By on April 6, 2022

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

To say the first quarter of 2022 was a strange period for car sales would be to sorely understate the situation, akin to saying Vesuvius just barely covered Pompeii. Toyota kept its crown in America, models long out of production recorded sales, and GM beat Ford over the head in trucks.

Wait, what?

There’s no hiding the fact that just about every dealer has been severely impacted by the chip shortage, with plenty of room for tumbleweeds to blow around their empty lots. It’s certainly had the effect of creating a tremendously short turn time, one in which most rigs are sold very shortly after they roll off the truck, if not long before. Uneven production and delivery schedules have created some strange sales numbers, particularly in the red hot (and profitable) truck market.

See? While there’s no change in the overall pecking order for full-size pickups, take a gander at the vanishing delta between perennial top dog Ford and its competitors. Those of you who passed basic math can take a moment to sum up the total for GM’s duo versus the Blue Oval. For everyone else, we’ll tell you that Silverado/Sierra was 13,000ish units adrift of F-Series this time last year – the final quarter before everything hit the fan and production turned all topsy turvy timey wimey. In the bizarro world in which we currently find ourselves, they now outpace the king by about 35,000 units combined. Even if that has happened in the past, it’s always notable, kids.

Here’s a fun fact about truck sales numbers: Ford and Ram conveniently roll all its full-size pickups (1/2 ton and 3/4+ ton) into one report. GM chooses to break them down into Light Duty and Heavy Duty numbers for Silverado and Sierra, revealing that Heavy Duty trucks from Chevy and GMC comprised about one-third of sales for the S&S twins last quarter. In a headache-inducing bout of corporate acronyms, GM chooses to call its biggest trucks (those 4500+ Series chassis cab brutes) medium-duty pickups. The mind reels.

Other tidbits which can be parsed from this data include a robust showing for the new Frontier. We’re apt to compare its success against the achievements of its competitors in Q1 rather than blindly parroting the news that it doubled sales volume versus this same time in ‘21; remember, that was a transition year for the model. It’s also worth noting that the Maverick is handily outselling the Ranger so far in 2021.

Any other ruminations on these numbers from the peanut gallery? Sound off in the comments.

[Image: Ford]

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68 Comments on “Pickup Shake-Up: Supply Chain Headaches Stir the Pot...”


  • avatar
    redapple

    I m still shaking my head re: how FUGKLY the Silverado is. And the HD variants will scare little kids they re so bad. But, what do i know. I liked my Dynasty.

    I rented a Tacoma 2 weeks back in DTW. Whoa. How do people buy these? BRUTAL ride. 11/10 ths worse than a Ranger. And my ankles were 4 ” below my bum. Just like my 79 Camaro. Brutal.

    Market should soften with $4 gas. Fewer PIG ups on the road is welcomed.

    Ever notice, even when driving 7 mpg over the speed limit, there is usually a PIG on your a$$?

    PS- EBFlex is right 85% + of the time.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      redapple-
      Sounds like you and EBFlex has something going on the rest of fail to see-or understand.
      OR- are pulling a “politician move” and by repeating things enough people will believe it.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “Sounds like you and EBFlex has something going on the rest of fail to see-or understand.”

        It’s called the truth and common sense.

        That’s what many here fail to see, understand, or comprehend.

        • 0 avatar
          CKNSLS Sierra SLT

          Yea. You think your above the rest of us. Well.. congrats you earned my ” ignore button” even if this site doesn’t have one!

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ Yea. You think your above the rest of us.”

            Not in the least.

            Also, are you going to answer my question regarding your false question of: “What dealer or dealer support company do you work for?”

            I just fail to understand how stating that not all dealers participate in the practice ADMs and that there is new inventory on lots somehow makes me an employee of a dealer.

    • 0 avatar

      What a disgrace!

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It would take a lot more than 4 to $7 gas to impact the fullsize truck market. Really there’s no replacement. Midsize have about the same MPG, or worse depending on model or use.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        For those who need and use full size pickups true but for many who buy them just as a status symbol or to make a statement higher gas prices along with higher MSRPs will effect sales especially if prices get so high that many will not qualify for the loans. For those you really need trucks this could be good because prices could stabilize. Many who buy large trucks don’t tow or haul heavy loads and could use a smaller truck or crossover if they had to. People might want a large vehicle but they don’t need one especially if they cannot afford to buy one and keep it up. The same is true for anything I might want a million dollar house but I might only be able to barely afford a 250k or 300k home.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      “Ever notice, even when driving 7 mpg over the speed limit…”

      Only when I am doing the Kessel Run in under 12 Parsecs.

      Seriously, speed limits are measured in gallons now?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Silverado is ugly (agreed), but you liked your Dodge Dy-nasty thirty years ago?

  • avatar
    ajla

    This is one reason I think automakers won’t be able to informally(?) collude to keep supply low once more chips are available. Ford puts a lot of pride on the F-Series being the best selling vehicle for the last 40 years, are they really willing to give that up to Ram if Stellantis lunges for it?

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      ajla-
      I would agree for some on here to be of the opinion that production is constrained by choice is nonsensical. While I can see down the road incentives for waiting and online ordering-or paying somewhat more for a truck in a dealers inventory, there is no way Fords F-150s are down this much by choice-and succeeding the sales crown to the GM twins last quarter. Some Mavericks sales will be lost to both the Frontier and Santa Cruz (even tho not direct completion) and some F-150s sales will be lost to other full size trucks for those who get tired of the wait.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Would agree otherwise on the Maverick but the Santa Cruz is in just as short of supply and its price is higher. I think of Hyundai starts making their own chips that they will gain more market share but I doubt the Santa Cruz will surpass the Maverick in sales unless they come up with a lower base trim and price. Having a hybrid for a base engine especially with 42 mpgs in city and about 33 highway is a huge sales advantage for Maverick for those who don’t need AWD. Even the turbo 4 AWD Maverick is still very economical.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          By all accounts the Mav should be outselling the SC about 4/1 but its current pace is only 2/1 due to the near non-availablity of the Mav. Several potential Mav owners have given up and bought a SC because, while they too are in short supply you can actually find one occasionally.

          Ford’s price advantage really only applies to very bottom and top of end of the range. In the meat of the trim ranges both vehicles are identical in cost. It just happens that low end also gives Ford the MPG win with the hybrid. Hyundai needs to offer a hybrid SC like yesterday.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “Ford puts a lot of pride on the F-Series being the best selling vehicle”

      The F-Series is not a vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The Silverado is just as much a “series’ of pickup classes (or “not a vehicle”). It’s true the F-150 was on a separate platform entirely from ’96 to ’16, but today they’re all the same platform/chassis (shared).

        Currently F-150 bodies/sheet-metal, are better differentiated from bigger F-series, compared to Ram and GM pickup “series”, but they’re all the same technically.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          But the Silverado is a real truck. You can go to the dealer and buy a Chevrolet Silverado. There are parts lists for Silverados.

          You can’t buy a 2022 Ford F-Series. There isn’t a parts list for a 2022 Ford F-Series.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            That’s genius but you still have to specify which in the Silverado series you want or want parts for. Or they’ll look at you like you’re dumb (which they’ll probably do anyway):

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “That’s genius but you still have to specify which in the Silverado series you want or want parts for.”

            Correct. Similar to your laughable 3-Series analogy.

            The 3-Series is a real vehicle. You have to specify the sub model. But it’s accurate to say you drive a Silverado or a 3-Series.

            The Silverado is a vehicle. The F-Series is not.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Even if it’s not called one, the Silverado is a series.

            Instead of stating “…the BMW 318, 325, 330, etc…”, they’re simply referred to as “3-series”. It saves a bunch of words, same as 5-series, and others, including S-class, C-class and more.

            Just the same you’ll sound stupid at the BMW dealer asking to see a 3-series.

        • 0 avatar
          etrillion

          besides Silverado/Sierra 1500s having different bodies from each other, and Silverado/Sierra HDs having different bodies from each other, the 1500s are also completely different vehicles than the HDs. GM says (outside of the roof) the 1500s and HDs share no body panels or sheetmetal at all, so they are now better differentiated from one another than Ford F150 and Super Duty models.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        A truck is a type of vehicle just as an automobile is a type of vehicle. A truck is not an automobile even though crew cab short bed pickups along with crossovers and suvs have replaced most 4 door sedans. The F series is the best selling truck and best selling vehicle in the USA.

        • 0 avatar
          etrillion

          Definition of automobile
          noun
          a passenger vehicle designed for operation on ordinary roads and typically having four wheels and a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine… I would say a truck fits that

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        “The F-Series is not a vehicle.”

        Source?

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          To him the BMW 3-series isn’t a vehicle either. Although all of the 3-series models are counted in one total.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            {“To him the BMW 3-series isn’t a vehicle either. Although all of the 3-series models are counted in one total.”

            You couldn’t have come up with a less applicable analogy than you did. Congrats.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          ““The F-Series is not a vehicle.”

          Source?”

          Ford.com

          Under trucks and vans I don’t see any “2022 F-Series”

          Every dealer I go to cannot quote me a price for a 2022 Ford F-Series, the parts department can’t get me parts for a 2022 Ford F-Series, and my insurance company cannot give me a quote for a 2022 Ford F-Series.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @ajla – agreed. If one company gains a production advantage, they will flood the market to gain market share.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Also you should put the Santa Cruz in the chart just to annoy Hyundai’s marketing team.

    And, super bold prediction: the Maverick’ volume by 2024 will be very close to the Tacoma for the best-selling nonlarge thing with a bed.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Beat me to it about the Santa Cruz.

      Hyundai says it’s not a truck, but where then does it fit? SUVs?

      Incidentally, the Santa Cruz moved 8400 units YTD 2022. I know for sure that it’s supply-constrained. My local dealer’s allocation of 80 Hyundais for mid-April contained 0 Santa Cruz’s, which is one reason I ended up with a Santa Fe (from another dealer, no less).

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I suspect Ford could have easily tripled the number of Maverick sales if they’d had the production capacity. It seems like a compelling package at a very reasonable price. I’m intrigued by it, but I’ll never buy a vehicle that I can’t test drive, and there are effectively none in stock.

    Absent from this list is the Hyundai Santa Cruz, but I bet Hyundai got more than a few “conquest sales” from people who liked the concept of the Maverick but couldn’t find one to buy.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      YTD sales, 2022:

      Maverick = 19245
      Santa Cruz = 8400

      https://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2022-us-vehicle-sales-figures-by-model/

      Neither mfr can build them fast enough, so I’m not sure these numbers reflect actual demand.

      I ended up with a Santa Fe last month because I couldn’t get a Santa Cruz.

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        Well, at least “Santa” came to your house one way or another.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Agree demand is much higher than actual supply for both the Santa Cruz and the Maverick. I was getting tired of waiting for my Maverick and looked at the Santa Cruz but the waiting for it is the same as the Maverick so I decided to wait for the Maverick. For most people who want a truck but don’t really need a full size or mid size the Maverick and Santa Fe are a perfect fit and both are low enough in height to easily get in and out and reach in the bed. That is the main reason I wanted a smaller truck especially with my wife who has physical disabilities that make it hard for her to get in higher vehicles even with running boards. She has to be able to get in and out and at the same time I want and need a open bed to haul things. My 99 S-10 was low enough for her to get in and out of but my 4 x 4 Isuzu and the Ranger were too high. It is also harder for me as well especially to reach in the bed of most trucks especially as I have gotten older.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        22,800 SC have left the factory since it went on sale which was several months before the Mav.

        And yes several on the SC forums have switched teams after giving up on receiving their Mav.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “I suspect Ford could have easily tripled the number of Maverick sales if they’d had the production capacity.”

      Production capacity is not an issue. It’s made at a plant that had a capacity of 300k-350K units a year when it was producing the Fusion and it’s rebadges.

      The problem is, Ford makes hardly any money on the Escape pickup. They make FAR more on virtually everything else in their portfolio. So why waste chips on a cheap “truck” with no margin when they can build other vehicles where they make thousands?

      • 0 avatar
        Oberkanone

        300,000 production capacity at Hermosillo Stamping and Assembly.
        Production capacity is an issue. Hermosillo is only plant to build Maverick and only plant to build Bronco Scout. 124,918 Bronco Scout built in 2021.
        Ford corporate has stated the Transit Connect will be assembled at Hermosillo by 2023. Currently it’s imported. Perhaps Ford will change plans on Transit Connect with popularity of Maverick. Not easy to change these types of plans in short amount of time.
        How do you reach the conclusion that production capacity is not an issue? Where would Ford add production of Maverick?

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          You two are kind of saying the same thing. Ford has been planning the Maverick for quite a while, just as they have been planning out the Transit Connect production location for quite a while. If Ford *wanted* to build 250k Mavericks per year, it could have arranged it that way. As a low-margin truck, it was probably given a low priority on purpose.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “ How do you reach the conclusion that production capacity is not an issue? Where would Ford add production of Maverick?”

          Because Ford isn’t running that plant at full capacity. Ford has the ability to ramp production of the Escape pickup at that plant easily. They CHOOSE not to because there’s not much to be gained. In many ways, the Escape pickup is a loss leader (although not quite because Ford still makes a very little amount of money in it). Ford isn’t going to throw away $10k+ in profit on an F150 so they can make $500 on an Escape pickup.

          So they don’t allocate chips to Hermosillo and instead divert them to high margin products. But the plant has the ability to produce fa more than it is right now.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            It is more than chip shortages. There is a shortage of spray in bed materials, bed inserts, tires, foam for seats, and components bought from suppliers. At this point Ford would rather make more Mavericks because of those who have become irate over waiting for their Maverick to be built and Ford dealers demanding more Mavericks. Not everyone who buys or wants a Maverick will buy an F-150 and many of the sales are conquest sales from Honda and Toyota. The price and the hybrid are what is attracting many buyers to the Maverick especially Honda Civic buyers with the utility of a pickup and the mpgs of a compact car. The interior room in the Maverick especially the rear seat and headroom are better than a Ranger, Colorado, and Tacoma. Call it what you want an Escape pickup but it is the right vehicle at the right price and it meets the needs of most people who want a little more utility than a sedan. I don’t care if the Maverick is based on an Escape platform as long as it is priced right and it meets most of my needs. I didn’t order a Maverick to impress anyone I ordered it because it was an affordable and practical vehicle and it checked most of the boxes for what I wanted in a vehicle. If you haven’t bothered to look at a Maverick then you don’t know. I was skeptical at first but I started looking closer at one and did some research. Makes a perfect vehicle for retired people like me who want a truck but in a smaller package. Apparently others agree or it would not be selling as well as it is. Anyway Ford is selling more of the XLT and Lariat trims than the base XL so Ford is making plenty of money on the Maverick and the costs to develop it were much lower than the F150 especially since it shares a platform with the Escape and Bronco Sport and shares many components.

          • 0 avatar
            Dave M.

            Escape pickup. You just can’t quit playing the class clown, can you?

            Anyway, I’m certain if they had the resources available Ford would have cranked up Maverick production to sate at least 80% of the waitlist. The fact that they won’t even take anymore hybrid reservations tells me it’s a desperate situation for them. I also disagree with Ford only making $500 on the Maverick. Perhaps that’s true of the base model, but the vast majority of their manufacturing mix was XLT and Lariat models, where a lot more profit is built in.

            I do think the jovial celebrations last week in Vegas at the NADA lovefest is going to bite them in the ass at some point in time. There is a groundswell ill feelings building by people who need mid- and lower-trim cars and trucks (most likely for work or economical reasons). To be told “X is not available at this time and the manufacturer does not know when production will start again”, while they’re cranking out $60-80k vehicles to the highest bidder is VERY short-sighted.

          • 0 avatar
            Oberkanone

            Where is your data?
            Escape SUV built at Louisville Assembly. There is not an Escape badged pickup.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            The Maverick shares a platform and mechanicals with the Escape and Bronco Sport. The Bronco Sport is also built at Hermosillo. Since the Bronco Sport is also an in-demand vehicle, that may explain some of the Maverick’s production issues.

          • 0 avatar
            tomLU86

            Unless one works for Ford, one cannot know how many Mavericks or Broncos or whatever the plant can make.

            I’ll grant that the plant’s capacity is 300k per year. This means they can assembly 300k vehicles total.

            If the plant has an automated (robotic) body shop (it probably does, but perhaps it does not), the capacity to build bodies for a particular vehicle is the constraint. One cannot just “turn the knob” or “add capacity” to an automated body shop. It is what it is. If you want more, you need to build ANOTHER body shop, or a newer bigger one. They are very expensive to build. If the vehicle sales fall short, you have just paid tens of millions more than you had to. To minimize the capital cost per unit, you need to determine the volume you want, and optimize the shop for that volume.

            So, if Ford planned on 100k Mavericks, 100k Broncos, and 100k Escapes, those are your 300k units. If Ford had excess Escape capacity elsewhere, they might decide, “hey, we’ll shift 50k units to our surplus plant, and build a new, “lean” body shop for up to 75k Transit vans.

            That doesn’t mean Ford can now build 325k vehicles, or 375k if they need those 100k Escapes. Their general assembly area, where the painted bodies (and Paint is another bottleneck) get carpets and seats and mufflers, etc, installed by human workers can still only run 300k max. So Ford has to allocate between the products.

            The chain is only as good as the weakest link. Ford can add more hours and have the plant run 6/24, and that’s it.

            The automakers do an excellent job of focusing our attention on ‘features’ like direct injection, heated steering wheels, EPA ratings, horsepower, looks, etc. No one really wondered about how they were built, unless they got a lemon, until COVID and now the Ukraine introduced “Supply Chain” to the vocabulary and the dealer lots became quite empty and cars have become much costlier than they were.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “Anyway, I’m certain if they had the resources available Ford would have cranked up Maverick production to sate at least 80% of the waitlist. The fact that they won’t even take anymore hybrid reservations tells me it’s a desperate situation for them. I also disagree with Ford only making $500 on the Maverick. Perhaps that’s true of the base model, but the vast majority of their manufacturing mix was XLT and Lariat models, where a lot more profit is built in.”

            Ford does have the resources available. They could have built all kinds of Escape pickups to satisfy demand. But then what would have been cut? F-150? The boxy version of the Escape? The Escape itself?

            And yes the margin is quite low on the Escape pickup. A friend of mine was looking to buy one for an undercover police vehicle and a local dealer was willing to sell it to him at invoice….which was $500 below MSRP.

  • avatar
    1500cc

    As mentioned in the article, the GM twins outsell Ford more often than not, so this isn’t that surprising. And if you narrow it down to just half-tons, Silverado alone would often outsell F-150, due to Ford deriving a greater percentage of their “F-Series” sales from the heavy-duty version.

    If I was GM, I’d divert enough Sierra production to Silverados to enable it to take the overall sales crown. It’d at least be a little solace for losing the overall sales leadership to Toyota in these oddball years.

    It’s interesting that Oshawa is producing Chevrolet trucks only (no GMC). The addition a full plant’s worth of Silverados might be enough to overtake Ford if they can keep it running full steam (assuming the GMC share doesn’t increase in other plants to compensate).

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    The “who sells the most pickups” debate surfaces once again. Why can’t GM combine sales to beat Ford? That answer was asked years ago, General Motors answered that question. “We” legally can’t combine Chevrolet Silverado sales with that of GMC Sierra to claim #1 sales.

    The other part of this debate is what is combined under each “brand” tally. I doubt that Matthew Guy is correct. My understanding is that that all 3 truck makers combine full-sized pickup trucks that come factory with a box under one total. Ford and Ram make 350/3500 and larger chassis cab trucks. Those count separately. GM walked away from that market and is now trying to regain lost ground in the commercial chassis/cab market.
    I did read that Ford and Ram sales percentages are similar with a high volume of HD trucks. Chevy in the USA often outsold Ford when comparing 1/2 ton to 1/2 ton. HD’s on the other hand has always been in Ford’s favour IIRC 70% to Chevy’s 30%.
    In Canada the Sierra usually outsells the Silverado. In the USA the Sierra barely moves any volume.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Same in Mexico. The Sierra always outsells the Silverado.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “ My understanding is that that all 3 truck makers combine full-sized pickup trucks that come factory with a box under one total. Ford and Ram make 350/3500 and larger chassis cab trucks.”

      Unsurprisingly, you’d be wrong.

      The F Series consists of the f150-f450

      GM trucks are 1500-3500

      Ram I’m not sure

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Why is it so hard to understand? If it’s fullsize, has a pickup bed, same brand, one total. Write it down.

        Some brands will break down the classes, or you can research it yourself, off registrations, JDPowers, etc.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Denver – Yup. Ford counts any full-sized pickup with a box as a F Series pickup. Ram and Chevy do the same. What confuses the drooling troll boys is commercial chassis cab trucks. They count separate.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Ford only counts the F-450 Pickup in those LD pickup numbers since it is technically a class 3 truck and is more like a F-350HD than the F-450 Cab & Chassis which is legally a class 4 truck. That is done to skirt licensing laws in some states.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Rolling 1/2 ton and 3/4+ ton pickup sales into one total, has always been the case, including GMs. Of course GM has been trying to break the F-series record for 40+ years with the Silverado.

