QOTD: Why Aren’t EVs Becoming More Affordable?

Ford increased pricing on the F-150 Lightning EV substantially this week, citing “significant material cost increases and other factors.” The all-electric model now comes with an MSRP that ranges between $46,974 (for the base Pro trim) and $96,874 (for the Extended Range Platinum). All told, the decision has made the pickup anywhere from $6,000 to $8,500 more expensive than it was just a few days earlier. In exchange, Blue Oval has ever so slightly upgraded the maximum range of some of the lower trims. But some of us would probably prefer a more comprehensive explanation as to what’s causing EV prices to surge in general, because it’s not just Ford that’s been raising the sticker price of in-demand electric vehicles.

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GMC Redesigns Canyon for 2023, Adds AT4X Trim

With the Chevrolet Colorado being revealed a couple of weeks ago, you knew it wouldn’t be long before the crew at GMC rolled out their variation on a similar theme. Re-upping for 2023 in the once-again competitive midsize truck segment, the Canyon will apparently be focusing on its high-level (and high profit) trims.

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Ford Introduces Heritage Editions of Bronco and Bronco Sport

An inherent advantage to being a century-old company is having a deep well of history from which to draw – for better or worse. While some parts of Blue Oval corporate lore will likely never again see the light of day (what’s the over/under on a Pinto revival?), wide swaths of retro are ripe for exploitation a second go.


If one thinks the Bronco has already tweaked a twinge of years past, then these Heritage Editions are sure to crank the nostalgia meter to 11.

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The Life and Times of Edsel, a Ford Alternative by Ford (Part IV)

In our last edition of Abandoned History, we found ourselves in the earliest days of Edsel sales in 1958. The new company offered a full lineup of four sedan-based models and three different wagons. But because Edsel failed so spectacularly, 1958 was the only year it had a broad product offering. Four of seven models were eliminated before the company’s second model year.


Last time we covered the cheapest of the one-offs, the Pacer. Its near entry-level status confused customers as it wasn’t exactly a cheap vehicle at $2,700 ($27,973 adj.) before options like a heater or radio. Pacer was also based on a Ford, but priced more like a Mercury. Still, the Pacer found 19,057 customers in its only year; many more than the upmarket Citation found during its outing.  

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GM Files For Trademarks For Four Cadillac Celestiq Trims


General Motors has filed for four trademarks with the United States Patent and Trademark office.

The trademarks are believed to be related to trim-level names for the upcoming Cadillac Celestiq EV.

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Report: GM Requiring Customers to Spend $1,500 for OnStar


General Motors is reportedly making OnStar standard equipment for all new Buick, Cadillac, and GMC models. However, it's also been alleged that the company will be forcing customers of those brands into a three-year subscription for the "Connected Services Premium Plan" that'll cost roughly $1,500 and represent the latest example of how automakers are leveraging subscription fees to improve their overall profitability.


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Jeep Adds One Color to Gladiator. That’s It. That’s the Headline.

This post is less about bringing breaking news to the B&B and more about giving your author a chance to run photos of a Jeep in an obnoxious color which he greatly enjoys. The brand calls it High Velocity Yellow; I call it fantastic.

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Rare Rides Icons: The History of Kia's Larger and Full-size Sedans (Part XI)

Kia’s second attempt at a K7 (Cadenza in North America) arrived at a time when the company fully embraced a styling language of its own. More upscale and nicer to look at than the derivative generation of 2010 to 2016, the new Cadenza debuted in all global markets for 2017. Kia was hopeful the second Cadenza would sell better than the first one, particularly in North America. Any predictions on how that went?

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Meyers Manx Reborn as All-Electric Dune Buggy

The iconic Meyers Manx is one of those vehicles everyone recognizes, even if they don't quite know what it is. Developed in 1964 by Californian engineer, artist, boat builder, World War II veteran, and surfing enthusiast Bruce Meyers, the Manx became a popular way for people to convert ho-hum Volkswagen Beetles into truly capable dune buggies. It became an overnight success among those looking to dabble in off-road racing on the West Coast and was gradually embraced as a viable street rod. But it's probably best known for being America's de-facto fiberglass beach vehicle, ready for whatever kind of Surfin' Safari its owner had in mind.


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Nissan Z Proto Spec Markups Are Absurd [UPDATED]

Look, we knew there was a lot of hype around the new Nissan Z. Rightfully so, as our first drive showed. And we know that quantities of any new model from any brand are usually limited at launch in a normal year -- and supply-chain problems across the industry, along with the pandemic's lingering effects on production, have made 2022 anything but a normal year for autos.

Still, the markups being charged for Nissan Z Proto Specs strike us as absurd.

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Rare Rides Personas: Powel Crosley Junior, Tiny Cars, Radio, and Baseball (Part II)

We return today to our coverage of the life and times of Powel Crosley Junior, the first subject in our new Rare Rides Personas series. Born in Cincinnati in 1886, Crosley was the son of a lawyer and the eldest of four. From an early age, he showed adeptness at engineering and technology but lacked an interest in the classroom learning behind it. 


He and his brother Lewis built their first car - an EV wagon - at ages 12 and 10 to win a bet with their father. It was the first of many car ventures for Crosley, who was completely fascinated with the up-and-coming automobile. By age 21 he was raising funds to start a car company. 

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TTAC Throwback: 1980 Triumph TR8

Today's TTAC Throwback is a British treat.

Everybody thinks a Texan chicken farmer was the first to shove a grunty American 8-cylinder engine into a lithe Britsh chassis, but really Caroll Shelby was just one in a long line of builders to riff on that formula. Before WWII, Jensen built cars with Ford V8 power, and Railton used various Hudson chassis along with their superb inline-eight (and six) cylinder engines to build square-rigged hot rods that milord might use to travel quickly to those country house Saturday-through-Monday affairs in which the upper classes indulged.

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23,555 More Ferraris Recalled Over Brake Failure Risk



Ferrari has recalled 23,555 vehicles manufactured between 2005 and today, representing a sizable chunk of the brand's output. As with the recall Ferrari issued in October of 2021, the company remains worried about the potential of dangerous brake failure. Though your author imagines the physical threat this actually presents to vehicle owners is limited, because most Ferrari products spend their entire lives in climate-controlled garages as motionless baubles.


Still, it may pose some amount of risk to in-house mechanics and multi-millionaires who actually drive their collectible cars and aren't Jay Leno (he's sworn off the brand). So it's likely better for Ferrari to notify the public than simply playing the odds that nobody will notice for another 15 years.


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2022 Mazda MX-5 Miata Review - Driving Distilled


They’re coming for our cars. It may not be tomorrow, but indicators point toward a future where personal transportation options may be severely restricted. Gleaming alloy air-cars two lanes wide may be our transportation solution going forward.


From my stringback-gloved hands, I proclaim. While I’ll take the train should my commute dictate, I still find both solace and pleasure in engaging with a genuine driver’s car. A car that doesn’t need a “SPORT MODE” button conspicuously glaring next to the CVT drive selector knob. In the 2022 Mazda MX-5 Miata, the start button IS the sport mode.

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Rare Rides Icons: Lamborghini's Front-Engine Grand Touring Coupes (Part VII)

When we last left Lamborghini’s front-engine coupe timeline, Ferruccio Lamborghini found himself about out of time to designate a replacement for the 400GT 2+2. Touring’s Flying Star II two-seat shooting brake was radical and possessed neither the restrained GT styling Mr. Lamborghini desired, nor the full four-place capacity. The company turned to Bertone and design legend Marcelo Gandini, who proposed the four-seat Marzal. 


The Marzal’s design was as radical as the Flying Star if not more, and had gullwing doors and an interior filled with silver textile. After it debuted Ferruccio remarked how the Marzal was just a fun design exercise and was not intended to be a production car. Whether that statement was actually true remains unclear, but seems unlikely given the events that occurred post-Marzal. Lamborghini needed a real production design, and fast.

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  • Teddyc73 The Bronco just doesn't have enough editions and models.
  • ToolGuy @Matt, let me throw this at you:Let's say I drive a typical ICE vehicle 15,000 miles/year at a typical 18 mpg (observed). Let's say fuel is $4.50/gallon and electricity cost for my EV will be one-third of my gasoline cost - so replacing the ICE with an EV would save me $2,500 per year. Let's say I keep my vehicles 8 years. That's $20,000 in fuel savings over the life of the vehicle.If the vehicles have equal capabilities and are otherwise comparable, a rational typical consumer should be willing to pay up to a $20,000 premium for the EV over the ICE. (More if they drive more.)TL;DR: Why do they cost more? Because they are worth it (potentially).
  • Inside Looking Out Why EBFlex dominates this EV discussion? Just because he is a Ford expert?
  • Marky S. Very nice article and photos. I am a HUGE Edsel fan. I have always been fascinated with the "Charlie Brown of Cars." Allow me to make a minor correction to add here: the Pacer line was the second-from-bottom rung Edsel, not the entry-level trim. That would be the Edsel Ranger for 1958. It had the widest array of body styles. The Ranger 2-door sedan (with a "B-pillar", not a pillarless hardtop), was priced at $2,484. So, the Ranger and Pacer both used the smaller Ford body. The next two upscale Edsel's were based on the Mercury body, are were: Corsair, and, top-line Citation. Although the 1959 style is my fav. I would love a '58 Edsel Pacer 4-door hardtop sedan!
  • Lou_BC Stupid to kill the 6ft box in the crewcab. That's the most common Canyon/Colorado trim I see. That kills the utility of a small truck. The extended cab was a poor seller so that makes sense. GM should have kept the diesel. It's a decent engine that mates well with the 6 speed. Fuel economy is impressive.