By on August 7, 2018

It seemed like Ford Motor Company had answered prayers Tuesday, after an online configurator for the 2019 Ranger pickup finally appeared on the automaker’s consumer website. But, just as quickly as it appeared, Ford pulled it down. Apparently someone goofed up.

A company spokesman told Jalopnik that the posting “was a mistake,” adding that, “the pricing shown is inaccurate.” The build and price tool, the spokesman said, will appear next week.

It’s true that the configurator showed a regular cab selection, but clicking it only took you to the extended SuperCab bodystyle. A fleet or overseas option, maybe? We have to wonder just how different the actual pricing will be compared to what we just saw. So, for the sake of future comparison, here’s what Ford’s now-disappeared site told us (or didn’t) about the 2019 Ranger:

(Note: the following text was about to go live when we learned of Ford’s alleged mistake. Keep in mind that what you read may be completely inaccurate. Time will tell.)

Starting at $24,000 (plus a $1,095 destination fee) for a rear-drive, SuperCab XL model, would-be buyers will find that getting into a Ranger could easily set them back more than $40k, once they reach their desired configuration.

As you’d expect, the base XL is a total stripper, with the only appeal being the model’s newness (to this market, anyway), as well as its 2.3-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder and 10-speed automatic transmission. While Ford hasn’t revealed the truck’s power specs, that same engine makes up to 310 horsepower and 350 lb-ft of torque in other applications. Engine stop-start comes standard.

Anyway, cloth buckets, 16-inch silver steel wheels, and AM/FM stereo rounds out the highlights on this model. Vinyl buckets are available at no extra charge but actual niceties (sliding rear window, power mirrors, cruise control, SYNC, backup camera) will cost you extra. Strangely, the configurator added $300 of unspecified “options” that can’t be erased from the base XL shortly after I started playing with the tool. Base MSRP remains at $24,000, though — over a grand less than the entry-level Toyota Tacoma SR, but four grand more than a less-powerful base Chevrolet Colorado.

Adding capacity, the SuperCrew XL 4×2 rings in at $27,615 after destination, the 4×4 SuperCab stickers for $29,555, and a four-wheel-drive four-door XL tips the financial scales at $31,785. Should the interior prove too spartan, fun things purchased at yard sales can be carted back home in the Ranger’s six- or five-foot box.

Only two vibrant colors exists outside of the XL greyscale, and that’s Lightning Blue and Saber (orange-copper). Alright, onward we go towards volume models with family appeal.

Stepping up to the far more appealing XLT trim, the Ranger dons 17-inch painted aluminum wheels, SYNC, Co-Pilot 360 driver assist features, and two shades of premium cloth. For a 4×2 Supercab, the XLT’s price floor starts at $29,035 after destination. Luxury and technology packages (chrome and towing, too) join a laundry list of options. Still no standard sliding rear window, though, but you’ll be able to add Hot Pepper Red to your paint palette.

As most buyers will gravitate towards a full backseat, the SuperCrew XLT stands to be popular. That model carries a $31,210 price tag, or $35,210 in 4×4 CrewCab guise. Should you choose to check almost every options box available, while forgoing the FX4 package, you’ll be staring down the barrel of a $41,855 after-delivery price tag.

But there’s also the Lariat trim to consider. This snazzy model starts at $33,305 in 4×2 SuperCab clothing, but, as no one would purchase a high-zoot truck in such a configuration, let’s look at our other options. A Lariat 4×2 SuperCrew stickers for $35,480, bringing the trim’s standard leather, SYNC3, push-button ignition, and LED headlamps aboard for the whole family to enjoy. Adding four-wheel drive brings the Monroney to $39,480.

There’s also sport, chrome, and tow packages, should you desire it, as well as White Platinum paint for an extra $595. Outfitting our Lariat with every option — bedliner, technology and sport packages, running boards, etc — brought the price to over $46,000, which would then require tax and admin. Pushing $50k, for sure, but it would be an odd duck who’d choose this configuration over an F-150.

Our own Adam Tonge, who’s waited patiently for the configurator to go live, provided this image as the reason for his newfound Ranger distrust:

There’ll be plenty of food for thought waiting for Ford truck buyers once the Ranger goes on sale this fall.

[Images: Ford Motor Company]

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49 Comments on “Whoops: Ford Pulls 2019 Ranger Build and Price Tool From Website, Claims It Made a Mistake...”


  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    I hope the chassis cab will be offered here, and with the crew cab, although I’d settle for a 4wd SuperCab XL chassis cab- then add a drop-side flatbed.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    When Ford makes a mistake and no one is maimed or killed, it’s a good day.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    What? The higher trim Ranger will cost more then the lower trim F-150. Makes sense and when your done you’ll be able to drive that nicer Ranger home and put it in your garage, neat :)

  • avatar
    salmonmigration

    Outside of halo options (GM Duramax or Toyota 6MT), this is definitely the best powertrain in the midsize realm.

    Regardless, if this is really the pricing then I forecast a flop!

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Its competitive with the entries in the segment.

      It costs just as much to build a midsize truck as it does a full-size, that was the argument Ford used for not bringing the Ranger here before. But, people said they didn’t care about that, they just wanted something that wasn’t as big as a half ton. So, here it is.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Did you know a small Mercedes and a small BMW cost more then a BIG Cadillac or Lincoln? It’s crazy, but true. How do they ever sell BMWs or Mercedes?

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          LOL, cuz the guy who wants a small BMW wants something fun, and a big Lincoln or Cadillac isn’t that kind of fun.

          The guy in the small Mercedes wants every one to know how super wonderful he is, how successful he is, and how his stripper girlfriend is the hottest around. It doesn’t matter that his car is inferior to a loaded Camry, he bought the (lighted, no doubt) badge, and the salesmen threw in the rest of the car for free.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “Did you know a small Mercedes and a small BMW cost more then a BIG Cadillac or Lincoln?”

          Alex, What are veblen goods?

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    PRICING MAKES ME ANGERY

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    “Our own Adam Tonge, who’s waited patiently for the configurator to go live, provided this image as the reason for his newfound Ranger distrust:”

    (eye roll)

    There is a certain subset of people who want a smaller truck, period. (Although those same people will likely whine about the Ranger not being small enough.) I have noticed that the extended cab lower optioned (LS, SLE, now XL) models of the midsize trucks are often purchased by AARP members who simply want a smaller more simply optioned truck.

    There are fleets who will buy a small truck for a variety of reasons. My school district is not buying a full size truck for the guy who goes to collect water samples from the wells they own on various rural properties (He gets an extended cab Canyon SL.)

    Then there are the “lifestyle” buyers who buy a midsize to haul mountain bikes on a rack etc.

    Those buyers don’t really care that a truck 80% of the size is not 80% of the price of a full size truck.

    Further complicating matters is the fact that cost to manufacture a midsize truck is much closer to the cost of manufacturing a full size truck than many likely want to believe.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Stop making sense, Dan!

      We don’t always agree, but we’re on the same page here.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        That’s just by observation.

        One other category of owner seems to be the rancher who wants an “spare truck” (and prefers the dealer support of NEW or leases) – I’ve got a one ton diesel beast but that’s not what Momma needs to go to tractor supply and pick up a few things. If I buy the V6 midsize with towing package I can haul 5,000-7,500 lbs when I don’t need the big beasts 10,000 plus towing capacity.

        Personally I’d love a truck the size of the 2nd gen S10 but I also appreciate that current Canyon/Colorado aren’t a dismal place to spend time vs the old “tin can” 1st gen trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      I want a smaller truck. I have been waiting for the smaller truck. But these prices are too high. I might as well step up to an F150. Because of rebates and pricing quirks, the F150 STX is actually a better value than the Ranger STX. I’d argue that the F150 STX is actually better equipped than the Ranger XLT with Sync3 and other niceties.

      I want a truck that fits in my garage. I’ll wait for the price corrections, but the Ranger needs to be significantly cheaper than the F150. The F150 is Ford’s magnum opus. It is everything that Ford does right. If this is what the pricing actually is, I’ll have to park outside of the garage.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        If I were to buy a truck it would be a less than full size truck due to space constraints. In my current domicile there is not room for both my wife’s vehicle AND a full size truck in my driveway. I am NOT parking on the street – many of my neighbors do not and there’s too much danger of having the vehicle hit on what is fairly narrow street. (I can just snug my 2nd gen Highlander in the gap to the right of her Terrain – fenced property, narrow opening.)

        Therefore I would buy a Canyon/Ranger/Tacoma (Frontier is too old) crew cab 4×4 and likely wait until model year changeover to see if I could get a deal. Then the price difference doesn’t seem as dear.

        However I’m also smart enough to know that I’m not really a great customer for the product.

      • 0 avatar
        srh

        “””
        I want a smaller truck. I have been waiting for the smaller truck. But these prices are too high. I might as well step up to an F150.
        “””

        This is an absurd statement. You want a smaller truck, here it is. It’s cheaper than the F-150. Maybe not a whole lot cheaper, but cheaper nevertheless.

        So you get what you want, and you save money. Yet you are thinking of buying an F-150 that you /don’t/ want instead. Huh?? With that logic you may as well step on up to the F-350, which you definitely don’t want, because honestly it’s only priced incrementally over the F-150.

        There’s a segment of the population who remembers the base $17,000 Ford Ranger they bought 20 years ago, and expects a modern vehicle to hit that same price point despite 20 years of inflation and modern amenities. Sorry, but that is a ludicrous request.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I expect it to be a decent amount cheaper with similar equipment. There is no reason for me to buy a $37,000 Ranger just to get CarPlay. It should be standard on the SuperCrew.

          I want a smaller truck. I would be happy to buy on for $30K with 4×4 and CarPlay connectivity. Once you get above $35K, the value is gone.

          And no, this is different that the F150 vs F350. The F150 is always cheaper when adjusting for equipment and comparing like models.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    $671 a month for a Ford Ranger isn’t bad.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    I have seen one of these driving around the San Antonio area with Carrier livery.

  • avatar
    civicjohn

    Pretty easy to push a Colorado over $40k with no problem either.

  • avatar
    civicjohn

    Pretty easy to push a Colorado over $40k with no problem either.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Ima need a 4×2 supercab XLT powered by the 2.7T V6 in aquamarine teal with some purple/black “splash” graphics.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Around here, a lot of the businesses that used to run small pickups are now running Transit Connects. The fleet-spec Ranger should come in at the same price as a TC. You might think it’s an apples-to-oranges comparison, but I don’t think that.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      Most small businesses would be better served by a Transit Connect or Promaster City than a Ranger or Colorado. If they need more capability than a TC / ProC, they’ll probably opt for a full size pickup.

      The real reason small businesses used to use Rangers and S-10 pickups is that there was nothing like the Transit Connect or Pro City available, really. At least in the U.S. Now that those exist, I’d think relatively few fleets would be interested in a Ranger.

      I’m surprised Ford and FCA haven’t offered a crew seat, i.e. third man jump seat, for their small cargo vans. They sell both in passenger configuration already, so the parts are there. I can think of plenty of times where having only a two-seater is kind of a pain, and a third seat would be welcome. You can get this on a Sprinter, but few other vans. Mercedes apparently gets it.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Ford offered the Crew Van package for a number of years on the Econoline and it was dropped because the take rate was so low. It made it a 5 seater as the used the same basic seat that would be there in a passenger van. Note it was not the same as the 5 passenger Club Wagon as it was bare steel behind the 2nd row.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    A business near me builds bridges and delivers the oversized beams via truck & trailer throughout much of the Northeast. As long as I can remember the company has had a fleet of Ford Rangers as escort vehicles. The demise of the Ranger in recent years forced them to begin buying a few Tacomas. I happened to chat with one of their tractor trailer drivers last week. He said that when he needs to drive an escort truck, he prefers the old Rangers even though many do not have cruise control and other modern niceties. I asked him, why? He said the 4-cylinder Tacomas can’t stay out in front of the loaded tractor trailers on the hills!

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “He said the 4-cylinder Tacomas can’t stay out in front of the loaded tractor trailers on the hills!”

      No doubt the latest gen tacoma with the 4cyl is no hot rod, but that is just complete nonsense.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        At high altitude, a 4 cylinder 4X4 Tacoma at full throttle, I could see getting passed by loaded Semis, having to push a huge, blunt “WIDE LOAD” sign and strobes. With a strong headwind? No question.

      • 0 avatar
        EquipmentJunkie

        Confirmed. I spoke to my brother and he said that he recently drove his friend’s ’15 Tacoma 4-cyl, 5MT, 4WD back east from Pittsburgh on the PA Turnpike. He said that he had to be very prompt when downshifting on hills to maintain speed and the Tacoma was not able to pick up speed on the hills.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    The pricing is a concern, but I’ll be wanting a lot more data before I order one.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Here is a marketing idea (from someone who isn’t a marketer) Put up a fake configurator. Let people go thru it to see what they like and don’t. Then let them guess at the price. A little market research thrown in for free.

    ps To all manufacturers I’m retired and would work cheap. Especially if I don’t have to get up early and commute. I got some other wacky ideas.

  • avatar
    S197GT

    i want (and have) a small truck and have no desire for a full-size pickup. I like that loading up my ’01 Ranger for a camping trip, mulch, or with my motorcycle, I feel like I’m using most of it’s utility and it is everything I need and not more than… My son and I took it to an off road park and it wasn’t too big for the trails.

    The only thing I would change is a slightly wider space between the wheel wells so I could get my 42″ lawn tractor in it; not that I’ve needed to yet.

    So, glad they are coming out with a new Ranger so I can buy a used one years from now.

  • avatar
    Dan

    I’ll freely admit that my F-150 is much larger than I have any practical need for it to be, a pain to park, and if they’d put an approximation of its good qualities in a 90% sized package, even at no discount at all, I’d buy one instead.

    Those good qualities consist of the powertrain, the quiet cabin, the great visibility, the roomy seats, the 36 gallon tank, and not being styled like a suppository.

    And this truck carries over absolutely none of them.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Parking’s a pain. Except myself and most Americans that buy pickups would tell you 1/2 tons are the Goldilocks of all pickups. Totally worth it, despite any parking melodrama.

      I accept the challenge going into big cities and beach communities. Once I’m parked, centered in the space, mirrors folded in, the rest is their problem.

  • avatar
    micko4472

    Well, if you think the Ranger is too expensive, may I recommend a Nissan
    Frontier. For about $33k srp, you can get a very nice truck. For a few
    grand more, you can get the offroad version, which is pretty decent even
    if it won’t run the Rubicon Trail. Yes, I know, Nissan does not have
    all the electronica, but you don’t really need it anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      The Frontier is pretty dated. The interior feels like it is from a late nineties Geo. MPG is sketchy. Second row space utilization in the crew cab is just short of dismal. I can see the appeal, I guess, from a certain standpoint. The things are probably reliable, and you’ll likely have a great supply of salvage yard parts for years due to them making the things for so long. It would be hard for me to shell out thirty grand for something so past the sell by date, though. Maybe I’m not as wealthy as the average TTACer, but 30-35 grand is a decent chunk of change for me, so there better be some surprise and delight, so to speak for that amount of money. The Frontier offers little of either.

  • avatar
    road_pizza

    Not concerned with pricing as I can get either A or D Plan pricing, and will be ordering an XLT Supercab probably in February. Can’t wait!


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