Opinion: Automakers Are Overstepping Their Boundaries

General Motors now requires salaried employees operating in the United States to disclose their coronavirus vaccination status. As confirmed by the automaker on Thursday, the decision is supposed to help the company determine what percentage of its own workforce is vaccinated so it can make better decisions about which safety protocols to implement. But your author is under the assumption that “as many as possible” will always be the preferred answer.

Earlier in the month, GM forced all salaried employees to disclose whether or not they were immunized for COVID-19 using the automaker’s internal network. Those answering to the affirmative were required to submit proof of vaccination by last Monday. But it sounds as though the manufacturer is just getting warmed up for more invasive activities.

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Ford Postpones On-Site Work Until 2022, Considers Vaccine Mandates

On Wednesday, Ford Motor Co. told employees that it would delay plans for on-site work due to coronavirus concerns relating to the delta variant. Non-site-dependent staff are being told they stay home for the rest of 2021, while line workers will still be required to come in so long as there’s a job to be done — creating a dichotomy between white and blue-collar workers.

While Ford has encouraged some teams to come back to the office for various projects, it has repeatedly delayed its return-to-work timeline. Workers now being told to stay home until 2022 were previously informed they’d be coming back to the office in October. Before that, everyone thought it would be business as usual by the summer. Now the company is adopting a policy that has most people staying home even after 2022 as often as possible while it considers mandating vaccines.

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  • SCE to AUX I doubt Ford's EVs were profitable even at the former prices, which is why one outlet called Tesla's profitability a 'weapon'. This means Ford will rely even more heavily on its trucks to pay for its EV program.As for Ford's ability to uncork its supply chain - I'll believe that when I see it.
  • Nick Naylor Considering this as a replacement for our 13' Quest. Looking for legitimate post-3rd row trunkspace, decent fuel economy, GVWR of 6k+ lbs (for tax purposes)
  • FreedMike Looks good, but am I the only who thinks that Audi won't be well served with a front end design that looks an awful lot like a Ford Fusion's?
  • FreedMike "Ford is citing new supply chains as the reason it can now crank up production of the Mach-E."Anecdotally, here in Denver, the railhead where new cars are dropped off for distribution to dealers is northeast of the city, on I-76. I pass by it most mornings on my way to work. For most of 2021 and 2022, the lot was depressingly sparse; it now appears to be quite full on most days. That's pretty remarkable for this time of year, which isn't traditionally a good month for auto sales.Evidence of a) better supply, b) lower demand, or a combination?
  • MaintenanceCosts Watching the OEMs try to navigate this new market is like a Keystone Kops show.And it's not going to get any more stable any time soon, with the wild race to try to secure battery production capacity and the coming economic potholes (especially in China).