Ford Boss Jim Farley Claims That EV Manufacturing Will Require 40 Percent Less Labor

Tim Healey
by Tim Healey
ford boss jim farley claims that ev manufacturing will require 40 percent less labor

Ford CEO Jim Farley warned last week of "storm clouds" for auto workers as the eventual transition to electric vehicles will require fewer workers -- 40 percent fewer, according to Farley.


Farley also said Ford needs to make more parts in-house, presumably to help reduce job losses.

From the Financial Times (sub required): “It takes 40 per cent less labour to make an electric car, so . . . we have to insource, so that everyone has a role in this growth,” Farley said at a conference in Detroit focused on improving racial diversity in the auto industry. “We have a whole new supply chain to roll out, in batteries and motors and electronics, and diversity has to play an even greater role in that,” Farley told civil rights activist Jesse Jackson, whose Rainbow Push Coalition sponsored the conference.

Ford is aiming to have 50 percent of its global sales be EVs by 2030.

It's widely expected that the production of EVs will require fewer workers because EVs require fewer parts. In 2018, the United Auto Workers union estimated that it will lose 35,000 jobs -- the union represents about 400,000 workers.

A report out of Germany suggests that the country could lose 400,000 jobs over the next decade during a shift to EV production.

Farley also said earlier this year that the company's workforce is a bit too bloated. Three thousand full-time and contract employees were cut in August. Ford employed 183,000 people at the end of 2021.

Ford, like other OEMs, is partnering with suppliers for battery production. Farley pointed out that the company is undergoing a shift it hasn't seen in six decades.

“If Henry Ford came back to life he would have thought the last 60 years weren’t that exciting, but he would love it right now because we’re totally reinventing the company,” Farley said, according to the Financial Times.

[Image: Ford]

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  • CaddyDaddy CaddyDaddy 6 days ago

    Less assembly workers, sure. However, how many children in open pit mines in the Congo to mine the necessary minerals?

    • See 3 previous
    • Matt Posky Matt Posky 6 days ago

      No cobalt is great news. Now we only have to worry about the horrors of nickel and lithium mining, generalized raw material shortages, automakers using EVs as an excuse to layoff tons of people, and the fact that battery production is localized primarily in Asia.


  • CaddyDaddy CaddyDaddy 6 days ago

    "cobalt is used to refine oil into gasoline" source??

    • See 1 previous
    • Lou_BC Lou_BC 5 days ago

      "Cobalt is used as a catalyst in refining operations. It helps remove sulfur (and maybe other impurities) from the hydrocarbon stream. In theory no cobalt is consumed in the reaction, but in practice some will be lost to erosion and flaws in the recycling process.

      It takes about 1 pound of cobalt to remove the sulfur from 80,000 gallons of petroleum products, like gasoline. 80,000 gallons would power a car for about 2.4 million miles, but 98.8% of that cobalt is recoverable, meaning we permanently lose only a pound of cobalt for every 6.6 million gallons we refine."

  • Da Coyote Caddy Daddy wins.
  • MaintenanceCosts I'm over here drooling, but I'm about to spend exactly this much on interior furnishings, and I really need four seats in a toy car.
  • CaddyDaddy The best one would be one that is I can order as an "Option Delete".
  • Ajla I've been happy with both uConnect and the circa 2018 Kia system. That said both seem to be moving towards Superscreen Hell within the next model cycle.
  • Arthur Dailey The vehicle pictured is not 'The Batmobile'. Adam West drove the only true Batmobile. To paraphrase what Adam West said on The Big Bang Theory, "I did not have to say I am Batman, when I walked in to a room everyone knew who I was, including Julie Newmar".
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