By on May 20, 2022

Tesla

Continuing a nationwide & industry trend towards more electric vehicles, more Americans are registering EVs.

According to Automotive News, data firm Experian reports that nearly 158,689 EVs were registered in the first quarter of 2022. Tesla, with 113,882 EV registrations accounted for nearly 72 percent and stood alone in first place by a wide margin.

South Korean automaker Kia came in second with 8,450 registrations, with its EV6 and Niro leading the way. Ford also secured a place within the list of successful EV registrations with 7,407, a 91 percent increase over the first quarter of 2021, driven largely in part by an 80 percent spike in Mustang Mach-E registrations, along with the first 54 F-150 Lightening’s being registered in the quarter.

EV registrations at Hyundai, Nissan, and Volkswagen also rose in comparison to the first quarter of 2021.

The Chevrolet Bolt saw its registrations drop precipitously from 9,099 a year earlier to just 479, due to battery issues and a large recall.

Rounding out the field with other EV players such as Polestar, Rivian, and Lucid Motors had registrations of 2,384, 701, and 308 respectively.

[Image: Tesla]

Become a TTAC insider. Get the latest news, features, TTAC takes, and everything else that gets to the truth about cars first by subscribing to our newsletter.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

120 Comments on “Electric Vehicle Registrations Surge Across the U.S....”


  • avatar
    jkross22

    $6.29/gallon for 91 near me. If I were in the market, I’d at least get a hybrid. **cking absurd.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      $4.50 for premium here in Denver. Still silly. I’ve actually been using the start stop feature on my car and it’s getting me another few mpg.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Paid about $4.09 for regular at Sam’s Club in NKY a few days ago which isn’t bad especially when it is over $6 a gallon in California. Been averaging around 50 mpgs in my Maverick Hybrid but that is stop and go moderate driving with a little interstate.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      Around $4.25 here. I’ve got a trip to Florida planned for October and seriously thinking about driving. Round trip 1st class tickets for the Mrs. and I are $2,000 (and I only fly 1st). Even if premium averages $6 a gallon in the South this fall, I can still drive it for between $600-$700 in fuel costs using the most pessimistic numbers for my vehicle. Couple nights in a hotel at the midway point I can cover with credit card points.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      The oil companies are making record, multi-billion dollar quarterly profits. This situation is brought about by corporate greed, with the excuse being Russia having invaded the Ukraine. Exxon, Shell, Chevron, etc. are not your friend.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The oil companies are making the same percentage profits, the volume of dollars has gone up along with costs. The high cost of motor fuels was brought on by political decisions in Washington, and that in turn has caused inflation as the cost of transportation of everything you buy has increased.

        More to the point of the article, the “surge” in new vehicle registrations of EVs is dwarfed by the still-depressed sales of ICE vehicles. Out of 3.35 million light vehicles sold, there were 158,689 EVs? That’s 4.7% of the total.

        When you start at such a low number of EVs sold, the percentage increase looks huge. But there’s still the OTHER 3,131,000 vehicles with ICE engines that will run during the Summer blackouts, here in California and elsewhere.

        If you have solar panels and a storage system, you might want to use it to keep your refrigerator running, instead of charging your EV. If you don’t have solar, it might be wise to keep the old ICE vehicle you have, instead of trading it in. You might need it to recharge your cellphone.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    The last gasp cash grab of the oil industry…

    • 0 avatar
      David Tuscon

      Yup. Hybrid here too.

    • 0 avatar
      David Tuscon

      Eventually it will cost more to charge than to fill up with gas.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @David Tuscon: It’s already happened at some SuperCharging locations. But, unlike with gasoline, you can do the equivalent of drilling for oil in your own backyard. It’s also easier for retailers to set up for-pay charging stations than gas pumps so more opportunity for competition. They can put chargers in any parking spot and bigbox stores and malls with large parking lots can install acres of panels with storage and sell charging on the cheap.

        • 0 avatar
          SoCalMikester

          gas fuelling infrastructure is crazy expensive with lots of stuff going on underground thats never seen

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @mcs–The Walmart near me had several charging stations but they took them out. I haven’t seen too many charging stations but I have seen more EVs lately so I know they are out there.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I’m seeing more EV’s on the road and I’ve seen new charging stations. $2.04 – $2.20/litre fuel will drive the rate of change. Large trucks will become too costly to drive. I’m looking at $270 to fill my tank from near empty. I’m happy about finally putting a deposit on a diesel Colorado with much better fuel economy.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou_BC–Congrats on finally finding a diesel Colorado. Are you going to keep your F-150 as a backup or you going to sell it? Trucks are still selling well where I live and people are getting some really high prices for F series trucks despite high mileage and age. I haven’t seen a letup in demand despite fuel prices rising.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Jeff S – I’ll see what they’ll give me on trade. Probably sell privately. My son was telling me that the small dealer chain he works for sells most of their used vehicles in the USA. Big money to be made by shipping them south.

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            When you have solar panels, charging is basically free.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou_BC–I would definitely check out all the options if you decide to sell your F-150. I was shocked I got as much as I did on the Buick and I really didn’t want to sell it but since my wife and I will be moving from Kentucky to Arizona I would have to pay to have it shipped and I had a firm production date on the Maverick and was going to wait for it. Housing prices have really gone up where I live but I am reluctant to sell now until they put my new home under construction and have a better idea of when it will be finished. I don’t mind moving and renting a little early but not more than a few months. Construction of my new home is suppose to start in mid to late June.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike A

      Do you know anything about demand and supply and the supply chain issues. The price increases are in part due to a lack of refineries in the US – thanks to the environmental and anti development lobbies. So don’t do the knee jerk anti business reaction.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        The refinery capacity in the USA continues to decrease and it is very hard to get a refinery built because of the regulations and no one wants them in their backyard. Some mega refineries have been built in 3rd World countries where there is less regulation and most of the product is for export. Also oil companies see that there will be less demand for their product in the future and are answerable to their stockholders who want to minimize investment and maximize dividends. This is true of most corporations including the auto industry that have become less willing to take risks for future profits. Adam on Rare Classic Cars gives a detailed talk on what it takes to develop a new car and how decisions are made and how price is determined. It is not all greed.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I’ve read that it costs 5 – 15 billion over 5 – 7 years to build a new refinery. None of the articles I read broke down costs. Blaming regulations on a 5 – 15 billion dollar build is weak sauce IMO. ROI is the final metric.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou_BC–Regulations are still part of the reason but not as much as they use to be. Return on Investment is the biggest factor and investors demanding more profitability and higher dividends. Also oil companies see a more reduced demand in oil and gas as alternatives grow in viability. Better to sell less and make a higher profit or at the very least not expand too much. Take the extra money and buy back your own stock.

          • 0 avatar
            zerofoo

            $5 – 15 billion – IF you can get the permits to build.

            Regulations do not only add cost – sometimes they prohibit the project in its entirety.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            The most important “regulation” by far is that with any commercial development, whether it’s a Starbucks or an oil refinery, the folks in the neighborhood have the right to say “no” to said development. And given that oil refineries smell, pollute, and blow up, the neighbors’ concerns are pretty rational.

            I wouldn’t want the potential for stuff like this near my home; would you?

            youtube.com/watch?v=kugNBHRG_bU

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @zerofoo–Agree if you can get the permits and if you can it could take years. If you are an independent you cannot afford to take that risk especially with the ups and downs in the oil market. If your are Exxon Mobil or Chevron it makes more sense to buy back stock shares and make your stock worth more.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @FreedMike–“The most important “regulation” by far is that with any commercial development, whether it’s a Starbucks or an oil refinery, the folks in the neighborhood have the right to say “no” to said development. And given that oil refineries smell, pollute, and blow up, the neighbors’ concerns are pretty rational.

            I wouldn’t want the potential for stuff like this near my home; would you?”

            Exactly no one wants a smelly polluting oil refinery in their backyard and you cannot blame them. There has not been a major oil refinery built in the USA since the mid 70s and refinery capacity in the USA has declined since then. Many of the majors are building mega refineries in third world countries where there is less regulation and exporting refined products. We will be using oil for many decades but the oil companies do see that there will be declining demand and eventually the replacement of oil albeit it might be 50 or more years.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The US actually has excess refining capacity, much of that being in the Gulf.

        But US refiners are using that (and more) to export fuel – such as to South America.

        Refined fuel is the #1 US export.

        The big refiners have also bought up the smaller operators to only shut them down.

        That’s why markets like California is controlled by a duopoly – so when both refiners serving California both plan to do “maintenance” (cutting production) at the same time, the price of gas in California shoots up.

        Same thing applies when one or the other experiences the near yearly fire/accident, which really causes the price to spike.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Lou_BC–I don’t know if you have Carvana but I would check Carvana as well. I sold my 2012 Buick LaCrosse E-Assist for 4k more than I paid for it 2 1/2 years earlier. The Buick GMC dealership near me offered me 5k less than Carvana. Carvana came with the check and finished the paper work at my home and picked the car up. The guy who came told me his father got 10k more for an F-250 than he paid from Carvana that he owned for a couple of years. You should definitely check Carvana and other online buyers.

    • 0 avatar

      Tylanner: agree,but possibly for different reasons. If you were producing a product that your government, and many other governments around the world, wants to decrease (or ban) the use of, what would you do? I’d probably do exactly what the oil industry is doing; shut down some refineries to make the most profit I can before my sales volume drops due to my product not being purchased at the same volume I was used to selling. I cannot imagine any person who is being truthful about it that would say it’s okay if I see a 50% or higher drop in my income.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        @THX:
        I do appreciate you telling the truth about why prices are high: no matter whether this is the first, last or intermediate “gasp” for these guys, they’re jacking up prices because they can, and that’s the way it’s always been.

        And I don’t have much sympathy for these guys. They’ve been making untold billions off this racket for decades now, and a great deal of that money is re-invested in buying off politicians so that the racket remains.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          The oil companies do see the handwriting on the wall and they are answerable to the stockholders who want more earnings per share. There is greed but its not just the oil companies its any publicly traded companies under the pressure of stockholder to get higher short term earnings.

        • 0 avatar

          @Freed: It wasn’t an explanation of why prices are high. There are many factors which I mentioned is just one and possibly small one at that. I do get what you’re saying, absolutely, and agree with much of what you shared. Thanks!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I have a hybrid Maverick and I am glad I got it.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      They delivered it? Congratulations.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @ajla–Yes after 8 1/2 months I finally got one. I have only seen 4 on the roads and 2 Santa Cruz. My Maverick has been getting somewhere between 42 to 50 mpg depending on where I drive. Similar to the Prius hybrid system city driving gets the best mpgs because of the regenerative system. Very smooth and quiet. I have had several people ask me about it especially when I go out in it.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Jeff, can I kindly request a user review? Would love to hear one of ‘us’ chime in with their impressions.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “I have a hybrid Maverick and I am glad I got it.”

      Have you taken care of the three decals out for the Escape pickup yet?

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Love my Escape pickup especially with higher gas prices.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Jeff S – congratulations.

          I’ve had a nightmare experience finding a diesel ZR2.

          GM had shifted the deadline for ordering. The sales manager of my son’s dealer called in a favour to the sales manager of the local Chevy dealer. He was lazy and fooked both of us by dragging his azz all the while promising the moon.

          Most dealers I’ve contacted wanted to sell me high end models or lied saying they could get exactly what I wanted but when called out, they couldn’t. Most were advertising sold units on their web sites. I contacted almost every dealer in BC and about 1/2 in Alberta. I found one in Alberta but I noticed that after I left my message they jacked the price by $7,000. I found one in a small town but someone else beat me to it.

