Rare Rides Icons: In Memoriam, The Chrysler LX Platform (Part IV)

The Chrysler 300 was the first production car to use the LX platform and was arguably the most important as well. We discussed the debut and styling of the exciting new 300 in our last LX platform installment. When it debuted in 2005 with retro-inspired muscle car styling and a good deal of Mercedes-Benz componentry, it garnered an immediate and positive impression from the buying public with its looks. But did it fare as well on its interior? Let’s find out.

Read more
Rare Rides Icons: In Memoriam, The Chrysler LX Platform (Part III)

Thus far in our Chrysler LX platform coverage, we’ve discussed two designs that never made it past the working concept stage. The first of those was the Airflite, a Crossfire-styled hardtop hatchback, while the second was the larger Nassau which was also a hardtop hatchback. Neither of them had pillars, and both focused on the future of car design. 


Journalists made incorrect predictions at the debut of both concepts and stated that the Airflite (in 2003) previewed the upcoming 300’s styling, while the Nassau (in 2007) was a sneak peek at a new styling direction for the 2008-ish revamp of the then-current 300. While those assumptions were wrong, a never-debuted Nassau design from 2000 was the actual genesis of the 300’s styling. And it appeared on the new LX platform in 2005. 

Read more
Rare Rides Icons: In Memoriam, The Chrysler LX Platform (Part II)

As the Chrysler LX platform heads toward its demise after the 2023 model year, Rare Rides Icons is making its way through the various large-ish vehicles that used the platform these past two decades. The starting point for this series are the original LX concepts that never made production. We covered the Airflite (basically a Crossfire hardtop hatchback) last week. And today we’ll take a look at the larger, more luxurious, and more obscure Nassau concept (of which there were two).

Read more
Rare Rides Icons: In Memoriam, The Chrysler LX Platform (Part I)


Big change is in the air at Chrysler and company these days, as the rear-drive LX platform heads off into the sunset. With a longevity of two decades - far beyond the reach of the majority of current platforms - it seems fitting to eulogize the LX at this juncture. The end of the LX represents more than just the end of the rear-drive internal combustion vehicle at Chrysler.


It’s also the end of two gasoline-powered Dodge muscle cars, the Charger and Challenger (only the Charger returns as an EV). The LX is also the basis of the last two remaining full-size American sedans: Charger and 300C. In 2023 all the last LX-based vehicles will roll off the line, wearing their various gaudy special edition gingerbread. Before that time comes, we should consider all the cars that brought us to this point.

Read more
  • Brn Cadillac XLR.
  • MaintenanceCosts Sample size is limited, but the worst I've sampled recently is the second-generation iDrive system in my 2011 335i. It manages to be both feature-limited and cumbersome to use at the same time. Although I appreciate the ability to program hard buttons to call my wife and son with one touch.Best is Sync3 in my former 2016 Ford. Clear, easy to use, full-featured, and very responsive.
  • Inside Looking Out Germans behave as if the Ford Touch never existed. Ford solved this problem long time ago. And you need faster processor, you cannot do it OTA.
  • El scotto The word-of-mouth price: 10 100-dollar bills and a used meth lab. Oh, and show me how to use the lab.
  • Dave Holzman My '08 Civic with 5 on the floor, and Michelin Pilot Ultra Sports, or whatever they're called, which noticeably add to the already good handling. But what makes this car the right car for the trip is the back roads between suburban Boston and Niskayuna NY--outside of Albany. Rt. 2, from the Connecticut River to Troy, NY (just short of Niskayuna) goes from being a gently winding two lane road to climbing the Berkshires, where the Civic excels with its tight handling, and relatively high power to weight ratio as it tips the scale at slightly more than 2,600 lbs. (For reasons I haven't yet figured out, the climb is even more fun going west to east.) Going east to west, once down from the Berkshires 2 does a lot of gentle winding on the way to Troy. There are other, more interesting backroads to get from Williamstown to Albany... and there are a lot of fun backroads between the Connecticut River and Rt. 7.