By on January 4, 2022

Ford

We don’t often cover it when a manufacturer’s build and price tool goes live, because it’s typically minor news, but we’re making an exception for the much-hyped Ford Lightning.

That’s right — from today forward, you can build and price a Lightning EV pickup on Ford’s consumer site. You couldn’t do this yesterday — I know, because I looked. Sometimes I while away my lunch hour on B and P sites. I’m fun at parties.

Available trims are Pro, XLT, Lariat, and Platinum. The Pro starts at just over $39K while the Lariat is over $90K.

Now that you know the site is live, go ahead and waste your boss’s time playing with the configurator. Tell ’em we said it’s OK.

[Image: Ford]

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41 Comments on “Ford Lightning Build and Price Tool Now Live...”


  • avatar
    Tarditi

    You can play with the configurator, but your price won’t reflect wild dealer markups on these trucks. $30k+ add to MSRP.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      There are enough Ford Dealers out there that one should be able to find one without the markup

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        But there are not enough being built. So even if a dealer doesn’t do ADMs any units they get will be sold so quickly only a handful of buyers might luck out. And that dealer would be foolish to pass up the opportunity to cash in. Ford dealers are marking up Mavericks, thus killing its bargain price. Anything new is being hit ADMs even value brands like Kia.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “Anything new is being hit ADMs even value brands like Kia.”

          If one is paying any significant ADM for a KIA they should really rethink their life.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            My office manager was asked to pay a $7500 ADM for a Telluride last year. She ended up finding one without an ADM, but it took (literally) months and she had to travel pretty far to do it.

            I have a reservation for a First Edition EV6, which guarantees me the ability to buy a car at whatever price my local dealer sees fit to charge. Curious what they’ll end up asking. If it’s too crazy my backup plan is to lease an XC60 Recharge for three years and hope the market has settled down by 2025.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            She had some wits about her to do so, its one thing to buy it its quite another to buy it and then pay 7,500 more to do so – especially since it ain’t that great to begin with.

            I’m not sure what EV6 is, is that a KIA?

            On the Volvo unless you have multiple dealerships where you live, I’d be leery of any model newer than MY16 and especially the hybrid or EV variants. Years back there were five Volvo dealers in my area, now its one dealer with two locations (Bill Gray being bought out) and Volvo itself pricing out the other ones sometime in the 2000s.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            EV6 is the electric car Kia’s introducing, on the same platform as the Hyundai Ioniq 5. First Edition means AWD, the bigger battery pack, and a few other goodies.

            https://www.motortrend.com/reviews/2022-kia-ev6-electric-suv-first-drive-review/

            I’m in Volvo country in the Boston suburbs, so not at all worried about getting it serviced.

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            Regarding the Volvo EV

            FWIW, my in-laws have the XC 60 or 40 EV (honestly I can’t remember, it is not very big), I was able to drive it briefly. Nice car. Quick, nice interior, and of course Volvo seats which are usually the best part of owning a Volvo.
            Thus far they have not had any issues with it.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “The Pro starts at just over $39K while the Lariat is over $90K.”

    Plus $10K ADM.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I haven’t seen anything on how Ford dealers are handling X-plan buyers, who are supposedly able to buy vehicles without ADM.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I was just thinking about X-plan the other day, and if it had been… X’d out or not.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        It is always up to the discretion of the selling dealer whether they will honor an X plan (or other supplier) price or not.

        My experience, having held all of the Big 3 discounts for most of my working life, is that unless you are very lazy or poor at negotiation, they aren’t very useful. Any in-demand vehicle will be “ineligible” and a competent negotiator can get any normal vehicle below the supplier price without much difficulty.

        Nowadays of course, everything is in-demand.

    • 0 avatar
      P0442-Small-Leak

      I ordered a Maverick XLT hybrid back in October using X-Plan (supplier plan). At the time a couple dealers declined to accept an X-Plan order but I found one that would accept it nearby so I went with them. The X-Plan discount on a Maverick is pretty small, maybe $250 on a base model and $300 on what I ordered. But it makes for a simpler, cleaner deal since you aren’t haggling. Of course I now have a lengthy wait for the actual delivery.

  • avatar
    ajla

    If you’re wanting to buy a vehicle in 2022, you should probably be changing those plans unless you have an “in” somewhere.
    I expect the Lightning will still be around once inventory ADM madness is over, although I don’t know what the base MSRP will be by then.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    “Ford Lightning Build and Price Tool Now Live”

    A couple dozen people are excited.

    If you think used cars are expensive now, just wait till used cars are the only gas vehicles you can buy in a decade or two.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      I’m excited!

      I’ll likely replace my GMC Sierra Hybrid with a Tesla Cybertruck. The Cybertruck’s expected range of 500+ miles per charge, a rumored million-mile battery, and a corrosion-resistant stainless steel body will be very a difficult vehicle to beat if/when it hits the market. One Cybertruck may be able to carry my family and my stuff everywhere I want to go until I retire.

      However, there are several vehicles that I’ll need to drive before I can buy it.

      I was pleasantly surprised by how good the Rivian R1T appears to be, even though it’s more of a luxurified Tacoma TRD type truck. They also move silently and smoothly in a way that is hard to descrive. They’re definitely worth a deeper look. I wasn’t special enough to get a test-drive when I went to see it at the factory, but I did get to sit in one and watch them on the test-track — it’s a very good truck!

      The F-150 Lightning is worth a second look, and I’ll be interested in the Silverado EV that will be revealed this week.

      ICE vehicles are boring and buzzy. I can’t wait to get off that roller coaster.

      Nobody’s banning ICE vehicles, but they’re less than 5 years away from being absolutely slaughtered in the marketplace by smooth/quiet/cheap/simple/reliable EVs. ICE vehicles will remain available for commercial/niche applications, of course, because they really are useful. The only thing that needs to change to make that happen is a bit more reduction in battery price — and that’s pretty much inevitable with the number of big battery plants being built in the United States.

      This is a very exciting time for those of us who aren’t bothered by a little change!

      The change-resistant among you are free to pay high gas and maintenance prices for as long as you can afford it. [shrug]

      • 0 avatar
        SoCalMikester

        my gas and maintenance on a small toyota and 2 scooters is minimal, at best. but i did get in to F a few years ago and amassed over 2000 shares. this run is going to last for a while, but wont last forever.

  • avatar
    ajla

    At MSRP (which as has been said very few will be paying this year):

    Lightning Pro with spray-in liner and 9.6Kw generator: $43k
    Lightning XLT Standard Range with spray-in liner and 9.6Kw generator: $56k

    F-150 XL Supercrew 4WD 3.3L with no options: $42.8k
    F-150 XL SuperCrew 4WD 3.5L Hybrid with light options: $51K
    F-150 XLT SuperCrew 4WD 3.5L Hybrid with light options: $56k

    If you keep the 230 mile range standard battery then the Lightning is fairly affordable as far as AWD crewcab trucks are concerned. However, going for the larger 300 mile battery is a $19.5K upcharge on the XLT ($10K for the battery and $9.5K for a required option package.) If you want the big battery might as well get the Lariat because the price ends up almost the same.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “We don’t often cover it when a manufacturer’s build and price tool goes live, because it’s typically minor news, but we’re making an exception for the over-hyped and clearly phoned in Ford F150 Mach E”

    Fixed.

    And wow those prices are awful. Imagine paying all that money for something with such awful range.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      If you’re using it as a work truck on an around-town fleet, that range is basically irrelevant and the fuel and maintenance savings add up.

      Heck, if you’re using it in a two-vehicle household and it’s between this and a large SUV (which describes a good half of the houses in my neighborhood), then the range is basically irrelevant, too.

      • 0 avatar
        SoCalMikester

        “If you’re using it as a work truck on an around-town fleet, that range is basically irrelevant and the fuel and maintenance savings add up.”

        if i was running a local fleet, id look into electric options, of course.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        No the range is not irrelevant. Fleet sales aside (because fleet sales are very bad and don’t help Ford or are very significant in numbers) the range is extremely important.

        Just over 200 miles, completely unloaded is abysmal. Add in a couple sheets of sheetrock or a small utility trailer and the range will be far worse. Add in lower temperatures and the reduced range from that and it’s clear that EVs are just a colossal joke and this F150 Mock E does nothing to change the major shortcomings.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          “because fleet sales are very bad and don’t help Ford or are very significant in numbers”

          Showing again just how little you know about the auto industry in general and trucks specifically.

          Fleet sales are neccessary to the profitability of full size trucks. The numbers are significant and while the profit per unit is lower than the average retail truck those fleet trucks help keep the plants running at maximum effeciency and lower the per unit development and tooling costs for those retail trucks. If they didn’t have the fleet sales they would need to raise retail prices or accept a lower margin, well at least in a sane, pre-pandemic market.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            No…Not at all. The margin on fleet sales is close to zero. Maybe a couple hundred bucks. A lack of fleet sales would have zero effect on retail pricing.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Fleet sales have heathy profits thanks to building them all alike, tens of thousands in a row identical, they go straight to the users, and they’re not expecting greatness, easy to satisfy, etc.

            They also add greatly to volume and make the loaded trucks cheaper to put out.

            And no truck is legit without fleet sales. Check Tundra, Titan. Including the RCSB, they lead to sales of mid trim and loaded luxury, direct and indirect.

            So not everything is about simply max loaded, max MSRP all the time.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @ Denver Mike, Ol EB doesn’t understand things like amortization and fixed overhead and how much that factors into the cost to produce a vehicle.

  • avatar
    tane94

    I wonder if Ford will offer volume discounts for fleet buyers of the base model? Lordstown Motors and its long-delayed pickup is screwed by Fords aggressive pricing of the base model.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      That’s a really good question, given the cost of a new model launch I can’t see them wanting to wheel and deal very much initally.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Based on what I’ve seen on my state’s bids there was little on the 2022 Maverick and I don’t expect any meaningful fleet discounts on the Lightning for at least a couple of years.

  • avatar
    Tirpitz

    The thing that interests me about the Lightning is the option to have it power your house in a blackout. I’ve never been able to find out what options you need to equip with to make that work beyond installing the Ford charger. Do you need the bigger battery? Can’t tell. If it worked on the entry level Pro version that would be a compelling around town EV for me.

    As for markups I have a Maverick hybrid on order and my dealer has assured me that they doing all orders as MSRP and allowing X-Plan. However if I decide for any reason not to take the truck they will apply markup and put it on the lot.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      If you lose power that often you need a bigger solution than a mediocre pickup.

    • 0 avatar
      LectroByte

      If you lose power that often, then a plugin hybrid (or a regular hybrid) is probably a better choice. After all, if you can’t charge your EV, do you really want to run its battery down even further by using it to power your house?

      I lived in a very rural area and had two big inverters on our hybrid, our power would be out for a day or two every month, it worked out pretty well for us.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Yep. The whole “run your house off your mediocre EV” is great for press releases but its an amazingly impractical gimmick.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @LectroByte: “After all, if you can’t charge your EV,”

        Sure you can. If you’re in range of public charging, especially if it’s a level 3 charger, you can essentially haul electricity back to your house. Even in cases where you have storage batteries like a Powerwall or a sodium-ion pack, you could use the truck to go and fetch power and recharge the home batteries to keep them going longer.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is the first time I can remember being excited about a full-size pickup. I’ll never buy—a pickup bigger than a Maverick makes about is much sense in my life as an affair with Stormy Daniels—but this is probably the most important introduction in the US vehicle market in a couple of decades.

    I have to say that Ford really sweated the appearance details in the highest trims. The Lariat and Platinum are in another league of visual refinement from any gas F-150, or any other gas pickup, you can buy. The shaped front fillers and bumpers, the body-color everything, the tightly integrated light bars front and rear, and the lack of giant ugly chrome badges are all fantastic. Everyone who sees a Lightning Platinum and ever thinks about trucks is going to know immediately that it’s special.

  • avatar
    BSttac

    All this hype about 200k refundable reservations will likely result in much fewer sales given these higher prices.

    • 0 avatar
      Bluegas

      Have you seen the used car market lately? Ford doubled production to 150k to keep up with demand. If they’re using their research off of the Bronco they will end up with more than 50k people on a waiting list for the next 2023 model. They also have a waiting list for the Mach E. Are you seeing the trend? They’re going to produce less new ICE vehicles to push the masses into the new expensive EV market. Used cars will continue to insane and new cars will be few and far between. Waiting will be the new norm while ride share companies see their businesses grow.

      • 0 avatar
        Astigmatism

        If they doubled production, how are they producing less?

        This isn’t some giant evil master plan, it’s the simple result of a busted supply chain. OEMs all thought the economy would tank and people wouldn’t be buying new cars back in the spring of 2020 so they slashed production estimates and canceled microchip orders. It turns out they were wrong, as people who couldn’t go on vacation or even out to eat spent all their money on consumer electronics and durable goods instead, but by the time the OEMs realized this and tried to re-up their chip orders, they were at the back of the line behind Apple, Samsung, LG, etc., who were ordering much more expensive (and profitable) chips, at the same time availability was reduced because of factories that were subject to COVID lockdowns in Taiwan and import bans from China. And so here we are. This has been pretty widely covered.

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