          I had given up.

          I was bored at work and on a break checked out a few small dealers in my region. One listed a blue ZR2 diesel crew base trim. I called immediately. It was unsold with zero deposits. I told the sales person that I’d like to place a deposit. She was confused and asked, “Don’t you want to know about the features?” I laughed. “Nope. Been hunting for 2 months. It’s as close to what I want as it gets.”

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou_BC–Your persistence paid off. I have experienced the lazy salespeople as well. My salesperson at my local Ford dealer did expend the extra effort and seemed like he cared which is unusual today.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Jeff S – I found a dealer west of me that had good sales staff. The fellow put some effort into trying to find me something. They were unable to locate one after another buyer beat me to putting down a deposit.

            The chain my son works for was good to deal with other than the owner’s son is a spoiled brat. He was annoyed that I had pestered him a few times for a ZR2 but at least they were honest and upfront about not having anything for me.

            It’s pathetic that out of 20 odd dealers I contacted, only 2 didn’t play games or felt entitled. I fired off a complaint to GM. They had a lame excuse that GM dealers are separate private entities that are working in hard times. I replied, “Your answer shows that you condone false and misleading advertising. You don’t have a problem with your dealers lying to customers?” They then replied, “We’ve documented your concerns”.
            It isn’t just Chevy. The local Dodge/Ram/Chrysler dealer is awful. They had a 3 year old ZR2 priced higher than new retail. Virtually all their units were absurdly priced. The Ford dealer has all of their new units marked up. They even started removing window stickers and deleting them form their web page.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Good on you. I’m enamored with the Maverick…just deciding whether I need the pickup bed or just do a RAV4 Prime.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Dave M–I almost didn’t order a Maverick because of the smaller bed but the hybrid power train and the price was the determining factor. I considered the Santa Cruz as well. It was more expensive to buy a new or used late model midsize pickup for what I paid for the Maverick and I got the XLT which is the mid level trim which was still cheaper than midsize base models. The Maverick even has more head and leg room than most midsize trucks. I wanted a pickup but if you don’t need a pickup or just don’t care then a RAV4 is good. Really happy with the Maverick despite the long wait.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Just too lazy to look it up—does the Santa Cruz have a hybrid option?

          It sure sounds like Ford could make a killing on the Mavericks if they really wanted to. I would think that if an automaker wants to get product on the ground badly enough, even in conditions like this, they’d find a way to do so.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            The Santa Cruz doesn’t offer a hybrid but with the Maverick it is the base engine. If the Maverick were not available I might have bought the Santa Cruz but for the price and it being a hybrid it was a better buy for me.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “ Have you taken care of the three decals out for the Escape pickup yet?”

        My mistake. Autocorrect is absolutely horrid.

        Have you taken care of the three *recalls out for the Escape pickup yet?

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          No recalls everything is better than I expected. Love my new Maverick.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Congrats, enjoy the truck and ignore the sourpuss.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “Congrats, enjoy the truck and ignore the sourpuss.”

            Huh? If anything I am showing how much I care.

            I mean when there are recalls for fuel tank damage, improperly attached rear seat belts, and trailer brakes that may fail, shouldn’t people be aware? Or do you consider those annoyance issues?

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Since he just picked it, I’d assume the recalls were handled before delivery. I’m trying to think of a vehicle that’s never been recalled. I can’t.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “Since he just picked it, I’d assume the recalls were handled before delivery. I’m trying to think of a vehicle that’s never been recalled. I can’t.”

            Where did anyone indicate that the escape pickup was the only vehicle to be recalled?

            That would absurd. In fact, numerous Fords outside of the escape pickup have been recalled this month.

  • avatar

    Nissan makes EVs? Do they still sell Leafs (or Leaves)?

  • avatar

    GM spends the most money on EV’s and yet they are at the bottom in sales. Even the Leaf outsells the worthless Bolt.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      True for now but let’s give GM some more time to see what happens. Battery technology and infrastructure will have a lot to do with the future of EVs. The major auto companies have the capacity and cost structure to eventually lower the price of vehicles but the investment will take years to recover the cost.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    The original article that this article was based off of is highly suspect.

    But, if we take the numbers at face value, it paints a pretty dim picture for the fake vehicle industry. Between many brands and models, they could only manage 50k registrations per month. Compared to ICE industry which had millions registered in that same time frame. So 0.5%-1% are EVs (taking an annualized US sales of 13 million).

    Further this is only because Tesla had chips. No other reason. When Teslas bubble bursts you’ll see those numbers drop. It will be Interesting to see if the second quarter holds up in the same way.

    But all of these numbers are highly suspect. It says Ford has 54 fake lightnings registered. How can that be? Ford themselves said they started shipping fake lightnings in April and the first deliveries started in April 26th. That is not the first quarter.

    So that 54 number is BS as is the rest of the numbers. Plus we were told on this site by a commenter that Tesla sold 300k vehicles in the first quarter. And that poster is never worn just ask they.

    • 0 avatar
      WalterRohrl

      You sound more desperate than usual. Driving around it becomes obvious that while there are very few regular cars available on dealer lots, there are exactly zero Electric ones available to buy and take home today, all are backordered. All are capacity constrained currently, even Tesla, just take a look at the wait times. But there’s a reason Tesla keeps building new production plants around the world, supposedly (per you) lagging sales is not one of them…

      Lightning is brand new, I expect that Ford Corporate could register 54 of them themselves to distribute to press fleets etc in the first quarter. It might fail, it might not, the towing thing is a red herring, the vast majority of halftons on the road at any given time aren’t towing anything, many (most?) never tow at all, just like Teslas can tow as well as any other CUV, yet they rarely do. Seems like plenty of market to capture there for Ford, at least until everyone else figures it out…

      Kia EV6 and Hyundai Ioniq5 are brand new to the market as well, those numbers will surely grow. Polestars are starting to pop up around here, and I saw my first Rivian the other day, it won’t be the last, it’s a good looking and usefully shaped truck.

      Every quarter of EV sales is larger than the last one as a total percentage of sales. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize that the tipping point is near (or has already occurred), and scale will only increase things, especially as model proliferation grows with more diverse models appealing to more segments of the total market.

      But I realize EVs aren’t for you and some others and that’s fine. Enjoy your $6 gas and $8 diesel, or if it isn’t quite at that point yet where you are, it will be soon, it’s closer to that than back at $1… Just think of all the money you saved not vacationing in Europe while still being able to have the same experience at the gas station back here in the States! I like my big pickup as much as the next guy and thankfully can afford to fill it, but I really only use it when I absolutely need to nowadays and it’s nice not seeing as many of them on the roads anymore, I suspect others are doing the same.

      In the meantime, the 1% or whatever number you say it is per quarter currently will be enjoying 95% of their trips at pennies per KwH while charging overnight at home (equivalent to $1 or so gas) or during the day for free with their solar panels. And when they want to commute across the country like everyone of course always does at least twice a month, they’ll take the minivan in the other garage bay or just fly. Good for them!

      • 0 avatar
        NigelShiftright

        All EV fun and games until the power lines go dead. This is from that well-known rightwing MAGA source, National Public Radio:

        https://www.npr.org/2022/05/20/1100327262/much-of-the-u-s-could-see-power-blackouts-this-summer-a-grid-assessment-reveals

        So let’s get some more nukes and natural gas plants on line as part of the deal, mmmkay?

        • 0 avatar
          WalterRohrl

          I haven’t listened to NPR in ages but doesn’t seem complete, more Chicken Little than anything really.

          If there’s a blackout it’ll likely be during the highest demand part of the day. Most EVers charge at night when demand is lowest, that’s why it’s cheaper. In addition not everyone charges from empty to full every day, like gas cars if your EV has decent range you don’t need to fill up every day/night.

          Worst worst case if everything is blacked out, then gas stations aren’t remaining open either. But if they can run a generator, so can anyone run their house with one including a charger.

          Worst worst worst case, while I know plenty of people with EVs, I don’t know any for whom it’s currently their ONLY car in the driveway. If the EV won’t charge for a few days, they’ll take the other one. Or rent one, same as when any of their cars is in the shop or whatever.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “or during the day for free with their solar panels.”
        “they’ll take the minivan in the other garage bay”

        I can buy a lot of $6/gal fuel for the price of solar panels or getting a second vehicle for road trips or trading in my car for a Model 3.
        EVs are gaining in popularity but your last two paragraphs were just unnecessary snark.

        • 0 avatar
          dartman

          I bought a 7.5kw solar system in 2015 for $15k (after 30% tax credit) I was averaging $225/mo for electricity, but haven’t paid a dime in 7 years in sunny NorCal. The system has paid for itself and I am now money in the bank. I plan to wait until the market cools and buy a F150 Lightning with home battery back-up option. Tesla or LG batteries or currently selling installed here for $16k for a 13.5kw battery so that’s a no brainer. Lif is good.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            So about 2500 gallons of fuel assuming permanent $6/gal fuel prices?

          • 0 avatar
            dartman

            Another way to look at it: Since my system has paid for itself, I can buy 450 gallons of fuel annually at a $6 price with the cash I would have given to PG&E. I’m not even including the small amount (<$200)they pay me for excess power production.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            But it likely takes several years to reach that breakeven point.

            By all means, folks should do what works best for their specific situation and I don’t have a grudge against rooftop solar but it is still a big upfront expensive and it won’t always end up being as favorable.

          • 0 avatar
            WalterRohrl

            “So about 2500 gallons of fuel assuming permanent $6/gal fuel prices?”

            As a onetime cost about that and then it just keeps filling the tank in (more or less) perpetuity AND may even increase the resale value of the home if selling.

            Whereas 2500 gallons of gas gets you what, 25,000 miles if you run a TRX, 50,000 miles in a Chevy Colorado, and 100k miles in a Corolla? $6 gas is just not an attractive proposition if it can be avoided.

          • 0 avatar
            WalterRohrl

            “But it likely takes several years to reach that breakeven point.

            By all means, folks should do what works best for their specific situation and I don’t have a grudge against rooftop solar but it is still a big upfront expensive and it won’t always end up being as favorable.”

            Many (at least somewhat progressive) cities did and still do offer attractive financing plans for solar installs, I’ll bet most solar install companies do as well. It is not necessarily a complete upfront expense, just like any other four or five figure expense. I haven’t looked into it lately since interest have been increasing but 2-3% was quite common within the last few years. The expense for a quite large solar array is quite a bit less than the current average new car transaction price. Yes, it assumes that you have a house to place them on top of, which obviously excludes a lot of people, but then again there are a lot of homeowners with roofs before the market is saturated. I’m not being snarky and I realize it may work better in San Diego than in Buffalo but it works surprisingly well in FAR more of the country than the Chicken Littles would have you think. A $30k solar array was a big expense a decade ago when cars were less than that on average and gas was cheap. Now that gas is getting closer to its true cost and people seemingly happily spend closer to $50k for a fairly average vehicle, that $30k solar hasn’t risen much…If you own a house pretty much anywhere in the US, I can almost guarantee that its value itself has increased more than $30k over the last two years. $30k just isn’t that much money for many people anymore, especially if it can be financed at a low rate over a long time. Everybody and their brother seems to be able to swing the payment on a full size truck, none of which are anywhere near the $30k price point anymore, there always seems to be money for beer, weed, and tattoos, all that adds up too. Maybe it’s just about personal priorities, to each their own, some enjoy their sleeve tats, some enjoy not getting an electricity bill. (And for the record, I have neither tattoos nor solar, so no agenda here beyond trying to clear up some of the fake news on this site).

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            When I got a rooftop solar consultation last year the post-tax credit price was about $17k and they did offer me a lot of financing options at very little interest. The things that kept me from doing it were 1. My current electric bills only average about $110/month 2. I would still have to pay a $25/month connection fee to the utility company even with no usage 3. The salesman did a poor job explaining the maintenance/warranty situation.

            So I passed for now but if electricity prices go up or installation prices go down that could change.

          • 0 avatar
            WalterRohrl

            Yes, Solar doesn’t necessarily make sense for everyone and the connection fee doesn’t go away so to save $100 a month, maybe it doesn’t make sense, at least in the short term, depends on how long the payment term is I suppose.

            Not saying this is what you want or need to do, but if you were to consider an EV one day, then you’d also take into account that increased usage of course. You’d be able to figure out what your nightly or monthly electricity usage would be and then decide if it makes sense to offset that increased cost through daytime solar production. If you have time of day metering or excess usage penalties, then the solar would cancel those higher cost line items out first before nibbling away at the baseline cheapest night time usage charges. The first solar panel you install will save you more money than your last solar panel will, in other words, if that makes sense.

            I don’t have solar either, and to be fair about the argument of mine has generally been that I could take that money and invest it and likely would gain more than I’d save with solar, something nobody selling solar will ever calculate, i.e. the opportunity cost. If I do get it, it’ll have a lot to do with just making sense, not necessarily only a dollars and cents calculation. Every ray of sunshine that I can harvest to put into my car may mean one less day of some American soldier having to fight for oil somewhere. I can’t put that math into the equation but it exists.

        • 0 avatar
          WalterRohrl

          Of course you can buy a lot of $6 gas, it’s a choice. You’ll just get about half as much of it as last year when it was $3. Either car choice is valid, I’m not saying gasoline vehicles are completely obsolete however I’m not accepting the view that EVs are non-starters either that seems common here including to whom I responded to.

          Like I said they aren’t for everyone, you’re one of the “everyone”s that apparently only has one car in the family fleet. Lots of your neighbors likely have more than one that they could use and are worried about range or whatever when they drive across the country. The Model 3 (and other Teslas) are probably by far the BEST cars to take across the country as the recharging infrastructure is extremely developed along most major routes but just like any other vehicle may not work for every single use case.

          I apologize for the snark, I didn’t realize that it’s now something that TTAC frowns on and that the rest of the commenters (and authors) refrain from it as well, that’s a refreshing change and hopefully you will be calling out every instance of it from everyone else as well. In any case, it wasn’t directed at you personally if you took it as such.

          You are correct, they ARE gaining in popularity, as I said they won’t work for all of the couple hundred commenters here, but they seem to be working for more and more of the entire rest of the population every day. One day at a time…Not everyone shot their horse the day Karl Benz rolled his Patentwagen out of his shed either.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “I’m not accepting the view that EVs are non-starters”

            Certainly not. They have a lot of potential and a lot of momentum behind them.

            “that’s a refreshing change and hopefully you will be calling out every instance of it from everyone else as well.”

            It was unnecessary to single you out. I just thought you had a very good comment going until that point. Some folks on here never have anything worthwhile to say.

            Anyway, it doesn’t seem we are that far apart on things in the first place.

          • 0 avatar
            WalterRohrl

            “Anyway, it doesn’t seem we are that far apart on things in the first place.”

            No, I don’t think we are at all either.

            Different viewpoints and opinions are alright from anyone, but plain wrong facts, ignorance, and pushing some sort of agenda are not. That goes for commenters as well as some of the so-called “editors” on this site.

          • 0 avatar
            NigelShiftright

            “Of course you can buy a lot of $6 gas, it’s a choice. You’ll just get about half as much of it as last year when it was $3.”

            What’s more likely, at least for a few years to come, is that people will buy nearly as many gallons of $6 gas as they did of $3 gas, they’ll just buy lots less of other stuff. Which should work out okay for them once the price of $8 diesel gets folded into everything else they buy.

            “Not everyone shot their horse the day Karl Benz rolled his Patentwagen out of his shed either.”

            True, but then the Prussian government didn’t run around sterilizing mares. I’m more than happy to let everyone who wants an EV buy one, or several, all I ask is that the (CENSORED) politicians get their (CENSORED) thumb off the scales.

          • 0 avatar
            WalterRohrl

            “What’s more likely, at least for a few years to come, is that people will buy nearly as many gallons of $6 gas as they did of $3 gas, they’ll just buy lots less of other stuff. Which should work out okay for them once the price of $8 diesel gets folded into everything else they buy.”

            I was merely pointing out that the $6 gets you less gas than it did last year, exactly half…
            Could be though, it’s about time that the price of gas is closer to the actual cost of it. You didn’t think that it was free to let American soldiers die to “free Iraq’s oil” and to defend Kuwait and ensure Saudi can keep pumping etc? Or that there is no cost to the US when the Valdez leaked? I could go on but I think you get my point.

            “I’m more than happy to let everyone who wants an EV buy one, or several, all I ask is that the (CENSORED) politicians get their (CENSORED) thumb off the scales.”

            Fine with me. You’ll note (or maybe you didn’t notice) that Tesla has been without Federal tax credits for over a year now and they sell better than ever, shocker!. The Mach-E which was touted as the Model Y killer is now some $20k LESS expensive after credits and price changes and nowhere near as popular. Good EVs sell. Just like good regular cars sell. No federal thumbs on the scale needed. (Actually the Mach-E is very good, it should sell better, I believe it’s the dealers that are getting in the way. I’d rather pay more for a Tesla and be confident the company is getting the money than may a ridiculous markup on a Mach-E to finance the dealer’s scumbag kid’s boat and cocaine habit.).

            HOWEVER…A) That federal EV rebate wasn’t YOUR tax money. It was the tax money of whoever bought the car. Nobody got more money than they were going to pay in taxes, in other words they never got a refund that amounted to more than they were going to pay. Your tax dollars didn’t pay for anyone else’s credit, only theirs did and if they didn’t have enough of a tax obligation they didn’t get the whole thing.

            HOWEVER PART 2 – If you think there are no thumbs on the scale in regard to gasoline/diesel cars you are plain wrong. Oil companies reap some of the biggest tax benefits going, have the national military fighting for their product to be available, and are not charged for that at all. I’m with you on this one, remove ALL thumbs from the scale for ALL cars and the oil that powers them as well and let the market shake itself out. If you think gas prices are high now, they have a long way to go if you want only the actual user of the product to pay for all of the costs of that product. Bring it on. Some people will make different choices but that’s up to them.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @WalterRohrl – Prior to this huge jump in fuel prices, the Kia dealer my son works at has had one EV show up without a deposit on it and it sold immediately. The local Ford dealer had a high turnover rate on Mach E’s. Now, all are pre-sold. The Chevy lot had several EV’s collecting dust for the past few months but I suspected they were fleet units waiting for delivery. One of their salesman told me the spread the fleet units over their lot to make it look like they had something to sell.

        • 0 avatar
          WalterRohrl

          Yes, it’s not a big struggle to see that there is demand for EVs and not just because gas is pricey and other cars are scarce as well. North America is actually the laggard in EV takeup, the rest of the (developed) world is far ahead already as in many other things.

          There’s a reason Ford is threatening to fine and otherwise punish dealers who are/were hoping to sell their demo Lightnings with fat markups instead of hanging on to them to actually use them to, uh, “demo” the thing to potential buyers. But some here would have you believe there is zero demand for such a vehicle. Sure.

          I mean, I remember back when I was in grade school and thought girls were icky. Then I hit puberty and middle school and after actually experiencing a few of the things that the dudes I hung out with couldn’t deliver, well, my mind changed on the matter. But you have to be open minded to cross the school yard and strike up a conversation instead of just continuing to toss a ball back and forth with your buddy Chad or Ronny and just keep talking $^&* about the other kind…

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @WalterRohrl–I don’t know how much of an auto enthusiast EBFlex is because he has more of a political agenda and expresses little interest in vehicles. Even though I am currently not interested in buying an EV I want to know what is available and what the manufacturers are doing. I want to keep an open mind. My wife is interested in the Cadillac Lyriq and we will follow that to see how that vehicle does and if GM is able to make a go of it. The proposed price of the Lyriq seems competitive especially for a luxury suv/crossover.

        • 0 avatar
          WalterRohrl

          He isn’t an enthusiast, a real enthusiast can see the good in any vehicle no matter what it is and would approach it from its use case and purpose, not just for how it would work or not work for him alone and then attempt to extrapolate that viewpoint onto every other potential buyer.

          But he’s just responding to the red meat thrown out by some of the authors here who are also less than enthusiasts about cars and far more into stirring up political $%^&. I feel kind of sorry for those authors, I can’t imagine doing a job without having any passion whatsoever for the publicly stated purpose of the employer (presumably cars on this website). Hopefully they are at least very well paid, I doubt Tucker Carlson would be spewing his crap for less than the $30 million he takes home every year. Of course, he was first in line to be vaccinated too, can’t risk that fat paycheck, so…

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ He isn’t an enthusiast, a real enthusiast can see the good in any vehicle no matter what it is and would approach it from its use case and purpose, not just for how it would work or not work for him alone and then attempt to extrapolate that viewpoint onto every other potential buyer.”

            Imagine being this wrong.

            The problem with limbs like you, Jeff s, freedmike, Lou-mr is that you read something and your brain immediately jumps to all kinds of crazy conclusions and twists peoples words into something they’re not.

            I’ve explained the issue with EVs many many times over on this site. It’s perfectly clear and perfectly reasonable. I am all for LOGICAL solutions that offer numerous benefits to the consumer. Solutions that truly move the bar from the current technology.

            But pushing solutions that don’t work because of a political agenda, especially when the product is so vastly inferior is just stupid and I will call it out.

          • 0 avatar
            WalterRohrl

            Haha, yeah, just…no. People here have figured you out, most just won’t waste the time on you anymore. Buh-bye.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ People here have figured you out….”

            Oh I’m sure they have, but the truth is pretty easy to figure out.

            It just amazes me how much the truth bothers people like you, lou_mr, freedmike, Jeff s, mcs, etc. You people are so intolerant of a different point of view that you lash out and just attack people. It’s tragically hilarious.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “I’ve explained the issue with EVs many many times over on this site. It’s perfectly clear and perfectly reasonable.”

            No. Your “issue with EVs” involves a single use case which is not relevant to everyone and not the most important thing even to many people for whom it is relevant. This article is about consumers who have other use cases seeing the clear benefits of EVs.

            I own one BEV and one hybrid. I would gain absolutely nothing, and lose a lot of advantages, from replacing the BEV with something else. Even though I use the hybrid to take road trips—the use case you prattle on about for post after post—I am likely to replace it with a BEV as well. The other advantages of EVs outweigh a few slower recharges per year on the road for me; it’s that simple.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “No. Your “issue with EVs” involves a single use case which is not relevant to everyone and not the most important thing even to many people for whom it is relevant.”

            How is lack of a legitimate charging infrastructure a “single use case”?

            My concerns revolve around the $2k-$6k in grid improvements for each EV added to the fleet. The amount of money that is being spend to foced these inferior vanity products on us (which is why Xiden is doing nothing about gas prices).

