By on June 16, 2022

Lyriq

In 2017, General Motors bowed out of the European market. The tactical retreat came after nearly two decades of struggling to make the region profitable and freed up cash the company could use to expand more profitable endeavors located elsewhere. This basically entailed widening its footprint in China, eliminating modestly sized passenger vehicles from its North American lineup, and setting aside any extra money for electric vehicle development. However, the automaker’s Western clientele has been slower to embrace EVs than hoped, even with gas prices becoming astonishingly high, and market analysts expect the United States to be the very last developed nation to see alternative powertrains go mainstream.

One possible solution for this conundrum is to sell those all-electric vehicles elsewhere — namely Europe. 

According to a report from Bloomberg, there have been murmurings within GM that it may begin exporting the Cadillac Lyriq to the European Union. Talks are said to be preliminary, with unnamed sources also suggesting that subsequent EVs could follow. This includes the Hummer EV that’s supposed to commence production by 2023.

From Bloomberg:

Broadening GM’s offering would expand its presence in a market where the company currently only sells luxury vehicles and the Corvette sports car in small numbers.

A GM spokesman said no final decisions had been made.

The move would be a renewed push in the region after the company sold its mass-market Opel and Vauxhall brands in 2017 to what is now Stellantis, following two decades of losses.

GM has recently revived the dormant Hummer brand, starting production of the electric pickup in December.

The nameplate was controversial among environmentalists with the Hummer H2 model that got about 10 miles to the gallon.

The automaker acquired the Hummer brand from military contractor AM General in the late 1990s, at the height of the U.S. SUV boom.

While the new Hummer won’t have to worry about today’s fuel prices, environmental activists may eventually realize that a 9,000-pound automobile (that’s over 4,000 kilograms, in case you’re European) probably isn’t going to be all that energy efficient either. But that’s hardly the only headwind GM will be confronting if it moves ahead with this plan. Europe’s new-vehicle sales have been on the decline for almost a year straight and the region is experiencing record inflation and crippling declines in consumer confidence following COVID lockdowns. The war in Ukraine has exacerbated these problems immensely, making it seem like it could be a bad time for GM to invest.

But it might work on a longer timeline. Europe is presently planning to prohibit the sale of gasoline (or diesel) powered automobiles by 2035 and Cadillac has set a goal to transition its entire lineup to EVs by 2030. In fact, stringent regulatory pressures were allegedly one of the reasons GM decided to sell off Opel and Vauxhall in 2017. Though we’d be surprised to learn it was the main reason considering the automaker had endured twenty years of consecutive financial losses selling to the market.

If you’re wondering what the real odds of General Motors taking another whack at Europe happen to be, the scenario seems quite plausible. Late in 2021, the former Cadillac VP Mahmoud Samara was tasked with trying to figure out how to restart operations across the pond. Considering he’s since been promoted to the president and managing director of General Motors Europe, one might assume the resulting strategy was well-received. We also know that the automaker wants to launch a mobility startup that foregoes the traditional dealer model — and that’s something that’ll be much easier for it to pull off there than here in North America.

[Images: General Motors]

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48 Comments on “Cadillac EVs May Be Bound for Europe...”


  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Good. Keep that garbage in Europe. If they want overpriced and underdelivering crap they can pay for it

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      If there’s anyone that I’d just love to see the black helicopters swoop in, take all your ICE vehicles, and leave nothing but EV’s to drive, it’s you. At least then the current government would be living up to your expectations.

      Yes, it’s childish. I still can’t think of anyone who’d deserve it more.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Good luck to GM selling the Lyriq anywhere – gads, that thing’s ugly.

    Snark aside, the idea makes all kinds of sense.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I like its looks, but I didn’t at first.

    @Matt – Your opening premise doesn’t compute, because GM sold out its entire allocation of 2023 Lyriq reservations (~25k, I think) in about 4 hours on May 19th.

    If GM couldn’t sell EVs in the past, it’s because:
    a) The Bolt is dorky-looking and had a stop-sale due to its battery recall.
    b) They can’t build enough batteries.

    Today, it’s not as though GM’s (or anybody else’s) EVs are collecting dust on dealer lots. That’s just misleading.

    The simpler story is that GM may consider reentering the European market. I’d say that’s crazy.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      I like the looks as well it has grown on me. I doubt many vehicles are accumulating on dealer lots with the chip shortages.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Cadillac has not had much success in Europe in our lifetime. To do anything significant there, the product must be superior to what is already available, and at a competitive price. They also have a reputation for oversized vehicles (especially by European standards) and mediocre quality.
      Europeans would need a good reason to go out on a limb with Cadillac. This would be a real uphill battle.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Who in Europe is going to buy a Lyriq when there is a Q4 e-tron available?

  • avatar

    worst run firm in autos. at $31 per share, it’s off about half in the past year.

    Barra is incompetent like her buddy Biden.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The Detroit automaker said Tuesday that it made $10.02 billion for the full year. And it predicted record pretax earnings in 2022 of $13 billion to $15 billion and net income of $9.4 billion to $10.8 billion.

      https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2022-02-01/record-sales-prices-drive-gm-profit-up-56-to-10b-last-year

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        It’s a bear market. Even Exxon – EXXON, which has been printing more money than the f**king Federal Reserve, is down about +/-20% from a week ago. I guess that’s Biden’s fault too.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          We know, Trump was the only President who had any effect on stuff. All bad and all his fault. Biden can’t do anything though and nothing from inflation to people falling off of C-17s trying to get out of Kabul is his fault.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @FreedMike–Add the rising global temperatures, fires in the West, droughts in the West, earth quakes, and the global shortages and inflation all Biden’s fault. Heir Trump with the help of Valdamir Putin will eliminate all these things. If you complain then off to prison or possibly an execution. Do we have an problems?

  • avatar

    should have called this styling disaster Aztec or the LowIQ

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Much better looking than an Aztec. If they are reliable without the battery problems and if the dealers don’t get greedy about the pricing it will sell. The Lyriq is much better looking than a Tesla and priced competitively for what it is.

      • 0 avatar

        their stock is in the toilet, down 50% 12 months. $31. I sold at $52.

        Buickman
        Founder
        GeneralWatch.com
        jdollinger.com
        DollingerDifference.com

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I’m no GM fanboy, but the company is clearly making money. The stock price is probably reflective of the current bear market than GM’s ability to make money, which they are clearly doing…unless you’d like to argue that the company’s pulling a Worldcom.

          All car companies are in the dumps right now…even Tesla is down like 40% from a couple of months ago.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I’d just call it Iq!

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Ultium’s got electrolytes.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Hum.
    That guy who did the move to NYC. OK ed the caddy coffee shop. He s gone right?
    2- didnt they just LEAVE Europe?
    3- Oh! Got it. Michigan is a 420 is legal place. Caddy dudes were high AF ! when they jumped into this idea. It will be another massive GM fail. ( proviso- sales goal is not 250 /yr )

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Lyriq hasn’t failed yet all 25,000 planned production units for the 2023 MY sold out in 4 hours of the first day of orders. I would give it some more time before closing the curtains.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I don’t buy into the whole “reservations sold out” thing, but let’s say all 25,000 reservation holders actually go through with their purchase (which, of course, assumes those new glasses they ordered never arrived). That kind of volume is minor compared to the Model Y.

      I think the Lyriq will be a bust, and I think Cadillac is going about the whole electrification thing the wrong way. If they’re OK with 25,000 units per year, then why not bring out something truly spectacular, versus another damn mommymobile? These guys need a brand reset…bad.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        It is reasonable that Cadillac would cut the orders for the first year of production to 25k for a first year EV. Tesla has been making EVs for about a decade so they should have more experience. If after the first year Cadillac is not above 25k on the Lyriq then GM would have some real problems and the Lyriq would be a failure. Too soon to declare the Lyriq a bust. An EV suv/crossover is what will sell and not an EV sedan. I would like to see more sedans but crossovers and suvs are what is selling so if mommy mobiles are selling then that will be what is made whether we like it or not. Make what will sell.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Those who can, do (build cars.)

    While those who can’t, are instead relegated to cast about in ever more desperate attempts to get hold how whatever handouts someone, anyone! anywhere! may be handing out to also-rans at the moment.

    If, and only if, Western governments and central banks gets away with responding to this latest “recession” by bailing out idiots to the tune of tens of trillions stolen from more competent people; as has been their unwavering custom for the past 50-150 years: That just about _may_ provide That Great “Luxury as in Kardashian” “Brand” (as in, not car) Cadillac; with a paying audience for if not the cordless cars themselves then perhaps the paper supposedly “backed” by empty promises about cordless cars keeping up with Elon von Mars in the race to ever larger Fed welfare checks.

    Unless, of course, the Chinese get tired of supporting the sh&*%t show before then, and stops keeping it all afloat.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      You’ve got another thing coming if you think it’s just Western governments that respond to recessions by bailing out idiots.

      https://www.bloomberg.com/professional/blog/whats-next-for-china-evergrande-crushed-by-debt-quicktake/

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        You’re no doubt right. Heck, bailing out idiots, is specifically what any and all governments larger than Jefferson’s, exist to do in the first place. It’s what they do. And all they do.

        In China there is, at least for now, still some occasional sliver of something else going on. The share of what’s attempted passed of as “the economy” which comprises of nothing more than simply stealing, redistributing to idiots and squandering what previous generations built up, hasn’t reached quite 100% yet. If for no other reason, than because previous generations over there never really built up that much. Instead busying themselves Making China’s Hope and Change Leap Forward Great Again, and other such nonsense which only the truly gullible, well indoctrinated and idiotic would ever fall for.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    I don’t have any insight into the wisdom of GM going back to Europe, but I will say that having lived there for a few months, and visited several other times, I’ve seen a grand total of one Cadillac on European roads. That of course being the immaculate ’59 Eldorado a tasteful gentleman was taking for a leisurely Sunday morning cruise in the right lane of the A3 Autobahn outside Frankfurt. Perhaps that gentleman is the target market for the Lyriq.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    This is significant as it suggests a pattern in non-Tesla EV sales. As I determined last Fall, Ford was exporting Mach E to European dealers at a 2:1 ratio I speculated because games were being played with orders and deliveries in order to save face on the model’s slow start. Now Ford has had a decent size European presence for decades and in Europe the EV is perhaps a bit more chic than stateside so having genuine orders there vs what I argued were shell games in USDM is believable. However now we have GM looking to do the same, but GM *sold* its foothold in Europe several years ago and I can’t imagine has much of a dealer network in its Chevrolet brand on the continent. Something seems like its up, almost as if Detroit either cannot or does not want to sell the bulk of its EV product in USDM. Whose afraid of the big bad Musk?

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2021/09/ford-mustang-mach-e-passes-police-assessment/#comment-10053726

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I would be inclined to agree with your analysis except that it just does not track with our experience locally on the ground on the West Coast (which, together with the urban Northeast, represents something like 30% of the total US market). Every one of these mainstream EVs (along with many of the PHEV products) is unobtainium at dealers, with people waiting months or paying five-figure markups to get examples sooner. We are planning a purchase at some point to replace our well-performing but increasingly worn-looking Highlander, so I’m keeping my ear to the ground, but current market conditions in the EV and PHEV SUV space are keeping me out of the market. If the OEMs needed to sell a lot more of these, they could easily do so by shipping them to the West Coast.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “they could easily do so by shipping them to the West Coast.”

        Precisely my overall point. Prior to February I would argue its the shell game of providing enough inventory to stay under demand in certain markets and exporting the rest, but things have gotten a lot more jacked up since then so now its probably a multitude of things. How is Tesla supply on the ground there?

        Different topic, an E36 vs E46 but:

        https://pittsburgh.craigslist.org/cto/d/pittsburgh-99-bmw-e36-323i-convertible/7497177532.html

        I’d be on it if I was in the market, especially since he has what appears to be the factory removable hard top (which I think was an option). I’d probably want to source new buckets (or re-cover) but otherwise looks pretty clean. Seems to have been owned by an attorney as well… whose domain expired :D

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Too bad it’s a 323 rather than a 328, but that plus s a good-quality recover of the front seats is not a bad deal in this market.

          I got distracted over the weekend because Carmax had a gorgeous, low-mile 2013 335is manual convertible in Portland, but it sold. That’s probably the single BMW I’d like to own the most. It had an unfortunate white-over-red color choice but was otherwise exactly as I would have ordered one of those new.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            There are 37 BMW 3-Series in Washington and Oregon available right now at Manheim. Only three are convertibles and are all M3s as shown here:

            https://imgur.com/a/OUOhuI5

            The ’01 is of interest and as you can see he’s running it in Simulcast at the Wednesday sale but is also open to a $10K offer with Manheim feeling its a $9,500 ride. A VW dealer has it and evidently could not get $9,9 off the block, probably be open to a cash offer if it checked out as a buy.

            The ’04 looked a little beat when I went into it hence no further picture. There is what looks like carbon fiber on the hood but a lot of dings and road rash, which suggests at some point in its life it stopped being cherished. If you are interested I can get all the pics of it, its got probably 35.

            The ’98 I included for S&G… WTF.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I feel a limited appetite for putting up with S54 finickiness, so my tastes in E46 tend to run toward 330i ZHP rather than M3.

            But in the end the 335is was a distraction. If I’m going to spend a lot of money on a car in the near future it’s going to be a family vehicle. Wife keeps pointing out every XC90 T8 she sees, although also willing to look at the X5 xDrive45e. Either way, European options packaging is such that I’d be spending $80k to get one that has the same feature content as my fully loaded Highlander!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You really, really want the extended warranty for Volvos after 2016. Personally I’d stick with the Highlander and I believe yours is a hybrid is it not? The MY19 XC90 hybrids range from 47,0 to 61,0 for the R-design (seems to be most of them) with the Momentum 52,2-61,5 with highest miles at 56,084. Add another $5K for MY20s. Recharge didn’t come out until MY22 and there are only two: 72,9 and 73,0 both under 5K miles.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yep, would be buying either of those new with an extended warranty lasting through the expected 6-year ownership period. Would want a Volvo to have the ’22+ Extended Range powertrain, because it actually simplifies the gas engine (just turbocharged, no supercharger) while relying more on electric power and improving all of electric range, power, electric top speed, and gas mileage.

            The financially sensible move would be to keep the Highlander (owned free and clear) but there is some question about whether a six-year-old Toyota with a few scratches and dings inside and out will be awkward in certain social settings both of us have more or less no choice but to participate in.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I don’t think I’d buying anything until the market settles down a touch.

            And a 335? Oh, yeah…I’d want one. GREAT car. Probably the last really good BMW.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @dal

            “a six-year-old Toyota with a few scratches and dings inside and out will be awkward in certain social settings both of us have more or less no choice but to participate in.”

            The perils of keeping up with the Joneses. :D

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Got to have a Jones for this
            Jones for that
            This runnin’ with the Joneses boy
            Just ain’t where it’s at
            You gonna come back around
            To the sad sad truth..
            The dirty lowdown

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yuuuuup.

            I had no idea whatsoever, until my social circle evolved after a few promotions and my kid’s attendance at a preschool in a neighborhood made up mostly of multimillionaires. All of a sudden every time I meet up with someone they arrive in a GLS or a Range Rover. Oddly enough the Bolt feels less awkward because of the green cred.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Saw it several times around my neighborhood. It didn’t wow me by any means and the back end is sort of a mess.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    I am by no means a GM-fanboy (I prefer my car companies un-bailed out, or financially competent if you prefer), but the Lyric is pretty good looking. That said, the only love Cadillac and Hummer will get in Europe are the rich Russians and Middle Easterners who equate status with bling. GM has never held a prestige position there nor will they ever.

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