to have you take my knowledge and expertise and buy somewhere else because they are willing to undercut my price by a couple hundred bucks, just to beat the other dealer (not that it is a news flash, but pretty much any dealer will beat any other dealer’s price if you bring them an offer in writing). Therefore, don’t be surprised when I don’t offer you the lowest price when you tell me you are going to check other dealers. I’m not being rude, I’m not trying to screw you, I just don’t want the inevitable to happen – you using whatever I tell you to make it easier for someone else to sell you the car.

  • avatar
    Lokkii

    Song for Obama’s Government Motors

    Meet the new boss -Same as the old boss

    Change it had to come
    We knew it all along
    We were liberated from the fall that’s all
    But the world looks just the same
    And history ain’t changed
    ‘Cause the banners, they all flown in the last war

    I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
    Take a bow for the new revolution
    Smile and grin at the change all around me
    Pick up my guitar and play
    Just like yesterday
    And I’ll get on my knees and pray
    We don’t get fooled again
    Don’t get fooled again
    No, no!

  • avatar

    Our competitors don’t treat customers any better.

    Really? Because when we bought my wife’s Sonata, the experience at the Hyundai dealer was much, much better than I ever had at any Big 3 dealer.

    John

  • avatar
    zaitcev

    I like this in particular: “… demanding final out the door pricing to go shop it against the competition is a sure way to piss off and get poor service at any dealership”. I swear to God now that I will do nothing else in any dealership I set my foot in the future. If Scion made a truck, I’d buy that just to thumb the fine sales staff posting such incredibly offensive revelations.

  • avatar
    th009

    The lady doth protest too much, methinks.

    First, Henderson did not claim the GM dealers are perfect, only that many of them are good, and he would personally like to hear about the bad ones.

    Next, every brand has good and bad dealers. Brands like Lexus that have focused on dealer development tend to have more good ones, and their bad ones aren’t as bad, but there is still variation. And if you name any volume brand (>1000 cars sold in the US last year), in five minutes you’ll be able to find a litany of dealer complaints on Google. And pretty much all the brands are working on improving dealer quality.

    As for GM’s dealers, there are good ones and bad ones, but they are neither all bad nor all good. And the “good” dealers don’t have all “good” salespeople, nor do the “bad” dealers have all “bad” salespeople. But I will bet that the dealers that got terminated will have had, on average, worse customer satisfaction scores than the ones that remain, improving the average.

    And, yes, the customer sat surveys are the only realistic way to measure this. Yes, you can do some incognito visits, but it’s not feasible to do enough such visits (especially with the new frugal budgets) to make them statistically significant. Even if surveys aren’t useful as absolute indicators of quality, “bad” dealers will tend to get more “bad” surveys, pointing out dealers that need to improve.

    But dealer improvement is a continuous long-term effort — for any manufacturer, let alone one with 4,000 dealers in the US alone. To assume anything else is either hypocritical or naive.

  • avatar
    thebanana

    I can buy a Dell computer online, straight from the manufacturer. But I can’t do the same with a car or truck. That is what has to change.

  • avatar

    “I think our dealers do a fine job taking care of customers, and if you personally had a bad experience, you can let me know and I would ask that you look at another fine gm dealer.”

    Jeez, what a dork. Who’s writing his lines?

    The standard response is “you can let me know, and I will personally do everything to make things right.” Even if it’s a bald lie.

    As a car maker, you NEVER EVER recommend your customer to change his dealer. Suicide. The dealer represents the brand. “Change your dealer” translates to “if you don’t like it, eff off and get lost.”

    Is this the same guy who said the reinvented GM is all about the customer?

  • avatar
    ravenchris

    The hit and run mentality of most automobile dealership personnel has permanently crippled their reputations.

  • avatar
    ravenchris

    NulloModo:

    You reap what you sow.

  • avatar
    beken

    “I think our dealers do a fine job taking care of customers, and if you personally had a bad experience, you can let me know and I would ask that you look at another fine gm dealer.”

    Yes, I have personally had a bad experience. Like my engine catching fire less than 5 miles after I drove my car off the lot. Or my brakes seizing on me right after my GM dealer serviced my brakes. Or a wheel falling off after having recall work done on my car regarding faulty ABS linkages. No “fine GM dealer” is ever touching any of my cars again.

    I don’t think Mr. Henderson has a clue what is happening out there in the real world.

  • avatar
    revjasper

    At least we know what to write on the tombstone now.

    Rumor has it that you can have a good experience at a GM dealership, but I’ve never managed that. Anyone else?

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    At the Pontiac dealership, they dug out a base Vibe for me to test drive. When the glove box latch snapped off in my hand, they wanted to charge me for the repair.

  • avatar
    capdeblu

    The first new car I bought was a Chrysler. It overheated on the way home from the dealership. The radiator was underfilled. This was an omen.

    It turned out I was sold a wrecked program car as being new. The nightmare continued. Being young and poor there was nothing I could do. Lee I. was no help at all. My letters to him went unanswered.

  • avatar
    ThorS

    That is the worst kind of answer. It’s not only arrogant, it shows mr. Henderson is totally oblivious of what brought GM down. And – once again – it goes to show he’s not the right man to make this sinking ship floating again. Same s#!t, not even a different wrapping.

  • avatar
    turbosaab

    So when does the GM Death Watch II series begin?

  • avatar
    Geo. Levecque

    There really isn’t any change in GM,its the same old, same old once again, until these CEO’s and leaders learn to wear Sack cloth and have true contrition of how they have screwed the people of both our Countries over many years, they will continue there well worn logic for years to come if they exist at all!

  • avatar
    shaker

    Fritz’ “date” would do well to keep her left “paw” tightly where it is…

    It’s a good metaphor for the “old” GM customer experience – would the “new” GM please stand up?

  • avatar
    commando1

    “…if you personally had a bad experience, you can let me know…”

    Your cell phone number please, sir?

  • avatar
    Stu Sidoti

    I’m coming to this late, but I believe that GM needs to fix it’s dealership’s level of ‘service’ more so than anything else right now. I believe that their new products and future products will be quite competent and some may even be segment bests, but if no one wants to deal with your dealers and suffer a terrible ownership experience, you’re not even beginning to solve the main problem. If people like your cars, and the reviews are good and their even winning awards, people still are not going to buy your cars if they hate your local dealer…

    And Fritz, it ain’t like the old days of 90 days ago buddy…there AIN’T another dealer down the street anymore. In the small, affluent town my parents live in, you closed the only GM-Buick-Chevrolet-Cadillac dealer in town. If you think the local folks are going to drive 30 miles to be treated like crap by some other dealer, you got another thing coming Hoss…those folks will now by from the remaining Ford, Dodge, Honda and Toyota dealers.

    Fritz…I suggest you start doing what Tom LaSorda at Chrysler tried…and that was to force his mgt team to drive a three-year-old Chrysler for awhile and actually experience real world ownership…the other thing I suggest is that you find your nearest Penske Automotive Group owned dealer…a couple of my cars are bought from the Penske group and we get great dealership service and always have a pleasant visit. You watch Fritz, if Jim Press gets his way, Chrysler dealers will soon be out-serving their customers and they will win some sales from you because of it-people talk Fritz and people still bad-mouth their GM dealership experiences.

  • avatar
    Dynamic88

    I don’t think Mr. Henderson has a clue what is happening out there in the real world.

    One would think the downward slope of the market share graph would be a clue – but no.

  • avatar
    Joe ShpoilShport

    I’m incredulous. Most of all because I am paying for this crap. How can Obama talk about this with a straight face.

    What a joke. You and me? We’re the butt of it.

  • avatar
    Accords

    Stu Sidoti
    As much as I hate GM…

    The dealers brought the consolidation on themselves.

    Ya have to sell enough cars.
    Ya cant be within a distance from other GM dealers.
    Ya have to have a decent shop.

    In this case.. ONLY. Its nott GMs fault that they closed the that PBG shop.

    And if your parents live in a “affluent town”.. what they hell are they buying GM garbage for?

    Isnt a Lex or MB or BMW shop in the area?

    As for closing GM shops..
    Chapsler ones arent any better.

    And with those two down.. all ya got is Ford. Buying from the default isnt great, but its better than GM / Chrapsler.

    As far as 30miles go..
    Thats nothing.

  • avatar
    Srynerson

    Rumor has it that you can have a good experience at a GM dealership, but I’ve never managed that. Anyone else?

    Well, you see, the trick is that during the test drive you have to “accidentally” brush the salesman’s thigh when you reach for the parking brake and then, when you get to the end of the drive and the salesman asks if there’s anything else he can help you with, you casually mention that that you’d like to pay for “undercoating,” take out $100 from your wallet, put it on the dashboard and then…. Wait, why is everyone looking at me like that?

  • avatar
    Lee

    (insert photo of man with his head up his ass here)

  • avatar
    linkat8688

    Give the dealers a break….for those that know the management at GM wants control of the dealers! GM perpetuates the idea dealers are their downfall, but they have their heads so far up because of their own arrogance. Most dealers have kept their heads barely above water in this economic crisis…

    There are some great dealers out there….maybe it’s the attitudes of the customers (such as some on this site) that go in and create their own bad experience just to have something to complain about….I’m sure if some of you had let the dealer principal know there was an issue…it would have solved immediately.

    Why always the negative? The dealers support your local communities!

  • avatar

    # Robbie :
    July 11th, 2009 at 10:40 pm

    Given this attitude, it is completely inevitable that GM will be Obama’s Iraq.

    I really wish those on TTAC would give this stupid, nonsensical meme a rest.

    The surge in Iraq succeeded. Gen. David Petraeus’ counterinsurgency strategy worked. Of course only history will tell if the Iraq war will ultimately be a success but at this point it appears to be so. While it’s not pacific, Iraq is pretty stable. US forces just withdrew from the major cities and the Iraqi army and police forces continue to shoulder more and more of the security burden. A civil political society seems to be developing there. The Barzanis seem to be consolidating their family’s rule in the Kurdish region and their actions are troubling, but on the whole Iraq is better off than under Hussein’s Baath party.

    It’s not out of the question to say that the nascent growth of democratic society (there is more to a democratic society than just elections, btw) in Iraq is influencing Iranians next door to question their own authoritarian regime.

    FWIW, Obama’s already made enough foreign policy gaffes that you don’t need to recycle anti-Bushisms. Siding with the Honduran erstwhile leftist dictator while ignoring the consensus of Honduras’ Supreme Court, Legislature, military and even the former president’s own political party that he had grievously violated the Honduran constitution.

    Eventually the current economic recession will end because, after all, economies are indeed cyclical. I hope GM survives and then thrives, for the well being of my own community here in Michigan. However, I fear that the current administrations and Democratic Congress will screw the pooch on so many issues that any missteps in Iraq will look minor by comparison (except, of course, for the fact that in war human lives are lost).

  • avatar
    Dukeboy01

    I’ve bought new GM cars and new Honda cars. The service, courtesy, and over- all customer experience I received from Honda kicks GM’s ass. There is no comparison.

    I will go to a GM dealer one more time in my life to buy a car when I buy a Camaro sometime next year. I want a mid- life crisis car, a big boy toy that I plan to keep until long after I turn into Clint Eastwood’s character in “Gran Torino,” old, grumpy, half- racist, and armed to the teeth.

    That will be my last GM (and domestic) vehicle. It will be Hondas for me and mine for our daily drivers from then on.

  • avatar
    davejay

    And, yes, the customer sat surveys are the only realistic way to measure this.

    Mystery Shoppers might help.

  • avatar

    I think our dealers do a fine job taking care of customers, and if you personally had a bad experience, you can let me know and I would ask that you look at another fine gm dealer. most research that we see indicate that gm dealers are by and large a real competitve advantage.

    I’d give Fritz a B- on that answer. Remember, he can’t throw his dealers under the bus (well, at least the ones that are keeping their franchises).

    Better version:

    “While our internal benchmarks and independent quality surveys show that GM’s dealers give us a competitive advantage over other brands, we’re committed to continuously improving the consumer experience. As you probably have heard, GM is in the process of consolidating our dealer network and one of the most important criteria we are using is the level of customer service, and we believe that GM is going forward with the very best dealers. Today’s best, though, still has room for the continuous improvement I mentioned. Each and every person at the new GM is dedicated to giving consumers the best cars and the best service you can find.”

  • avatar

    Joe ShpoilShport

    Are you related to Ralph?

    Ralph Spoilsport Motors – Head in any direction on the freeway of your choice!

  • avatar
    NickR

    My most recent GM (Roy Foss in Toronto) dealer experience:

    I went to test drive a particular vehicle with a particular engine option. I had researched the vehicle and discussed both it and it’s competitors with the salesman at some length, and went for a test drive where I was open and honest about my experience with the car, my buying timelines, etc.

    I was polite, informed, and (briefly) a real ‘intender’.

    Then as I thanked the guy for his time, I mentioned that they happened to be giving away a free iPod shuffle, and could I please have one. The guys demeanor instantly changed. He all but refused to give me one, and basically accused me of coming in just to get an iPod shuffle. I told him that I’d hardly research their vehicle and its competitors and waste an hour of my time to get one. Basically, he just got ruder. Finally, I figured it was a choice of saying ‘F*** you’ or just leaving, and I opted for being polite.

    However, I did send an email to GM complaining (this guy was really rude). They called to apologize and said the dealer would also. Weeks go by…nothing. GM called again and asked if the dealer had called. When I said ‘no’ they said they would call them again. I told them not to bother, that I wasn’t interested in anything they had to say, and that whatever chance there was of me buying GM had vanished.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Ronnie Schreiber on what Fritz should have said: “While our internal benchmarks and independent quality surveys show that GM’s dealers give us a competitive advantage over other brands, … we believe that GM is going forward with the very best dealers…”

    C’mon. Do you seriously think anyone believes that?

    Do you think it’s only the Russian judge giving GM less than a 10.0?

    Fritz’ non-answer was basically a true answer; he either doesn’t want to know, doesn’t want to fix it, can’t fix it or has bigger fish to fry. Paint a happy face on it and get to the next depressing question.

    NickR,

    Do you suppose that salesguy is still there? I expect GM HQ really did call the dealer about it. Of course, if he is gone, they could have terminated the guy for any number of other reasons and pleasing HQ or NickR doesn’t figure into the equation at all.

  • avatar
    Joe ShpoilShport

    @ Ronnie Schreiber

    “… You won’t believe me when I tell you that I have here in my hand an envelope – that will clean your car on your way from work – to school. No, friends, not like the Australian self sharpening razors…”

    Something like that, anyway.

  • avatar
    Kevin Kluttz

    Doesn’t everyone know that a Vibe is really a Toyota? Someone must have broken the latch beforehand. Probably a Pontiac dealer mechanic.

    My only experience buying a new car at a GM dealer in 1982 was quite pleasant. Pete Hancock (rest his soul) gave me the most laid-back car-buying experience ever. And he even drove the car home that night (banks were closed) so that no one else could covet it. Oh, it was a white base Trans Am with 6000 miles on it being sold new as a “demonstrator”. Though the sales experience was quite pleasant, I have NEVER owned as big a piece of shit as that piece of shit. For two and a half years I was in and out of the shop (mostly out of warranty) for everything under the sun about every 2 weeks. It was always something. Finally, when the THM200C transmission wouldn’t shift into second until 3500 RPM and the redline is a mere 5000, and this is at 55,000 miles, I got the message. I have not been back to a GM dealer with any serious intentions since. I have browsed a few GM lots, however, driving up in my Toyotas, Nissans, or my current 2001 Accord, getting out to look around, then bursting into uncontrollable laughter. And I also don’t feel sorry for anyone on the lot WITH serious intentions. How could anyone be so ignorant as to even consider buying any GM POS?

    Thank you for letting me get that off my chest.

  • avatar

    C’mon. Do you seriously think anyone believes that?

    Some people won’t believe anything he says, still he has to put the best face he can on the company. I just think “I’m sorry you had a bad experience at a GM dealer and if you contact me I’ll help you find a good dealer” is a mediocre answer.

  • avatar

    How could anyone be so ignorant as to even consider buying any GM POS?

    How could anyone be so ignorant as to ignore a company’s current offerings because it made bad products almost three decades ago? Rational consumers should hopefully evaluate purchases based on the products’ quality and the manufacturers recent track record of reliability, resale value etc.

    Let me ask you, since 1982, have you been disappointed by another company’s product? Ever get bad customer service? You said as much when you said that the sales experience at that Pontiac dealer was the best you’d ever received? Do you hold that bad customer service against those Toyota and Honda dealers?

    My mother, an experienced sewer, was unhappy with a Singer she had in the 1970s. I’ve been looking at serger machines for my embroidery business. Should I ignore Singer’s models because my mom had a bad experience with that company? Sure, it can shade my opinion, but the decision should really be based on the company and product as it is today.

    GM may make some crappy product, but it’s generally acknowledged that they sell some cars and trucks that are at least competitive in their segments – Malibu, G8, Silverado, CTS. Any consumer shopping in those segments would do a disservice to himself by not cross-shopping those models.

  • avatar

    Fritz. Please note the dealer in Bedford hills NY who tried to sell me a SRX with flood damage is still open. They would not lease the car only sell it. When I took interior panels off and pointed out rust and clear river grit they denied it. Interesting how they would not sell the car to GMAC. In fairness a local VW Audi shop also had a water car on the showroom floor, an A6 wagon for a suspiciously low price. Two places Id avoid.

  • avatar
    Accords

    speedlaw:
    How did ya know the SRX and Audi had flood damage?? Did ya bring along a toolkit and crack the doors open?

  • avatar
    gzuckier

    Saturn’s whole point was for dealers to treat customers well. Maybe Fritz forgot that.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    Just went by my local Chev dealer, they actually have 3 SS Camaros on the lot. I took a look at the maroon one – 39k sticker, 52k market price. I know this behavior creates lots of controversy, but in my opinion it’s not a good long term type of thing to do.
    In search of a CGM bone stock V6, maybe I should just look for bigfoot instead.

  • avatar
    Lee

    whynotaztec :
    July 12th, 2009 at 9:25 pm

    Just went by my local Chev dealer, they actually have 3 SS Camaros on the lot. I took a look at the maroon one – 39k sticker, 52k market price. I know this behavior creates lots of controversy, but in my opinion it’s not a good long term type of thing to do.
    In search of a CGM bone stock V6, maybe I should just look for bigfoot instead.

    Now this is the kink of bullshit that really pisses me off. Only a fool would pay that. For $52k i’d rather look at an E Class coupe.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Ronnie Schreiber, “How could anyone be so ignorant as to ignore a company’s current offerings because it made bad products almost three decades ago?”

    It’s “brand loyalty” and, without it, GM would have gone straight down the tubes a long while ago.

    You know, Ronnie, some companies work very hard to cultivate brand loyalty in their customers so that, after three decades, they’re still buying that company’s products. Other companies don’t work so hard on customer retention and end up inadvertently creating brand loyalty’s evil twin, brand aversion, which used to keep Toyota at bay.

    Nowadays, GM is suffering because of brand loyalty and brand aversion and you’re all bent out of shape about it. Does that make sense?

    You know, there’s plenty of people out there who will not consider an Asian car. Just won’t. Give those ignorant folks a holler, will ya? They’re ignoring a company’s current competitive offerings, aren’t they?

  • avatar

    Accords :
    July 12th, 2009 at 7:51 pm

    speedlaw:
    How did ya know the SRX and Audi had flood damage?? Did ya bring along a toolkit and crack the doors open?

    Fair Question: The Audi was too clean inside. I took out the rear seat lighter and found it gritted up. I then popped off a few panels inside the trunk and there was a lot of fine grit in places that don’t normally get dirty.

    The SRX had huge rust blooms on the seat tracks. I went to the back of the truck and took apart some of the side panels. Again, inside found fine dark grit.

    I will usually take apart as much of the trunk area as I can when looking at a new car, because I want to see how much soundproofing is there, and the “non visible” build quality. No One details any more than the “spare area, if that.

  • avatar
    moedaman

    Ronnie Schreiber :
    July 12th, 2009 at 6:39 pm

    How could anyone be so ignorant as to even consider buying any GM POS?

    How could anyone be so ignorant as to ignore a company’s current offerings because it made bad products almost three decades ago? Rational consumers should hopefully evaluate purchases based on the products’ quality and the manufacturers recent track record of reliability, resale value etc.

    GM may make some crappy product, but it’s generally acknowledged that they sell some cars and trucks that are at least competitive in their segments – Malibu, G8, Silverado, CTS. Any consumer shopping in those segments would do a disservice to himself by not cross-shopping those models.

    Ronnie, while GM does make some competitive models, none of them are segment leaders. And you still have to deal with their service departments (at least with recalls). Why bother buying the 3rd or 4th or 5th best option when the better options aren’t that much more expensive? I’m a guy who lives with a car for a long time. I don’t need any extra hassles that can be avoided.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    “Are you related to Ralph?

    Ralph Spoilsport Motors – Head in any direction on the freeway of your choice!”

    I understand Ralph Spoilsport is doing land-office business selling Kamikaze Recalls these days. His new dealership is located at the Goyem Cutoff.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    On a more serous note and, since we’re already celebrating Anecdotal Evidence Day (as always), let me chime in. I’ve dealt with several Cadillac dealers over the past few years, for warranty and non-warranty service and sales. With one minor exception (they wouldn’t make the deal I wanted so the car sat for a few more months until they were offering it for less than I offered) my experiences have been good. The service departments at three different dealerships were fine. I was treated with respect, the pricing was fair, the work was properly done. In one case they took me as a walk-in late on a Friday and had me out the door in under an hour. The sales experience at the dealer where I bought my current car was exceptional (this is the same dealer who serviced my car on that Friday). I’d buy another car from this dealer without hesitation.

  • avatar
    nevets248

    The GM 100K powertrain warrranty-brought to you by the letters “NPF” (No Problem Found) and “CND” (Could Not Duplicate).

  • avatar
    Accords

    Lee :
    July 12th, 2009 at 9:56 pm

    whynotaztec :
    July 12th, 2009 at 9:25 pm

    Just went by my local Chev dealer, they actually have 3 SS Camaros on the lot. I took a look at the maroon one – 39k sticker, 52k market price. I know this behavior creates lots of controversy, but in my opinion it’s not a good long term type of thing to do.
    In search of a CGM bone stock V6, maybe I should just look for bigfoot instead.

    Now this is the kink of bullshit that really pisses me off. Only a fool would pay that. For $52k i’d rather look at an E Class coupe.

    Lee:
    How could ya look at a Camaro for $52g, some 15-20% in dealer markup and think about a E Class coupe for that money.

    The G8 in top performance trim.. is more equal to a 5 series.. than a Camaro for the money.

  • avatar
    Lee

    Accords :
    July 13th, 2009 at 9:27 pm

    Lee :
    July 12th, 2009 at 9:56 pm

    whynotaztec :
    July 12th, 2009 at 9:25 pm

    Just went by my local Chev dealer, they actually have 3 SS Camaros on the lot. I took a look at the maroon one – 39k sticker, 52k market price. I know this behavior creates lots of controversy, but in my opinion it’s not a good long term type of thing to do.
    In search of a CGM bone stock V6, maybe I should just look for bigfoot instead.

    Now this is the kink of bullshit that really pisses me off. Only a fool would pay that. For $52k i’d rather look at an E Class coupe.

    Lee:
    How could ya look at a Camaro for $52g, some 15-20% in dealer markup and think about a E Class coupe for that money.

    The G8 in top performance trim.. is more equal to a 5 series.. than a Camaro for the money.

    I am not sure what your point is.

    I wouldn’t even consider a Camaro for $52k. For $52k you’re in a whole new class of vehicle.

    The G8 GXP might be equal to BMW in performance, but it still has GM’s crappy interior (IMO) and crappy customer relations.

  • avatar
    Lee

    More good news for GM. The Camaro is going to be recalled.

  • avatar
    Accords

    Lee:

    Supposedly, if ya lookin at 39g for a Camaro.. and it hits 52g, I’d be comparing / lookin at a SL or SLK from MB, or a Z3 / M3 / coupe / sedan from BMW for that money and power.. not the CLK / E Class coupe. Power v weight v fun factor.

    And you are also right…
    The interior of a 40g car shouldn’t be that cheap.

    One reason why I just cant get into it. That and I equate the test drive experience of a GM vehicle with PORK.. = Against my religion. LOL.

    And last I heard…

    BMW customer service isnt so hot either.

    At least if ya walk into a GM store and drop 40g they look at you and treat ya like shit.

    If ya walk into a BMW shop, they just look at you as if ya aren’t good enough.

    So its a battle Stuck-up v Shit. LOL.

    Horrible.. but funny and TRUE.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Ryoku75: It might work in Europe, where theyre used to temperamental Volvos and what not. In the States I don’t...
  • Master Baiter: “You know, I think a lot of my controversial ire for electric vehicles stems from the fact that...
  • EBFlex: “ Need another example of environmental stupidity? Take the drought in the western US — particularly...
  • EBFlex: Still low quality, poorly engineered turds. Next
  • kcflyer: Meanwhile here in single party rule NY state they closed a clean nuclear plant and dozens of relatively...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber