By on October 11, 2006

06rabbit_24_hrgb.jpgRabbits are renowned for their reproductive skills. Clever ads for Volkswagen’s long anticipated A-platform hatch show city-dwelling Rabbits multiplying by the dozens. Ironically, the tiny population of US-bound Volkswabbits is hardly bound to satisfy demand, never mind dominate the landscape. A prospective buyer is lucky to sample Wolfsburg’s new bunny prior to placing an order, and then faces a wait of around 60 days. VW dealers couldn’t care less; nurturing understandably impatient leads is hardly worth the pennies of revenue it generates. So, with lukewarm fanfare, scarce availability and laughable profit, the Rabbit is back.

The ‘07 Rabbit exhibits a subtly evolved physique, sharing much of its architecture with the original iteration. Compared with its prominently creased Italdesigned forbearer, the new model’s lines melt into a soft, one-box shape with a slick .32 drag coefficient. Face on, the Mk 5’s headlights mimic Speed Racer’s concerned brow, while a body-colored smiley-face grill eliminates the muzzled look bestowed on A-platform siblings.

06rabbit_21_hrgb.jpgIn current Volks fashion, the belt dips way below the front fender and rises high above the rear wheel arch, accentuating the traditionally thick C-pillar (particularly on the two-door). Black bumper strips between the belt and the rocker help break up space, but with 15” wheels, the Rabbit’s profile looks more Cadbury bunny than black-tailed jack, and less rich than the previous Golf.

From the rear, the new Rabbit appears unpimped from the Mk 4, repeating the cartoon theme with Power Puff Girls’ eyes taillights. Details like twin exhaust tips and a hatch lift hidden in the Vee-Dub logo help redeem otherwise gawky styling. Taken as a whole, the Rabbit’s styling is comfortably familiar, and familiarly comfortable.

06rabbit_08_hrgb.jpgClearly, the Vee Dub’s interior accommodations account for much of the model’s massive worldwide appeal. Though the base model’s anthracite interior is as dry as a Steven Wright punch line, all the diminutive German’s papers are in order. From its modern motel styling, to the carefully considered placement of indestructible semi-hard plastics (which are not half as exciting as it sounds), to a rear compartment that accommodates full-sized sedan passengers in the style to which they’ve become accustomed, the Rabbit’s two box design is still the very model of a major model general.

This Wolfsburgian Rabbit feels a lot more solid than its hecho en Mexico predecessors. All the subconscious cues that you’re driving German quality have returned: doors thunk, switchgear snicks and switches respond without delay. The fact that the new Rabbit is bigger may also have a little something to do with it. In fact, the long delayed next gen Golf is a “Super Rabbit” of sorts: ten inches longer than the Mk 4 and 70% heavier than its Paleolithic namesake. The extra girth takes its inevitable toll on straight line performance.

06rabbit_23_hrgb.jpgRumor has it the 2.5-liter five cylinder engine hauling the heft is derived from Lambo’s Gallardo V-10. Be that as it may, in practice, the 150-horse long-stroke mill feels like Volvo’s unboosted five: adequate at the low end and short of breath up top, with an off-key exhaust groan that mimics Darth Vader’s Imperial fighter. Give the mill its marching orders and zero to sixty eventually rocks up after nine seconds. The fun factor is well short of Wolfsburg’s old, equally horsed 1.8 turbo four. But the jingle saved on regular gas buys a six pack of Natty, half a ham sub and a bag of pretzels per tank, come game night.

The Rabbit’s handling is, as always, its strong suit. The car’s electromagnetic steering system feeds back like Slash’s guitar, tracking straight over choppy pavement and adjusting the assistance according to speed. A new four-link independent rear suspension harness the Rabbit’s reflexes, helping you maintain hard-earned momentum while improving the overall ride quality. And when it’s time to shed what you worked so hard to achieve, the Rabbit’s four-wheel disc brakes are up to the challenge, assisted by a trick electronic brake pressure distribution system.

06rabbit_19_hrgb.jpgWith increased demand for versatile, fuel efficient vehicles, VW Rabbits should be hopping off car lots and crowding streets like the swift, promiscuous creatures they’re named after. There’s a lot to like about Volkswagen’s bread and butter hatchback– if only American consumers could get one to like. This year, VW’s bringing in around 19k cars for a 50k market (at the least). The ratio of supply to demand will certainly please owners lucky enough to secure their pet Rabbit, what with used examples commanding a relatively stiff price, but disappointed VW customers will be, well, disappointed.

Sadly, the German-built Rabbit has so little profit at American prices, it’s a wonder Vee-Dub even bothered bringing it here. Dealers and customers alike await the profitable, cheap-to-multiply replacement promised by VW brass within two years. Perhaps then the US Rabbit population will rise above that of an endangered species.

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61 Comments on “VW Rabbit Review...”


  • avatar
    jerry weber

    VW needs to reinvent intself as a quality small car builder. If this econobox exudes more quality than the japanese brands ie fit, versa yarus, etc, then VW has won back their old beetle unbreakable quality driveability image. If they make no money but put themselves in this position it may have a halo effect on their other products which do make money. They have never quite replaced the origional beetle with the public. This can finally burnish their image in the small car department. Just remember, none of the other econoboxs have any more power than rabbit and a lot less road feel. IT doesn’t quite get the gas millege of it’s Japanese siblings somewhere around 30, but it will be forgiven once people drive it. I call it a winner with more production to come.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Aren’t the non-GTI/GLI Rabbit & Jetta still built in Mexico?

    The difference between Rabbit’s list and invoice price is a mere $300, one of the smallest differences I’ve seen. Not much profit for the dealer, for sure, and little room for discounting short of more money out of VW’s pocket.

    Also, the 2 door costs $2000 less than the 4 door with hardly any other equipment differences. What are those rear doors made of, carbon fiber?

  • avatar
    1984

    IT doesn’t quite get the gas millege of it’s Japanese siblings

    “Japanese”? It does not get the mileage of any car it competes with by at least 4 MPG.

  • avatar
    tom

    Also, the 2 door costs $2000 less than the 4 door with hardly any other equipment differences. What are those rear doors made of, carbon fiber?

    You’re laughing, but I read that the VW engeneers somehow overdid the door-engineering, making it extremely delicate and therefore costly to install them. 2000 is probably still more than it actally costs though…

  • avatar
    Glenn

    Germans, over engineering something? Making it too delicate? I’ve never heard of either of those things happening before….

  • avatar

    Wouldn’t the Rabbit be more of a Civic-Corolla competitor?

  • avatar
    Brian E

    Aren’t the non-GTI/GLI Rabbit & Jetta still built in Mexico?

    Nope. The Rabbit and GTI are built in Wolfsburg. The Jetta and GLI are hecho in Mexico.

    I’m not sure this is any good news for quality, however. The electrical problems that the MkIV was prone to scream design problem to me. Maybe they’ve got it licked; maybe they haven’t. The MkV’s are very nice cars, that’s for sure.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Nope. The Rabbit and GTI are built in Wolfsburg. The Jetta and GLI are hecho in Mexico.

    Ah, thanks.

    Wouldn’t the Rabbit be more of a Civic-Corolla competitor?

    Yup. The $2k difference between the 2 and 4 door Rabbits is enough to vault the latter up to Mazda3 territory – just spent some time on the respective manufacturers’ US web sites, and MSRP’s are very close comparably equipped.

  • avatar
    mdanda

    The electrical problems so common on German cars scream “supplier problem” to me. The engineers probably aren’t aware of them. Or, more likely, don’t care, since Germans tend to replace their personal vehicles every few years anyway.

  • avatar
    gfen

    The old Jettas and Golfs were produced in Mexico, with the exception of the Wolfsburg Editions, which were from Germany. The same holds true for the New Beetles.

    The GTIs, on the other hand, came from either Germany or Brazil.

    I’m not sure where the GLIs were made. I’ll assume Mexico, though.

    I’ve read stories of overengineering on these guys, and I’ve also heard that due to the less than stellar sales figures on the new Jettas and Passats that they’re already planning on overhauling the visual designs for a Mk6 down the line. The Rabbit succedes where the Jetta and Passat fails because it loses that ugly chrome grill in favour of one that matches the paint.

    I’d like to see the base model Rabbits with TDIs in this country, because I think that would compete, and very well, with the Japanese hybrids. Unfortuantly, the TDI has been pulled until they recertify ’em to run on the new diesel. A two door TDI Rabbit, able to get 40-50mpg and costing somewhere around 20K…why buy electric? Even the hippies who flock to the Prius would jump ship so they could reuse fast food oil.

    I bought a new car last spring, and I tried to desperatly hold out for a new Rabbit. Didn’t happen. My old Jetta gave up about a week before they hit the showrooms, and I was able to luck out on a killer deal on an ’02 GTI. Oh well, when the loan is paid off, I’ll be looking for a Rabbit with a TDI and DSG.

  • avatar
    1984

    Any compact hatch, any company. Japanese or Domestic… the rabbit has the worst MPG.

  • avatar
    tom

    1984: If you have to post this twice, then at least give us some numbers.

  • avatar
    Walter Pabst

    It’s funny, from what I’ve seen, only $500 seperates 2 and 4 door GTI’s.

    As with the old Golf, the 4-door Rabbit comes with more standard equipment than the 2-door, and many more options are available.

  • avatar
    1984

    Tom,

    No repost, responding to Andy… and no… You have the internet just like me.

  • avatar
    Alex Rashev

    Wow.
    22/30mpg.
    A brand new Legacy Wagon (!!!) with all-wheel-drive and automatic transmission gets 23/30, all while having more interior space. And similarly equipped, costs only a couple grand over a loaded VW. Funny thing, Legacy only weighs 200lbs more than the Golf, being a pretty big AWD wagon and all. The last over-3000lb “compact’ car I’ve seen was a Probe LE V6, packed full of options, girls, and beer – and Golf doesn’t come with any of that to justify it’s mass.

    I think ze germans have a case of “Panzer VIII”-induced nostalgia. Building an astronomically heavy piece of machinery and calling it a Maus. Or a Rabbit.

  • avatar
    WhateverJustCrashIt

    The rabbitt is nothing but a laugh. I cant believe they even bothered. The rabbit is the answer to: “Where did the Golf go?” It didnt go anywhere, they just sell the Golf GTI and the new golf got renamed the rabbit.

    Why would I want to buy a car that is really something else renamed? Why would I want to buy a GTI when the new one will come out in Europe 2 years before I can buy it in the US? So I can see my rampant depreciation!?

    I love VW, but they need to get their house in order, and their product line in synch!

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    “6 pack of Natty” man I haven’t heard that in a long time. The best small car around to me seems to be the Mazda 3 in either trim. The new Civic isn’t bad but then it’s not cheap either.

  • avatar
    Johnny Canada

    VW North America is a strange operation.

    There is no R32 and the new 2006 GTI Mark 5 is only a 20 month model run.

    Strange.

  • avatar
    yournamehere

    a good friend was really interested in these. until we drove it. its slow and heavy (you feel every bit of it) and for the price you can get something that gets much better MPG and just as if not faster. he ended up getting an xB (i have an xB also so i was kinda bias) and he loves it!

  • avatar
    dolo54

    if an xB is faster than a rabbit then that is one dumb bunny.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Somehow, the rabbit does less for me than any car I can think of, even the Jetta.

    I did see a VW Phaeton on eBay yesterday with the W12 and under 20,000 miles for $36,000….

  • avatar
    der_rote_tornado

    The mkV GTI is a hell of a lot of fun and not too expensive. Mileage? I averaged 23 mpg during break in, and after that with lots of “jack rabbit” starts.

    I was surprised by how many squeaks and rattles it had emanating from the dash and sunroof. For a car that felt so solid, it had disappointing interior fit and finish, which I thought was a VW strong point. That seems to be a common complaint noted on the golfmkv.com forums and vwvortex. I’m waiting for an ’07 4 door. The mazdaspeed3 may be faster, but it’s styling is unattractive to me. The GTI was fast enough for me. I drove like a fiend and the cops have speed traps all over the county where I live.

  • avatar
    MW

    I guess I should drive one, but … it looks like another heavy, expensive no-fun luxury car from VW. Call me when VW starts making light, fun, tossable cars again. With 90 hp, crank windows and a cheap stereo, my 83 GTi put a smile on my face every time I drove it. I would buy that car again in a heartbeat. Today’s VWs are the equivalent of what Mercedes built in the 1970s — highly competent, well-engineered, and dull.

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    I am so confused. Is this car (2007 Rabbit) just a low-end Jetta/Golf designed to hit a price point with the Civic and the Corolla, or is it a smaller platform that is competting with the Fit/Yaris/Aveo?.

    If the new Passat is not selling, it probably has something to do with the upper $30K pricing.

  • avatar
    yournamehere

    the xB and the Rabbit are so close in straight line numbers its not worth comparing. the average driver cant extract the diff. plus the xB is much bigger inside and gets better mpg. plus i love the scion corp backed aftermarket support. they are really cool about. Scion has VIP lounges set up at car shows for scion owners. free food, big screen tvs, couches, piles of free stuff. they give away $1000s worth of parts. they really know how to do it.

  • avatar
    1984

    Problem with the xB is you have to like the toaster oven styling. The rabbit is easier to digest… for those who would rather blend in than stand out.

  • avatar
    yournamehere

    well to each there own. i love my xB. mine is a special edition and its BRIGHT green (google xb RS3.0) its a blast to drive and i love the attention it gets. The rabbit is a good looking car but weights waaaaay to much! lose some weight and it would be awesome. (also the xB starts at 14k and has 4drs)

    xB 5M: 2395lbs/105hp = 22.8
    Rabbit 2dr 5M: 2772lbs/150hp = 18.5
    Rabbit 4dr 5M: 2858lbs/150hp = 19.0

    Whats the Diff between Curb Weight and Gross Weight? I used Curb weight for this

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    I never quite understand the charm of VW Golf or Jetta, for those of you who have driven a Scion tC, Civic SI, WRX, Evo, or an Acura Integra, can you explain to me what kind of handling and power are we expecting from the rabbit?

  • avatar
    gfen

    Robert,

    The Rabbit _is_ the Golf. Same car, different name.

    There smaller vehicles, the Lupo and the Polo, haven’t made it to North America.

    I presume the Rabbit’s new price point and name is to try and win back people into the VAG family. A Rabbit to start your brand loyalty, and then you can move up through the ranks, or jump to Audi when you’re flush with cash.

    I haven’t driven a New Rabbit, but I’d like to take one out and see how it feels. As a non-informed driver, I find that there’s something about my old, woefully underpowered, Jetta, my wife’s NB, or my Mk4 GTI that makes it far more fun to drive than anything else I’ve been in.

    Maybe its in my head, but to me.. it counts. Fahrvegnugen, indeed.

  • avatar

    Jonny Lieberman:
    I did see a VW Phaeton on eBay yesterday with the W12 and under 20,000 miles for $36,000….

    So much???!

  • avatar

    Problem with the xB is you have to like the toaster oven styling. The rabbit is easier to digest… for those who would rather blend in than stand out.

    I think of it as the milk truck look, and I love it. If they had one that drove sporty, I’d find it extremely tempting.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    But think of that Phaeton W12 as a cut rate Bently Continental Flying Spur! under the skin, anyway.

    What did one auto journalist say about the xB at its intro? If you don’t get it, it’s not for you. And 50,000 have been sold in the US YTD.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    David — that car can go 200mph.

    $36,000 is cheap.

    Still debating…

  • avatar
    pfingst

    I always liked the Phaeton, too, even though the gas mileage rots (12/19, or so the always-optimistic EPA says). It’s big, heavy, and impractical. And goes really, REALLY fast!

    I guess I also like it because it’s a bit of an oddity. A $100,000 Volkswagen? That’s well into top-end Audi territory – wouldn’t a Phaeton buyer also be an A8 W12 buyer? At those rates, what’s another $15-20,000?

    And you have to love the depreciation! I saw a low-miles 2006 V8 Phaeton, with every option, on a dealer’s lot this summer for $38,000. According to Edmunds, that car was $76,000 brand-new! I just couldn’t justify the purchase to my wife (and oh, how I tried!). A W12 version for $36,000? I’d buy it anyway; you can always get a new wife, right? :-)

    I just bought a new car, so I’m off the market for the next few years, until my lease is up or my wife’s car craps out.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Again, to me the Phaeton was good for VW because it made people like me take interest.

    Whereas the new Rabbit brings back horrible memories from high school and college of breaking down… or in my friend’s GTI, the passenger seat breaking loose.

    The Phaeton, on the other hand, is engineered to run at 186mph in 121 degree weather with the AC blowing 71.6 degrees until it runs out of gas.

    My sort of car.

  • avatar
    Walter Pabst

    Why are we comparing the Rabbit to the xB? Nothing against the box, it’s just not in the same league. Which one would you rather be T-boned in?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    T-boned by what?

  • avatar
    pfingst

    It’s tough to call the Phaeton good for VW, since as good as it is, it really doesn’t fit with VW’s “team concept.” (Actually, you could make the argument that the high-$30K Passat doesn’t, either). Indeed, the glorious feat of engineering that is the Phaeton seems to be widely regarded as a very expensive failure. I’m with you, I loved it, practical or not, and it did make non-traditional VW buyers take note. If the object of the Phaeton was to garner attention, mission accomplished. I just think they were aiming for rather more. A $45,000 and a $65,000 Phaeton may have worked. A $60,000 and a $90,000 Phaeton (before options) is asking a lot. I still wanted one, though!

    The New Beetle was good for VW for exactly the reason you mentioned – whether you liked it or hated it, it made you pay attention to VW again. I never even liked the old Beetles that much, but the new one was a VW that was actually decent looking, unlike everything else they had at that time. And it has been a smashing success for VW, both in brand-awareness and sales.

    A parallel to the Phaeton can be seen in the Bangle-ized BMWs. They made people that wouldn’t ordinarily look at BMWs (like me) sit up and pay attention. Unfortunately for me, a great many people don’t like them.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    I guess… I just would like to have seen what would have been if Piech had stayed at the helm for another five-years.

    And again — did the Phaeton fail? Or did Volkswagen?

    Anyhow, Rabbit — yawn.

  • avatar
    Walter Pabst

    T-boned by a Waste Management truck with the forks halfway up.

    The Phaeton did not fail, Volkswagen did. Was it the departure of Piech that ended the policy of matching M-B car for car?

    Badge snobbery certainly hurts the Phaeton, and your average Rabbit/Jetta customer has no use for it. Likewise, those looking for a high end luxury sedan won’t set foot on a Rabbit/Jetta lot. Audi and Bentley dealers are much better equipped to handle these customers.

    There are still brand new ’05 Phaetons for sale in the US. Most people have no idea what the car is or who makes it.

    Like many intriguing ideas from Volkswagen, nobody follows up. What happened to the full line of “R” series cars?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    T-boned by a Waste Management truck?

    What’s the difference?

  • avatar
    Walter Pabst

    What’s the difference??
    That should have been my question to you. My point is, Volkswagen’s A-platform has a reputation for excellent safety, particularly in side impacts. In my opinion, this adds greatly to the car’s value.
    Am I missing something?

  • avatar
    pendragon6

    I test drove one at a dealer in Orange County. The interior was definitely a step down from the standard Golf/Jetta. And they added $1000 “dealer mark up.”

    I bought an Infiniti.

  • avatar
    larryj

    Here’s why I’m not trading my 6 year old Golf4 for a new rabbit – the rabbit holds less stuff, is heavier/bigger, and gets worse mileage with an engine .5 liters larger than mine. I’m not trading for a Passat wagon either. Too much $, middling mileage, ugly chrome. Now, if the rumored new Jetta whateverwagon shows up with the TDI bluetech whatever deisel 40+mpg engine BEFORE honda/toyota/whomever makes a small wagon with a hybrid or a hamster that can get 40+ (I dimly remember a Civic wagon…I can imagine a hybrid matrix…but I’d love a deisel DSG VW if you can hear me wolfsburg).

    Am I a demographic of one? I live in an urban area with tight parking and lots of lights (so even small SUVs are nauseating to drive around stop-start), I have a kid and all the associated stuff to carry around, I want high mileage because it’s entirely possible and probably a good idea you morons, and fun to drive is cool with me. The rabbit could have satisfied all of these things. But it doesn’t, does it?

  • avatar
    gfen

    From everything I’ve read and been told, the Mk5 has more capacity than the Mk4.

    The Rabbit forgoes the chrome front for a regular ole painted grill, and that extra .5L and cylinder raises your HP from 105 to 150, torque goes up too, but I can’t give you a number off the top of my head.

    Is the increase in power worth the change in mileage? That’s a subjective answer, but the lack of chrome and cargo space differences can’t be denied.

    Then don’t mind me, I’m evidently the VW apologist here.

  • avatar
    larryj

    gfen-

    edmunds: luggage capacity on the rabbit 15 cubes. on the golf4 it’s 18 I believe. More passenger room in the rabbit perhaps but not where I need it behind the seats.

    increase in power basically offset by weight, so not excited about 150 horses there.

    I love my golf despite the glove compartment door cracking and dangling, the recalls on the hazard signal, emissions thingy and BOTH front windows falling off the tracks. Seriously. I shouldn’t want another VW but I do.

  • avatar
    cretinx

    A turbo diesel rabbit would be sweet

    50 mpg or more, about a billion pounds of torque throughout the RPM band, fairly low price – you’d sell it to a lot of trust fund kid’s parents.

  • avatar
    camp6ell

    is this “the truth” about cars if this article is written by a vw salesman? heck, why not get rabid rick to write your next gm deathewatch for some more “truth?”

  • avatar

    I would gladly publish a GM Deathwatch by Mr. Wagoner. Think of the publicity! Seriously, Mr. Pabst is writing under a pseudonym, so he is "free" to call it like he sees it. You could argue that a VW salesman is inherently incapable of objectivity, but then I would remind you that objectivity is impossible. I believe the truth exists independently of our opinion of it. All those who seek the truth must be as open-minded, passionate, honest and informed as possible. I have no reason to believe that Mr. Pabst fails in any of these areas. In fact, Mr. P's status as a pistonhead VW salesman gives him a better perspective on their products than most. Oh, and rest assured I look an eye on all of the guys (and Lesley too). In many cases, I test drive cars that they've reviewed.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Replying to What’s the difference??
    That should have been my question to you. My point is, Volkswagen’s A-platform has a reputation for excellent safety, particularly in side impacts. In my opinion, this adds greatly to the car’s value.
    Am I missing something?

    Yes, you missed the existance of Subaru Impreza.

    Compared to the Rabbit, the Impreza is safer, more reliable, better handling and roomier.

  • avatar
    Walter Pabst

    is this “the truth” about cars if this article is written by a vw salesman? heck, why not get rabid rick to write your next gm deathewatch for some more “truth?”

    camp6ell, you are so perceptive. Does my story reek of cheap cologne or what? I was a huge fan and owner of VW’s long before I sold ’em, so it’s true I want the best for VW. Also, as a salesman, I am well aware of any shortcomings the cars have. Mr. Farago is kind to let me vent.

    wsn, you are right, I completely forgot about the Impreza 2.5. I thought the WRX package was the only justification for buying a car so ugly.

  • avatar
    camp6ell

    the biggest shortcoming of the rabbit from your article is that it’s not going to make you or your master any money…

  • avatar
    Walter Pabst

    camp6ell – Fair enough. Car companies build and advertise cars to sell them and make money. When they build, adverstise, and ship cars halfway around the world and don’t make any money, clearly a mistake has been made. My article does reflect my perspective, but it is all true. Why is that unfair to point out?

  • avatar
    dgcamero

    Sadly, the reason I would purchase this over any other small car is that I fit properly in it — I’m 6’5″ tall. I’ve tried other small cars — I outgrew my ’97 Civic when I turned 18, no big loss since it was a lemon anyway, and with Honda’s good resale I didn’t lose much money. Next, I had a ’96 Jetta that I drove the holy hell out of for a few years, but it was tired with nearly 200K miles on it and I didn’t want to spend money on an old (but very reliable) car to replace the timing belt and clutch (it was still on the original) that would need to come shortly. Next was my beloved ’98 Intrepid ES. It was fantastic, but was totalled by a dumptruck. In the month following the accident, I had an ’06 Charger and an ’06 Accord as rentals — Would have kept the Charger if it hadn’t been a 2.7 liter (excellent car, but almost as underpowered as the Scion Xb I test drove) but was really considering purchasing an Accord, so I asked the rental company to get me an Accord. I liked it but it didn’t have enough front seat room for me. It also rattled as bad as my ’96 Jetta with 200k miles (so much that I named the Accord ‘Rattles’), had darty (and therefore fatiguing) highway steering, and I felt the interior had too much hard plastic (way more than my Intrepid or the Charger, tho it ‘looked’ nicer than Dodge plastic). I tried Civics, Scions, Hyundais, Mazda 3 (best of that bunch by far) and they were all decent cars, but tall people unfortunately don’t fit properly in the Asian cars. The only one I did fit in was the Scion Xb, which was nice, but had the most gutless engine ever, had an unergonomic speedometer, rode harshly and *DOESN’T HAVE SIDE AIRBAGS — AT ALL!* Needless to say, if I’d wanted the car payment, I would have bought a Tdi DSG Jetta, but I didn’t so I got something that ended up being free, a *blech weep* Sable from a member of the family. At least I fit, and its reliable.

  • avatar
    r129

    I find it interesting that so much emphasis is placed on the fact that the Rabbit will be next to impossible to obtain. Maybe the market where I live is completely different from the rest of the country, but there were at least 5 Rabbits available at the VW dealer I recently visited. Compare that to the Honda dealer, where I was told by a salesman that people were waiting 4 to 6 months for a Fit, and not a single person got the color or model they wanted. And while I was at the local autoplex, there was a very angry couple complaining that they were told they’d have their Toyota Yaris in 2 weeks, but they’d been waiting over 2 months. Not that I’d personally consider a Yaris… yuck!

  • avatar
    intelbunny

    <a rel="nofollow"href="http://rabbitownersclub.com" title="VW Rabbit" is a rabbit owner's site that has some cool secrets about the vw rabbit.

  • avatar
    correy

    That Volkswabbit as they called is still a volkswagen.. Though some may find it uneasy when it comes to delivery of satisfaction for whatever the customer would like that would fit their personality. Just like may friend, when he made a purchased a Volkswagen Air Filter in the market. It took him two weeks before he got the merchandise. Some has really difficulties for them to find a solution.

  • avatar
    LamborghiniZ

    “But the jingle saved on regular gas buys a six pack of Natty”

    Hahaha good one

  • avatar
    zerofoo

    Hopefully VW can lure in a new young set of lifetime buyers with this car. They sure lost me as a lifetime customer with my 2000 VW 1.8t Golf.

    I actually went to test drive a Passat 3.6 4 Motion recently. I figured it was time to get rid of my Golf that I bought in college now that I have a kid and more money.

    I asked the salesperson if VW fixed their reliability/supplier problems. When he asked “what reliability problems?” I just shook my head and walked out.

    Does VW still not get that trips to the dealer every 3 months for a check engine light during the first 2 years of a car’s life is not normal?

  • avatar
    5150

    We’ve officially owned our ’07 Rabbit for THREE months. It has been in the dealership’s shop for almost 24 cumulative days for an ongoing and unsolved electrical issue (a draw SOMEWHERE). We are on our fourth breakdown with this car. The previous stay in the shop was nearly three weeks long, with the service department claiming they resolved the problem. We’ll be having it towed or jump-started once again to get it over there.

    Note that we’ve gone back and forth with the dealership and VW of America over the amount of lost time and unsatisfactory service. No one cares. The apologize plenty but do nothing to compensate you for the headaches other than offer a free oil change. I would much rather have a NEW car that doesn’t break down every 2-3 weeks.

    We anticipate the dealership will exceed 30 days worth of shop repairs, which at that time we will invoke our rights to the Lemon Law in California. Because of the poor quality standards built into this car by VW and its uncaring company standards, we will seek a full refund and shop for a different make and model altogether.

    The electrical problem in question is NOT a fluke. We stood in line at the service center while another new Rabbit owner complained of the exact same issue we are having. The brake caliper issue was one that warily kept us from buying an ’06. This is what I get for believing the hype and committing.

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