By on March 4, 2008

ch008_073se.jpgChrysler's 14 percent February sales drop was, in and of itself, a staggering hit. But Automotive News [sub] reports that this decline occurred in the face of an aggressive campaign of profit-killing consumer incentives. In February, ChryCo "led" the market in incentives, kicking-up the deals by five percent to an average of $3,579 a vehicle. We're talking zero percent interest for 72 months on most remaining 2007 models and zero percent financing for 62 months on select 2008 models. Heading into March, the automaker is following the Churchillian advise: "When going through Hell, keep going." Chrysler is upping incentives by another five percent this month, and loading-up the special deals: a free Hemi upgrade for Ram buyers, a free tank of gasoline, a $500 rebate to U.S. military personnel (on top of any other incentives) and (ironically enough given the Plastech debacle) a $500 rebate to employees of companies that supply Chrysler components. Meanwhile, the automaker reported Chrysler Sebring sales soared by 92.5 percent in February, while Dodge Avenger sales rose 59.6 percent. Which makes us discount Chrysler's assertion that it cut back on rental fleet sales, and leaves us wondering: where would their numbers be without fleet sales?

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

6 Comments on “Chrysler Fire Sale Continues...”


  • avatar
    Orian

    They found a new rental car co to buy those Sebrings? Or they actually suckered a couple of people to buy them?

  • avatar
    Busbodger

    You know I’ve seen those Sebrings in traffic and I don’t udnerstand the backlask against them. They aren’t the ugliest cars on the roads. Yes they have a few details that I’d prefer to be done different but Chrysler is the only car maker of the big-3 that I think dares to be a little different. If you look at the other cars the big-3 sells they all look about the same – Jelly beans on wheels.

    The reason I wouldn’t buy a Chrysler (or not likely consider Fords or GMs) is the quality. We’ve got domestic cars and trucks throughout the family and they all have problems -sometimes serious- during their 150K miles. Meanwhile our VW and our Honda have been relatively trouble free (less than one new car payment in troubles for the life of the vehicle). I WANT to buy a compact (Astra, Corsa, Fiesta, Mazda 3, Zafira) next time but I’m not sure I want to sink that much money in a GM or Ford or Ford-cousin that might return serious issues later in our ownership. Yes I live in the USA but would prefer that GM sells Opels as Opels rather than as Saturns. Save the rebadging money guys!

  • avatar
    i6

    Chrysler is a manufacturer of fleet vehicles that thinks it can compete for private sales. The sooner they wake up to reality, the sooner they will put a small bluetec engine in a 300C and start making money again.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Gotta wonder what the real worth is of a Sebring or Aspen. With the above listed discounts and reasonably equipped, the Sebring is still North of $20k. Who would pay that?

    The Sebring may really be worth $15k fully loaded, as not many would pay much more than that for it.

    I just went to the Chrysler site, and was surprised to see the Crossfire still for sale.

  • avatar
    Geotpf

    Ford and GM both stopped giving away cars for basically free to car rental agencies.

    Chrysler hasn’t.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if the percentage of Avengers and Sebrings that went into rental fleets isn’t north of 50%. Hell, 60% or 70% (or even more) is fairly likely.

  • avatar
    L47_V8

    Geotpf :
    March 4th, 2008 at 1:15 pm

    Ford and GM both stopped giving away cars for basically free to car rental agencies.

    Chrysler hasn’t.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if the percentage of Avengers and Sebrings that went into rental fleets isn’t north of 50%. Hell, 60% or 70% (or even more) is fairly likely.

    I haven’t seen recent numbers, but a few months back I remember reading some percentages. The Avenger was in the high-70s, the Sebring in the high-60s, the Durango was in the mid-60s, the Caliber was mid-60s, and so on. It seemed like every Chrysler was on the list and they were all north of 50% fleet mix.

    The Pontiac G6 took the cake, however, as almost 80% (I think the exact number was 78%) went to fleets at that point. Ridiculous.

    How can you make cars that people car that little for? More importantly, how can you continually deny that there’s a problem?

    I’ve had people refuse Chrysler rentals before based on personal “quality” experiences from Chrysler.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • probert: “Though the most contentious decision was Biden’s cancellation of the Keystone XL’s cross-border...
  • probert: It has no impact on the current situation. There would be quite some time before any oil, if found, would be...
  • ToolGuy: Dear TTAC, If the 2023 Cadillac Escalade-V with 682 horsepower uses a 10-speed transmission, and a top fuel...
  • dal20402: It was the 2002 concept that had suicide doors. The 2015 concept was nearly identical to the production...
  • Jeff S: The late night comedians do miss those late night tweets of Trump as he is sitting on the can. Never was that...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber