By on March 21, 2022

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, LH front view - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsRemember, not many years ago, when American car shoppers could choose among dozens of new Detroit sedans? For the 2006 model year alone, General Motors offered 12 different four-door sedans, and that’s ignoring sub-models plus the sedans bearing the badges of (GM-owned) Saab and Suzuki. Today, there are three new GM sedans available here, and both of the Cadillacs are built on the same platform as the Camaro. The Buick Division got out of the US-market sedan game when the final 2020 Regal rolled off Opel’s line in Rüsselsheim, but the very last proper full-sized Buick sedan was Hamtramck’s own Lucerne. I found this Northstar-equipped first-year Lucurne in a Colorado Springs yard last month.

Apparently because all the cool place names in Spain and Italy had been taken for other car models, Buick selected a Swiss city for this car’s namesake. The closest relative of the Lucerne was the Cadillac DTS.

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, Northstar engine - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsNot only was the Lucerne the last of the big Buick sedans, it was one of the very last GM vehicles to get the Northstar V8 engine. This one was rated at 275 horsepower.

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, Northstar engine - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe Northstar was a smooth and powerful DOHC engine, high-tech stuff when it debuted in the 1993 Cadillac Allanté, but it proved nearly impossible to do a head gasket job on one. The Northstar was standard equipment in the top-trim-level CXS and optional in the mid-grade CXL for 2006. Lesser Lucernes got the good old “gallon” Buick 3.8-liter V6, a pushrod engine with a complex ancestry stretching back to the early 1960s and rated at 197 horses in the ’06 Lucerne. For the 2009-2011 model years, the El Cheapo engine in the Lucerne became the 3.9-liter LZ9 V6 (still a pushrod engine but making a respectable 227 horsepower). All Lucernes had four-speed automatic transmissions, period.


It’s a safe bet that today’s Junkyard Find met its fate due to a failed head gasket. As we’ve learned with Northstars in the 24 Hours of Lemons, Head Gasket In a Can™ doesn’t work so well under racing conditions.

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe CXS interior would have felt comfortingly familiar to lifelong Buick buyers who still remembered their ’76 Electras and ’79 LeSabres with great fondness.

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsIn a nod to Lucerne owners’ grandchildren bearing iPods and Zunes, the ’06 Lucerne CXS came with an eight-speaker sound system with an AUX input jack. As someone who regularly scours junkyards for AUX-equipped factory head units to use in car-parts boomboxes, I can tell you that very few vehicles had such jacks prior to the late-2000s smartphone boom (though you could buy Mitsubishis in the middle 1990s with 3.5mm stereo input jacks, because of the minidisc craze in Japan at the time).

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, Hamtramck build sticker - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsIf you want to be really picky about it, the last true octogenarian-grade big Buick was the 1996 Roadmaster, because the 1949 Buick had rear-wheel-drive and that’s that. At least the ’49 Roadmaster, the ’96 Roadmaster, and the ’06 Lucerne were all built in Michigan (albeit in different plants). I keep trying to peel off one of these Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly stickers for my junkyard toolbox, but they never come off in one piece (strangely, stickers from cars built at Wilmington and Orion are easily removed from junkyard cars).

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsIt appears that one of this car’s final trips may have been to the grandbaby’s prom, and I hope the head gasket didn’t pop on the way to the venue. I also drove a big GM luxury sedan to my prom, though it was a mere Pontiac.

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, VentiPort - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsYou can tell the V6 Lucernes from the V8 versions by counting the VentiPort holes on the front fenders. Wouldn’t it make more sense to have the VentiPorts on the hood and decklid for Buicks with transverse-mounted engines, so they could line up with the cylinder banks?

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, LH rear view - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsAmericans want trucks now, or at least truck-shaped tall hatchbacks, and so the Lucerne got the axe after the 2011 model year. At least it outlasted the Oldsmobile, Saturn, and Pontiac Divisions, while earning a tie with Saab.

2006 Buick Lucerne in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsYou’ll find one in every car. You’ll see.


The press went crazy for it… or at least its lease terms.


OnStar will ensure that you don’t get lost in the hedge maze. Well, until 3G gets shut down, anyway.

For links to more than 2,200 additional Junkyard Finds, please visit the Junkyard Home of the Murilee Martin Lifestyle Brand™.

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75 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 2006 Buick Lucerne CXS...”


  • avatar
    jack4x

    I had one of these with the 3800 for a couple years. Considering the dynamic limitations of the chassis and the reputation of the Northstar, it’s hard to see why anyone would want or need the “upgrade”.

    If any car defined “boringly competent” it was the Lucerne. Never gave me any trouble, never gave me much excitement. The most memorable thing about the car was how strong the heated seats were. You could really cook yourself if you weren’t careful; newer cars seem to be weaker/safer in this respect which I don’t like.

    • 0 avatar
      Qwk69buick

      Actually the Northstar wasn’t a bad engine at all, just upkeep intensive, meaning oil changes, coolant etc. The Chrysler 2.7L was much worse. What I am stunned by is Cadillac “Standard of the World ” was still running the same 275hp and 4 speed auto drivetrain as was installed in the 98 SLS I owned around that same time. I had an 06 300 Limited from early 07 till November 08 when I got tired of the $425 monthly payment. Bought the SLS for $2700, had 145K miles and was in amazing shape but had a broken heating system fan in the middle of winter, hence cheap. Checked with Cadillac dealer $700 to replace and then found one online from a wrecking yard for $50 shipped. Drove that car for 4 years till it got into the 160K miles area and then sold it while everything was still in good physical and functional shape before a head gasket or something else failed. Actually sold it for $1K more than I paid. But way to keep up with technology Cadillac, Same engine transmission combo you started offering in the early 90’s and Same Hrsprs. Bought another 06 300 Limited in 2016 when the price was $4412 including tax and license about 10 payments on the one I had in 07.

  • avatar
    VeeDub

    Many old American engines in the 2000s. Not surprisingly, Honda and Toyota were sold for higher prices.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      That’s true, but those designed worked and were reliable for the price point. In fairness, Toyota and I believe Honda were introducing newer engine families in the early 00s some of which were used until the late 10s. In the same later period, domestics were using GDI motors which won’t have the longevity Toyota’s old but proven motors (even Honda initially screwed the pooch with the 1.5T vs flawless I4s in the early 00s).

  • avatar
    swester

    Yuck – one of those pre-’08 financial crisis ‘I booked a full-size but please don’t stick me in one of these’ GM rental options from the early 2000s. This belonged in a junkyard long before it actually ended up in one.

    This still was during the golden age of sedans, so who would actually cross-shop a Lucerne with the countless alternatives and settle on THIS? It seemed to be successful only in the Rust Belt, where all GM sales were driven by the tail end of the ‘you’ll never catch me in an import!’ brand of masochistic patriotism.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Yup. First decade of the 2000s, you couldn’t get away from the full size GM sedans. I’d try to rent a compact, and get “upgraded” to an Impala over my objections.

      OTOH, having owned 1960s-’70s Buicks, Oldsmobiles, and Chevrolets, I was automatically familiar with the layout of every GM instrument panel control they made. They were all the same!

      “Boringly competent” was what made GM a giant automaker. If you wanted more, you could get the Wildcat, Firebird, Camaro, GTO, or 442.

      Those were not boring, and still competent, but you should know how to wrench, or get to know your mechanic on a first name basis. Oh, and have extra cash.

    • 0 avatar
      MyerShift

      There’s nothing inherently wrong with these cars at all and aren’t junky the way you trendy nose pickers like to pretend.

  • avatar
    bogardus

    Circa 2014 or so my grandfather, despite no longer really ever driving himself any more, bought a very lightly used 2011 Lucerne (3.9) as the newest car he could get with a front bench seat (remember those?). Seemed like a reliable car, though it hardly ever got driven. When he died in 2020 (fortunately just before the pandemic hit and nursing homes went into lockdown), it was still hanging around. Despite having ten adult grandchildren and even some great grandchildren who were driving, nobody in the family wanted it. I probably would have taken it, but we had just bought a family sedan and it didn’t really make sense to add it to our fleet. I never heard what it eventually sold for, but I suspect whoever bought it got a great deal on a comfortable and reliable car in near perfect condition. Some days I still regret not taking it, especially given where the car market is now.

  • avatar
    Kyree

    The 2010 LaCrosse effectively grew to replace the Lucerne, graduating from its midsize W-body generation to the Super Epsilon platform, and sharing that architecture and a 111.4” wheelbase with the Cadillac XTS, Saab 9-5, and Chevy Impala. That’s not as big as that of the Lucerne (at 115.6”), but the LaCrosse had more interior volume.

    The 2017 Lucerne received an updated version of that platform and a 114.4” wheelbase.

    That said, both of the full-size LaCrosses were thoroughly modern, and probably alienated some of their buyer base.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I don’t think the Epsilon LaCrosse was any more “modern” per se than this car – both were big, FWD sedans. I think the problem was that the market for this kind of car moved from “sedan” to “SUV”. Same thing happened to every other car in this space. Even the Avalon is going away.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        The 2010 LaCrosse drove rings around Lexus ES and won most comparison tests.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Nonsense Norm. It was a $#!+box then and is where it belongs in this picture.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            Having had a 2012 Buick Lacrosse Premium I agree with Norm that this was a good Lexus competitor. It was far from being an S box and it with the last Impala were great cars the best the GM has made in a long long time.

          • 0 avatar
            eng_alvarado90

            Lucerne was nothing to write home about, but the 2nd Gen Lacrosse (2011-2016) was a legitimate Avalon/TL competitor. The fact you had a Lucerne and Lacrosse mixed up says everything you know about both.

            Nice interiors, decent powertrains and good styling are hard to find on a GM, but Lacrosse and the last Impala got them right. They came up short of success, not because they weren’t any good, but because the market shifted to CUVs.

      • 0 avatar
        MyerShift

        So, in what ways are full-size FWD cars NOT modern? FFS what an idiotic statement.
        The platform, powertrain, electrics, and features were all much more modern/trendy.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      As part of my GM retirement package I bought an 2009 “W” Impala. The interior was a bit spartan, the styling was dated… The Chevy gave me 80, 000 KLM ….(50,000 miles ) trouble free ..I traded it on a 2011 fire breathing Camaro …Big mistake ! !!! I corrected that error with a mid optioned 2014 Epsilon Impala. Nice car, but the grossly under powered, naturally aspirated four banger just didn’t work for me.

      Summer 2019 had me looking for one of the last of the Oshawa assembled Epsilon Impalas.. My search uncovered a gorgeous Hamtramck assembled 2019, Impala Black on Black, Premier Package . Exactly the car, and options I was seeking .. Being one of those aforementioned …”you’ll never catch me in an import brand ” sort of dude … the UAW sticker was good enough me.
      …An hour later it was my car.
      I get it dealer serviced , rust proof every fall..I’m pushing 70 years old … I’m thinking ,the Chevy is my forever car ..

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The last-gen Impala is a REALLY nice car with the right engine.

        • 0 avatar
          redapple

          Freed…
          Dont agree.
          W was the best.
          Epsilon had
          1 high beltline
          2 not good controls
          3 super high rear ledge.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The W-Impala had a decent concept but had all the refinement of a farm tractor. Putting the DOHC 3.6 in it helped a bit but didn’t address the phoned-in suspension or cheap interior.

            The Epsilon Impala had visibility challenges but was otherwise a much nicer place to spend time and also a more satisfying drive.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I have an acquaintance that bought a 2003 Impala LS for their daughter at the end of last year and asked me to give it a once over.
            And d*mn if I didn’t remember exactly why I had such affinity for those things. Loved it.

            As far as the final version of the Impala goes, I test drove one in 2014 but it wasn’t my thing.

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          The last generation Impala, sadly discontinued in the 2020 model year was a fine vehicle, even top rated by Consumers reports. In typical GM fashion, once we get it right we drop the model line.

          The Lucerne was based on the updated G-platform of which the Aurora, Riviera and DeVille DTS were based.
          Buick did have plans to sell the rwd Zeta based (G8, police, fleet Caprice) Park Avenue here but to no avail.

          • 0 avatar
            Johnster

            Consumer Reports rated the last generation Impala higher than the last generation Buick LaCrosse and Cadillac XTS.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    My buddy needed a decent mid to full size sedan as his car got totaled and he didn’t have a lot of cash to put down on a replacement back in 2014. He found a very clean 2009 Lucerne CXL that was pretty loaded up with the 227 Hp 3900 V6. It had 80K miles and drove like new. He kept that car well over 200K for his traveling sales rep job and it never broke down once or had any engine/transmission issues and was a very reliable companion the 4 years he owned it. His son eventually took it over and it sadly got smashed up several times so eventually was sold for cheap back in 2019. He misses it to this day and was only in his 40’s when he owned it!

  • avatar
    Zarba

    Currently daily driving a 2009 Lucerne CXL with the 3.9 I bought from my mother-in-law when she bought a 2017 LaCrosse. Solidly reliable at 163K miles. One recurring issue is the driver’s interior door handle has broken 3 times due to it being poorly-cast potmetal.

    Great highway cruiser, good gas mileage for the size, huge trunk, very quiet on the road. Handling, such as it is, is OK for the purpose but no one will ever mistake it for a sports sedan. If it had stiffer springs and shocks it would be much better, but that wasn’t the target market. When purchased, she didn’t spring for the MagnaRide suspension, and based on replacement cost, that was a good decision.

    A utilitarian machine for people who don’t want to think about their car.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Watch the 4T65-E on the 3900, it does not respond well to anything it considers abuse.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Does every sedan have to be a canyon carver and handle like a sports car? Are full size crew cab pickups based on the the same criteria of having sports like handling? How about a comfortable sedan with a roomy interior and decent trunk space that is easy to drive and comfortable. I believe that the trend in making sedans into BMW competitors along with small trunks has been the death of most sedans with buyers picking crew cab pickups and SUVs as the alternatives. My brother-in-law and his son are BMW fanboys and after riding in their BMWs I would take a 63 step side farm truck over a BMW for ride quality. Yes I have driven a BMW and they handle the curves nicely but the ride is terrible and do you really need a canyon carver when you are mostly driving in suburban traffic and on the interstate. Most people are not driving thru the Swiss Alps.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        First, off, I don’t think anyone would confuse a Lucerne – or any of its’s competitors, such as an Avalon – with any BMW. Completely different beasts. But in any case, those cars stopped selling. Even the Avalon is on its’ way out. If there were a market for these, they’d be selling, but that faded out a long time ago. Why?

        Not surprisingly, I have a theory, and it has more to do with size than ride quality. I think this generation of Americans likes their s**t super-sized – too-big houses, too-powerful guns, oversized fake boobies, ridiculously sized TVs, presidents with Kardashian-style over-the-top attention-wh0re tendencies, you name it. Down the street from me, in an hour or so people will start lining up around the block to pick up a 2,000 calorie lunch from Raisin’ Cane’s (while sitting in their cars, of course) that will put them to sleep all afternoon. Americans want their stuff big. Well, SUVs and trucks do that.

        Hell, even the imports are getting in on the game. BMW now makes a SUV the size of a Yukon, with a grill that you can see from Uranus. Mercedes makes SUVs with glow-in-the-dark three pointed stars the size of a golf-cart wheel.

        Meanwhile, sedans like the Lucerne were understated and rather tastefully styled. What, your car doesn’t say “look at me” to everyone else on the road? Can’t have that!

        Rant aside, tastes have clearly changed.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Excellent rant. We are the country of big ‘n’ cheap.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          True size is a major consideration but smaller trunks and slopped roof lines made sedans less desirable. As prices continue to go up on vehicles and gasoline there will be less big trucks and big suvs sold and that’s not saying that people will stop buying them but less will be sold. Even the large house trend will wane as more people will not qualify for mortgages and retirees will down size. Just because something is popular now does not mean it will always be popular. Growing up I remember when the average family would drive a large sedan or station wagon, then it became larger vans, then the mini car and mini truck craze, the the personal luxury car, then the minivan, then the suv, and now the AWD crossover and crew cab pickups. Things change and never remain exactly the same. Just because you want a large crew cab pickup or suv doesn’t mean you can afford it or quality for a loan. Even if you buy a large one you still have to pay for gas and maintenance and if you don’t earn enough money then it becomes more of what you can afford. I remember when people were unloading their large gas guzzling sedans for more efficient cars not just because of the price of gas but the availability of gas. This can happen again. Maintenance and utility bills on large homes are going up and that could eventually put a damper on the sale of mac mansions.

        • 0 avatar

          All that you say is true, but I have a more mundane theory about what killed sedans – tire size. The last 2019 Impala I rented had 235/45R-18 wheels. Any good-sized pothole could take it out. And why? Who wants Camaro wheels on a big sedan?

          The tires on a crossover are pretty tall with a 60 to 70 series aspect ratio. If Michelin were to bring out a modern version of that sized tire on the next Camcordaltima instead of canyon-carvers, maybe Americans would feel better about taking sedans over our abysmal roads.

  • avatar
    CaddyDaddy

    …. and to think this replaced something like an 04′ Park Avenue Ultra. Sad :(. If you look at the car, the styling, the interior, the powertrain, it was a assuredly a low effort result. GM deserved bankruptcy and to be fed to the wolves.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I’m oddly fond of these. If I ever came across one nicely equipped with the 3800 and other stars aligned, I might take the plunge. It’s a big, comfortable American car and the last of a breed honestly.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I know that I will get toasted for this, but if a similar vehicle (with the 3800) was available on the market as a new vehicle and priced at $35k or under, I would gladly buy one. We inherited an Allure/Lacrosse. The instrument panel, seats, NVH all suited me admirably. The only issue being that it had never been highway driven when we got it, that it had not been maintained and therefore a great many parts either seized or rusted out. We also had a door handle break and the requisite moisture in the headlight assembly. Despite the engine/transmission still running strong the time/cost of replacing parts convinced us to sell it.

    As an aside during part of my morning commute today I was driving beside a Buick Roadmaster wagon. Can’t remember the last one I saw on the road and working.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Northstar strikes again!

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      My friend had one of these but it wasn’t the head gaskets but oil seals. He had a re-seal on warranty at 80,000 miles…this was primarily the lower end of the engine..requires engine removal. When it happened again 50,000 miles later he dumped it. I would have thrown in a quart a thousand but he’s a stickler for clean garage floors.

      As H. Ross Perot said decades before “I don’t know much about cars but I know all GM cars leak oil”.

  • avatar
    gottacook

    That interior photo of the door panel shows a scooped-out design similar to the doors in my 2008 Saab (or “Saab”) 9-3 turbo 2.0. Then I noticed that the Lucerne’s radio head unit is the same as the Saab’s standard unit (mine has the optional navigation/radio/CD, a very costly choice for the original buyer but a lot prettier). I wonder what other unseen similarities they have.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Murilee, be on the lookout for a late model Tesla model S. Only jumped once.

  • avatar
    mikey

    I caught the Tesla jump on the news this AM ..That dude got some air !

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      As well as some air-BAGS when the front of the car hit the ground!

      Tesla must do what other manufacturers do when airbags pop: the vehicle turns on the hazard flashers and probably unlocks the doors, turns on the interior lights, and maybe dials 911. I could see the four-ways start up even before the car pinballed off the Subaru and however many garbage Toters it took out.

  • avatar

    A 2007 Lucerne would be better than any of the garbage SUVs Buick sells today. A Buick show showroom has become a sad sight.

    • 0 avatar
      swester

      When has a Buick showroom been anything other than a sad sight during the past 50 years or so? For decades, the whole brand has had the curb appeal of a senior citizen bingo hall somewhere in the Rust Belt.

      • 0 avatar
        kcflyer

        That’s a bit harsh. We really enjoyed our 08 Enclave. I still think they are a good looking SUV, if not one of the most attractive. V6 is not a monster but did the job. Comfy, etc. Too bad they really have not updated it much in 14 years.

  • avatar
    DungBeetle62

    It was right about this time my Dad says “Buicks are starting to look pretty good these days. They were always old man cars. I guess maybe that means now I’m old?”

    It was coming close to an “American Lexus” at that point, but by then most buyers in that demographic had got a Lexus Lexus.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Sorry to hurt anyone’s feelings, but the Lucerne is the runner-up to the Chevy Corsica/Beretta as the most anodyne, featureless, bland design to ever come out of GM. I’m sure Harley Earl has spun in his grave numerous times since he retired.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    Those radio and HVAC controls look very much like those in my 2014 silverado

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    The Lucerne was a near luxury sedan with cost cutting styling inside and out; like a surprised Impala wearing a v-neck cardigan to the prom.

    And that Northstar was completely pointless to a customer base that treated the gas pedal like there was an egg under it. I can count on one hand how many Lucernes I saw on the road with quad ports even when new.

  • avatar
    gregtwelve

    I bought a used 2018 3.6L Lacrosse for the wife 3 years ago and we are both very happy with it. it is quick, smooth, quiet, comfortable, well appointed and good looking in and out. On a road trip my best 25 mile mileage was 43MPG. Pretty good for a large car with 310 HP using regular gas. Have not had a single issue with it. I would buy another if GM didn’t kill it.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      That was my experience with a 2012 Buick Lacrosse E-assist Premium even the 2.4 seemed very refined for a 4 cylinder and the hybrid power train was smooth. Loved the interior with the blind spot monitoring and the heads up display. Just because it is GM and American made does not make it a terrible vehicle. The Buick Lacrosse and Chevrolet Impala are the best vehicles GM has made in a long long time and I would take either one of them over most of the new Buicks and Chevrolets of today.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I never drove one of these with the Northstar, but there was very little difference in driving experience between the final DeVille with the Northstar and one of these with the 3.9. They almost felt like the same car. Both smooth but very wallowy, both with indifferent interior design and quality and very obvious signs of cost-cutting not befitting premium brands. Pretty sure that the infotainment/climate panel on the dashboard was a common part between them.

    The 3.9 was a reliable engine with reasonable power and decent fuel economy but was quite noisy for a supposedly modern V6. A four-cylinder Avalon Hybrid provides a much quieter and smoother powertrain experience.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “They almost felt like the same car.”

      They are, I think even the same suspension because I don’t think Magnaride was being offered on Deville in the final years.

      The 3900 was not as refined as Our Lord, it really should not have even existed in light of 3800 and the 3.6 which replaced them both. If they wanted to have a hi-po and lo-po in the final years 3800 would have been cheaper and easier to keep. But GM is gonna GM.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Using the Northstar and LS4 as the top engines on the final run of FWD letter platform cars instead of the supercharged Series III will always bother me.

        All the money GM spent on a different pushrod V6 family would have been better spent on 4T6x replacement for the 3800 and a better oiling system for the 3.6L.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Don’t forget LS4 was sold alongside the L32 3800, evidently there was a bonehead decision for the “top” motor in W-body to be the LS4 and the G-body to be the Nostart. My guess is it was to share costs of the V8 with Cadillac when the marque was becoming Opel/Holden. The correct move of course was to just run 3800 and offer L32 for the top trims, the LS4 debacle didn’t even make sense in 2001ish when it was ordered other than to give C-P-C a “V8 car” to sell again.

          Agreed, the existence of 3900 was always facepalm to me.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          ‘GM is gonna GM’. Great line. The 3800 was one of the all time great engines. Provide it in a slightly detuned form, as is and supercharged to differentiate. One engine, for 3 different ‘markets’.

  • avatar
    eng_alvarado90

    But no-one said the Epsilon Impala was the best.
    What Freed said is actually true. The last Impala was a pretty fine car, with the right amount of power and a much improved interior

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    Correct me if I am wrong. The American-made sedans are down to:
    – Cadillac CT5
    – Cadillac CT4
    – Dodge Charger
    – Tesla Model S
    – Tesla Model 3

    Did I miss any?

    This state of affairs seems so bizarre that it hasn’t really sunk in.

    But as I think about it more, there really are only 3 or 4 American SUVs that I would miss in the least if they got discontinued.
    – Jeep Wrangler
    – Jeep Grand Cherokee
    – Cadillac Escalade
    – Ford Bronco (barely squeaks in)

    So, I think this has at least as much to do with the domestic automaker becoming irrelevant as it does with the sedan becoming irrelevant.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      I question the use of “American-made,” “American” and “domestic” in this context.

      (see ‘closure of bridge between U.S. and Canada which are not the same country affects automobile production in both countries – which are two different countries’ for hints)

      [Estados Unidos y Estados Unidos Mexicanos – ellos no son los mismos]

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transnational_corporation

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        Well, Canadians remind us from time to time that we should call them American too, so I figure that term at least should apply. (Though I haven’t seen how they react to people shouting “Death to America!!!”.)

        You’re right that “domestic” probably shouldn’t apply to the Charger. And thanks, jack4x, for pointing out that the 300 and the Malibu are still on sale (for now). The 300 comes from Canada, but the Malibu comes from Kansas from what I can tell.

        So we are down to the Malibu (Kansas), the two Teslas (California), and the two Cadillacs (Michigan).

        Coupes? The Challenger comes from Canada. The Mustang and the Camaro come from Michigan.

        Seven domestic USA cars.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      The Malibu and Chrysler 300 are still sold, though for how long who knows?

      Stuff like Lucid depends on if you want to count it or not.

  • avatar
    tmvette454

    your comment about driving a big GM to your prom reminded me about my wedding. I was supposed to drive my fathers almost new 1982 Olds Ninety Eight on my honey moon, Unfortunately the cat became clogged on wedding day and wouldn’t go over 30 mph. Gotta love ’80’s high tech

  • avatar
    Qwk69buick

    I am absolutely amazed they were still rocking the same drivetrain with the same horsepower numbers as the 98 Cadillac SLS that I owned. My 300’s with the 3.5L and NAG1 5 speed can put one of those in the rear view, let alone my C. And the car probably cost as much or more when new.

  • avatar
    sumgai1986

    I owned one of these for about a year. It was, uh, fine. The 3800 engine was the best part. I second the commenter who said the heated seats were fire. They made me have to poop in the morning on the way to work. No kidding. I couldn’t use them before 9 am.

  • avatar
    Germanicevich

    Back in January, my (formerly) trusty ’95 Ciera 3.1 lost its reverse and made a scary and loud metal chewing noise in the process. Even when it was still going strong at 150K, a trans rebuild or swap was out of the question. Not being a fan of SUVs or small imports, not much was available in my price range around Portland, OR. So I have to bite the bullet and buy a nice looking ’07 Lucerne SXL with the 3800 and 89K in the market for a month due to rebuilt title. In almost two months of commuting, the Lucerne has proven to be a significant upgrade from the Ciera, with a smooth ride, a reasonably quiet cabin, and an acceptable weight/power ratio. Oher that low mpg due to a code for open thermostat -I’m replacing it tomorrow- I have only praise for it. As a footnote, GM named the info system “DIC,” so, instead of giving it a girl’s name, I’m looking for some more masculine, some suggestion?

  • avatar
    Germanicevich

    Back in January, my (formerly) trusty ’95 Ciera 3.1 lost its reverse and made a scary and loud metal chewing noise in the process. Even when it was still going strong at 150K, a trans rebuild or swap was out of the question. Not being a fan of SUVs or small imports, not much was available in my price range around Portland, OR. So I have to bite the bullet and buy a nice looking ’07 Lucerne SXL with the 3800 and 89K in the market for a month due to rebuilt title. In almost two months of commuting, the Lucerne has proven to be a significant upgrade from the Ciera, with a smooth ride, a reasonably quiet cabin, and an acceptable weight/power ratio. Oher that low mpg due to a code for open thermostat -I’m replacing it tomorrow- I have only praise for it. As a footnote, GM named the info system “DIC,” so, instead of giving it a girl’s name, I’m looking for some more masculine, some suggestion?

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Ciera to Lucerne is a nice upgrade, because:
      • First rule of buying GM: Go big

      If by SXL you mean CXL and are looking for a masculine name, I suggest “Cecil” – one of the meanings of Cecil is “Sixth” so you get a built-in 3800 reference, plus the name matches the trim badge. [“CarL” would be another option]

      If a quiet cabin is important to you, I highly recommend some of the excellent sound deadening mat options available online (plus a roller). [Start with the two footwells and run it up the firewall as high as possible]

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