2017 Audi A4 2.0T Quattro Review – Nothing To Do But Pick Nits

It’s the new version of an always desirable German luxury sports sedan.

Shocker: it’s good.

Though the 2017 Audi A4 looks like a carbon copy of the 2016 model, it’s a new car with a new platform, new dimensions, new interior, and a revamped powertrain.

The A4’s turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder is more powerful than before. Horsepower is up from 220 to 252. Torque jumps by 15 pounds-feet to 273, and it all comes on strong at 1,600 rpm. The new car is about an inch longer than before and nearly an inch wider. U.S. pricing for Quattro models begins at $40,350. Equipped similarly to our Audi Canada-supplied model ($60,285 in heavily optioned Technik trim north of the border), the 2017 Audi A4 Quattro Prestige would be $54,025, a 33-percent leap beyond the basic A4 Quattro’s price.

Yup, it’s good. At $54,025 it oughta be. Audi will tell you it how good it is. So too will your Audi dealer’s sales consultant. In fact, potential Audi A4 buyer that you are, you are able to tell yourself how good the 2017 A4 is.

I can join in the fun. But as TTAC’s own Bark. M explained yesterday, that’s easy.

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  • Cprescott Yawn. The dinoaur death rattle.
  • Cprescott I'm sorry. There should be zero subsidies for whatever vehicle you want to buy. The automakers are lucky that even this stupid law exists.
  • Cprescott Just what we needed - another one in that segment.
  • MaintenanceCosts They're probably paid a bit more than they're worth, because relationships among boards are a bit incestuous, and the CEO always gets the benefit of the doubt among buddies. But there's no question they can add enough value to justify very high pay.The real problem is that they're not taxed enough. A mere high wage earner can have an effective federal tax rate of over 30% under some circumstances. These guys usually pay more like 10% to 15%, because they are able to structure their finances so that much income is deferred and much of the rest is capital gains. The rules around timing should be stricter, the capital gains rate higher, and they should pay the same effective tax rates as their second- and third-level reports.
  • Cprescott No. Whatever the company wants to pay for Executive help is up to them and their stockholders. Since they are the only ones who live this job 24/7/365, they should be well compensated. I've been a GM for decades and that is my responsibility for the same period; I cannot imagine trying to run an entire company with all of the potential snafus that arise.