    Killing them. Instead GM should ask themselves why their 3/4 ton (and up) pickups don’t have relevance, especially in the commercial arena. Hint: the IsuzuMax, CV-joint IFS, etc.

    But if they don’t have a pickup bed, they don’t count as “pickups” (over one ton)

  • avatar

    I think there is some price fixing in the auto world, but there are still enough companies involved in the US market that eventually someone tries to hit volume by undercutting someone else. It sometime takes a while but it always happens.

  • avatar

    I’m curious if Ranger sales are getting hit by Maverick or supply chain. They seem to have a similar dip as the F150 so maybe supply chain, be interesting to see that play out.
    Fun info, last night while cleaning a bin of paperwork I found some dealer quotes I had gotten for a new half-ton (also a quote for 3/4ton) around 2017. You could easily buy a crew cab 4×4 in a lower trim or mid trim for 33-36k at that time. 5 years later your at least 45K more like 50k. Even with the current inflation craziness that’s double the rate of inflation. At this point the only truck I could afford new may be a Maverick.

  • avatar
    KOKing

    All I can say is just observing things on the roads around here that:
    – I live in the heart of Hyundai/Kia corporate, and I’ve seen 1 Santa Cruz.
    – There are a f-ton of new Frontiers.
    – Maverick numbers are growing but they’re all one color: Blue.
    – Doesn’t the R1T count as a pickemup truck? Its numbers are growing, too (though again I live in Rivian corporate territory)

  • avatar
    RHD

    85% may be a correct statistic. The other 15% of the time he is posting on TTAC.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Technically pickups are considered a truck and a truck is different than an automobile but many today would consider crew cab pickups with short beds automobiles with a balcony attached instead of a trunk. The crew cab pickup is basically today’s version of the 70s land yacht.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @tomLU86–Agree Ford initially thought they would sell 100k Mavericks and that is the main reason for sharing the same plant with the Bronco Sport. EB Flex is just focusing on the chip shortage and allocating more chips to the F150 but there are other shortages as I mentioned previously of components not shared with the F150. When I ordered my Maverick last July there was already a shortage of certain components and the dealer told me that ordering some of the features I wanted would delay the production of my Maverick further. After the Bronco delays and upset customers Ford does not want to incur further wrath of Maverick customers but that has happened anyway but Ford is not deliberately constraining the Maverick. I believe Ford realizes a Maverick customer as I am will not be buying an F150 and a bate and switch tactic will only alienate Maverick customers and send them to another brand. A Maverick is not cross shopped with an F150 but it could be cross shopped with a Ranger, Colorado, Tacoma, Frontier, and especially with the Santa Fe. For me it was between the Maverick and the Santa Fe because I wanted something smaller and not as tall. There are a number of Civic and Corolla owners that have bought Mavericks. Trying to put most buyers of the Maverick into potential buyers of F150s is similar to in the 60s putting most Falcon buyers into potential Galaxie buyers especially those who only wanted compact cars.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      So Ford can come up with spray in bed material for the F-150 but not the Escape pickup and that’s why they are unable to build them.

      That makes no sense. It all comes down to money. Ford makes very little money on the Escape pickup. Rather than allocate chips to a low margin vehicle, they allocate them to high margin vehicles. Ford doesn’t give two sh*ts about Escape pickup orders. They don’t care about Ranger SUV owners either. They know they will sell whatever they make. They are not going to lose money because some guy can’t get his fake little truck. They don’t care.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Spray in bed liners are limited as well on the F-150s and as for fake little truck that is your opinion. A truck is not based on size but on function. The Maverick has an open bed and with the tailgate down it the bed is at least 6 feet and it can tow up to 4,000 lbs. Most of the global trucks are smaller than the US. You are definitely biased and do not look at all the facts before making a judgement. Your anti Ford biased clouds any objectivity.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Lol…if you eliminate the normal Mustang and just count the Mach E…the Mustang still outsold the Camaro

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    And the Challenger outsold the Camaro. If I were picking from the 3 I would go with the Challenger with a bigger trunk and a roomier rear seat. Always liked the looks of the original 70 1/2 Challenger.

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Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber