Is Ford Going the Pushrod Route With Its New V8?

Ford’s upcoming heavy duty gasoline truck engine, codenamed “7X,” was believed to be a 7.0-liter V8 built with the express purpose of replacing the 6.8-liter Triton V10 and perhaps the 6.2-liter Boss V8.

While the program will indeed bear fruit at Ford’s Windsor Engine Plant next year, there’s a new report claiming the mill’s layout should stir memories of famous engines of yore. We’re talking a large displacement (7.3 liters), iron block, and pushrod valve actuation.

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Union Boss Worried the Grim Reaper is Coming for Ford's V10

It was heady days at Ford’s Windsor Engine Plant in the late 1990s and early 2000s. The facility cranked out Triton V8 engines and the mighty 6.8-liter V10 for an insatiable truck and SUV market (remember the Excursion?), but its future is now in jeopardy.

Aggressive fuel economy targets and the move towards EcoBoost power and fewer cylinders in Ford engine bays have workers and their labor leaders wondering how long they can continue building the factory’s chief powerplant — the Triton V10.

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  • MaintenanceCosts Uh-oh. This is the same mistake Lexus made with the LS 500. People like their large luxosedans stately, not sleek, and you can't make up the difference by making them bigger.
  • FreedMike In the words of my old copyediting prof: "Accuracy! Accuracy! Accuracy!"
  • Eric Here’s a couple of pics.
  • Eric The shock towers have the typical rust, the body is very straight surprisingly , little surface rust at the bottom of the quarter panels but not too bad. The interior isn’t as bad as it looks, I’ll throw on a dash cover and I think it will clean up nicely. I’ve owned an MN12 for almost 20 years now, this is my first fox platform, it’ll be a great restoration project!
  • EBFlex So all the reasons that were present and caused Ford to substantially raise prices less then a year ago are no longer present? What changed? Does it still cost Ford $25K more to make a fake Mustang than it does a comparable Edge? “The Michigan-based company cites “significant material cost increases,”  supply chain issues and changing demand for the new higher prices. ”So those issues are solved?