            My concerns are much more broad than a single use case, but I know that won’t stop you from mistating my position.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            OK, that’s a new one, but taking it at face value…

            (1) If it is actually possible to engineer a major share shift to EVs across the world (like to the point where EVs are half or more of private cars), as regulators in China and the EU are trying their best to do, then the savings on disaster relief from fewer and less severe climate-exacerbated disasters will easily cover grid upgrades.

            BUT, since you believe in the face of insurance companies’ rapidly rising disaster losses that climate change is a hoax, I’ll also have to remind you that…

            (2) EV charging presents a major profit opportunity for utilities, who can charge a significant markup for power at public charging stations and still massively undercut gas. It’s likely that EV users themselves will fund much of the cost of upgrades by fueling their cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        If you still use your big truck when you need it it is worth keeping. Several large truck owners on Ford Authority stated that they ordered Mavericks as daily drivers and were keeping their full size trucks for when they needed them. I doubt full size 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton, and 1 ton trucks will go away more likely that those who use them in businesses, farms, and for hauling and towing will still have them but those who are buying them for show will be fewer. Nothing beats a full size truck or suv for capacity if you need that capacity.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @WalterRohrl – EBcluck is a troll. It isn’t worth your time to respond to him. Fords, EV’s, anything leftward politically, global warming, vaccines, masks, and covid are what he blathers on about. He hopes his posts are the equivalent of a wet fart in a crowded elevator. A reply to his nonsense rouses his micro-schmeckel.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Epic

            Thanks for proving my point kiddo.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou_BC–Agree those of us who really have a passion for cars, trucks, motorcycles, or any powered contraption with wheels come on this site and others like it to read the latest news or to get our fix on old vehicles we grew up with that are rare today. Growing up I could tell every make and model of car and specific years. When I learned to drive it it was on my grandparents farm on a 63 IH 1000 stepside pickup with a straight 6, 3 on the tree, manual choke 1 barrel Holley carb, and no radio (my nephew has that truck fully restored). During that same Summer I drove my brother’s 2 door 55 Buick Special hardtop with a Dynaflow and his new 67 yellow VW Beetle Convertible with a 4 speed manual. I could not wait to get my driver’s license and the driving school I went to had 67 Mustangs and Mercury Montegos with the bigger V8s. I always wondered why a driving school would have muscle like cars for beginning drivers but they were a blast to drive and neat looking. I was excited when I bought my first new car a buckskin colored 77 landau top Monte Carlo with swivel buckets, power windows and locks, rally wheels, cruise, and rear window defroster. Back in 77 that Monte was a luxury car now it would be considered standard equipment. I was proud of that car and I couldn’t polish it enough times to where I saw myself in its mirror like finish. I now go on old car sites like Rare Classic Cars to satisfy my fix for cars I grew up with.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    EVs now account for 4.6% of all passenger vehicles being sold in the U.S.

    4.6% is an important number.
    Also, what is the average transaction price of the EV’s registered?

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I found this interesting link about auto sales in the USA. It shows units per 1,000 people. https://www.energy.gov/eere/vehicles/fact-841-october-6-2014-vehicles-thousand-people-us-vs-other-world-regions.
    USA current national average for EV’s: 3.08/1,000.
    Compare that to the infancy of the gasoline powered automobile:1909:3.45/1,000.

  • avatar
    Greg Hamilton

    No more Chinese Teslas for you. It looks like China is transitioning to a war economy:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MumZO_UBQ8

    Good luck to everyone!

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Went for another bicycle ride today (more cycling miles than ICE miles this week) and stopped by the sketchy old part of the greenway where the homeless guys hang out to get some investment advice.

    Then I figured I’d stop by TTAC to get some world-class advice on vehicle purchase decisions.

    I’m pretty much all set now!

    • 0 avatar
      redgolf

      ToolGuy – I can’t stop laughing here at 4:30 am It’s gonna be a good day! Do you have those investors web sites? They must be using the solar grid! ;-)

  • avatar
    dartman

    I bought a 7.5kw solar system in 2015 for $15k (after 30% tax credit) I was averaging $225/mo for electricity, but haven’t paid a dime in 7 years in sunny NorCal. The system has paid for itself and I am now money in the bank. I plan to wait until the market cools and buy a F150 Lightning with home battery back-up option. Tesla or LG batteries or currently selling installed here for $16k for a 13.5kw battery so that’s a no brainer. Life is good.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      It is great that you have the solar system that should work well for you when you have an EV truck. I am having a 220 installed in the garage of my new home so that I at least have the option for EV charging. They will not allow me to have solar panels now but if that changes in the future I will definitely consider it especially in Arizona.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Who is “they”? Your HOA? Check state law. In many states solar panels are covered based on user interest, not HOA.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @Dave M.–It is the HOA that will not allow the solar panels but that could change. I am downsizing from a 3,300 square feet 3 car garage home to a 1 story condo attached on one end with a 2 car garage and about 1,650 square feet in Arizona in the high desert. My wife and I want the hot and dry climate. There is enough sunshine there that it would easily produce electricity. I am putting 220 in the garage for an EV. You are correct the State of Arizona covers solar panels but I think it has more to do with the tile roof for the HOA.

  • avatar
    BSttac

    Wow a whole 5% of the market is EVs…thats like everyone…

    • 0 avatar
      WalterRohrl

      There isn’t a non-EV manufacturer in the world that wouldn’t kill for the 5% more market share that they are currently losing to EVs according to your data. 5% is huge if true, I actually believe it’s a bit lower.

      In any case 5% is only half of 10%, not a big next step to achieve, then push a little more to 25%, then half, and then who knows.

      And I’m the one that gets called out for snark. Ha!

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “ And I’m the one that gets called out for snark. Ha!”

        As you should

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “ In any case 5% is only half of 10%, not a big next step to achieve, then push a little more to 25%, then half, and then who knows.”

        Thank you for showing everyone that you have no idea how scaling works in business. Tell me, is it easier to go from one unit sold to two units sold or 500,000 to 750,000?

  • avatar
    WalterRohrl

    There isn’t a non-EV manufacturer in the world that wouldn’t kill for the 5% more market share that they are currently losing to EVs according to your data. 5% is huge if true, I actually believe it’s a bit lower.

    In any case 5% is only half of 10%, not a big next step to achieve, then push a little more to 25%, then half, and then who knows.

    And I’m the one that gets called out for snark. Ha!

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    You might be able to cheat the government for a while by purchasing an EV, but rest assured, even if you have an EV and charge from your own solar panels, the government will impose per-mile taxes so confiscatory that you will end up paying more than an ICE car at $6 a gallon.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      If liberals keep running this country into the ground that will absolutely happen. They create crisis so they can develop new revenue streams.

      Look at how much money has been spent on the global warming hoax? Easily into the hundreds of trillions over the decades. Meanwhile, those disgustingly hypocritical liberals are the biggest threat to the planet right now. And they care so much about the planet, they flew the Ukraine aid bill to South Korea so Xiden could sign it. Not very green. I guess they don’t have email or the internet in South Korea.

      $40 billion for a corrupt government while we can’t put formula on our shelves and the clown won’t lower gas prices.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @Master Baiter–Ohio charges about $200 per year for EVs and $100 for hybrids with other states like Kentucky proposing similar legislation. Reduction in fuel tax revenue is hurting many states road funds. I don’t mind paying something for upkeep of the roads. The roads where I live are for the most part good but the growth in population in NKY makes it hard to keep up with widening of roads and building of new roads especially with Amazon having a major distribution hub in NKY and many people moving from Ohio to Kentucky to get more home for the money and lower taxes. Boone County where I live is the fastest growing county in Kentucky.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      My state imposes a registration surcharge for EVs that is quite a bit more than the gas tax savings I realize from driving an EV. (Fortunately, the savings in raw fuel cost before tax easily cover the difference.)

      But you conservatives can’t make up your mind about what the government is doing. Are they pricing owners out of ICEVs to force a shift to EVs, or are they bilking owners of EVs to make sure they won’t lose revenue? It can be one or the other but not both, and it seems like you all pivot to whichever allows you to criticize particular governments in the moment.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “ But you conservatives can’t make up your mind about what the government is doing. Are they pricing owners out of ICEVs to force a shift to EVs, or are they bilking owners of EVs to make sure they won’t lose revenue?”

        Just going to point out that nobody has ever asserted that the government is “bilking” owners of EVs. No one.

        Conservatives have always advocated for people that use the road should be charged. People that bike in public roads should be charged. EVs should be charged (which they are-somewhat).

        But the government is also very much able to, through legislation, make it untenable for ICE ownership. We are seeing that now with the government not doing anything about gas prices. Libs want this inflation, they want high prices, and they want expensive gas. Because all they care about is ensuring their pockets get full. Liberals and democrats have never been for the people. They hate people, especially the lower classes.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          “Conservatives have always advocated for people that use the road should be charged. ”

          I don’t know about that. I’d say every politician has had their head in a moist, dark place for decades on the gas tax issue.

          I can only speak for my state. California’s gas tax is a joke, not so much for the money that’s taken, but from the lack of clarity on how the money is re-deployed. The state’s roads are mostly C-D quality, despite the state collecting about $7.5 billion annually from gas taxes. No numbers available that I could find noting what’s spent on road/bridge/dam repairs in the state.

          Maybe I should file a FOIA request to find out where the money went.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Here’s a link to what each state has taken in from gas tax revenue:

            https://www.taxpolicycenter.org/statistics/motor-fuel-tax-revenue

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @dal20402–EB troll just came out from under the bridge. The extra tax has more to do with lost revenue from the gas tax. Don’t like additional taxes myself but I fully understand it and as a user of the public roads I understand I have to pay for their upkeep. Those who revert to name calling especially when they do not know you are immature and belong on the school yard instead of a serious discussion. Cannot take anyone serious when they resort to name calling.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “Those who revert to name calling especially when they do not know you are immature and belong on the school yard instead of a serious discussion. Cannot take anyone serious when they resort to name calling.”

          Also Jeff S:

          “EB troll just came out from under the bridge.”

          Massive hypocrisy in the same posty. That’s pretty good, even for you. Not to mention the fact that you can’t refute anything I said.

          Excellent job dude.

  • avatar
    raynla

    Wait…I thought Mary led Joe?

  • avatar
    redgolf

    Well, I’m just glad I’m retired, I rack up only 7 K miles/year and that includes numerous joy rides ( without the Mrs. of course ) to Best Buy, the money I save on gas affords me to overload my cart with new electronics so I can in turn afford to overload my electric bill!

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Congratulations on retirement I just retired the end of last year and I don’t drive as much either which affords me and the wife a filet mignon, with a nice side dish and a nice bottle of red wine once a week which I last paid $25 per pound for the filets but combined we eat just under a pound. Nice to be able to shop when others are working much less crowded.

  • avatar
    AK

    I have zero interest in owning an EV because EV manufacturers have zero interest in building a car that would appeal to me.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • wjtinfwb: BMW stylists are scribbling furiously right now, I expect to see the Edsel nose grafted onto the next...
  • Jeff S: @jhefner–The Rambler American was introduced in 1958 and its success led to Ford, GM, and Chevy...
  • Nick: I’d still love an Edsel Bermuda wagon.
  • dal20402: The average CUV puts the driver, particularly a shorter driver, at close to standing height. In a sedan the...
  • DenverMike: Hell yeah they’re awesome. In a Perfect World I’d have a vehicle from every, OK multiple segments, except...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber