Ford Bronco Doesn't Ace Safety Tests

Matthew Guy
by Matthew Guy
ford bronco doesn t ace safety tests

While the full-size Bronco might be one of the hottest games in town, its performance in some key safety measures failed to wholly impress the IIHS crash test dummies. Their major beefs? Headlights and whiplash.

This is not to say the Bronco is an unsafe vehicle or that it flies apart at the seams like in the zero-star performances of some machines from overseas. In fact, it garnered top marks in a number of areas, including the notoriously tough small overlap front crash tests on both the passenger and driver sides. That’s the exam meant to simulate sailing headfirst into a solid wall or low barrier, making contact with the immovable object in the car’s headlight area. The only place in which the IIHS noted any issue here was when one of the dummies appeared to suffer an injured ankle thanks to a dead pedal which ended up at a wonky angle after the crash test.

But it was those big round peepers which caused some consternation, earning the Bronco just a ‘marginal’ overall rating. The IIHS testers said on a simulated straightaway, visibility was fair on both sides of the road. On curves, however, visibility was deemed to be inadequate in all tests. That quartet of exams includes 250m and 150m radius curves in both left and right directions if you’re wondering and you probably weren’t.

It’s worth noting the Base trim and the Big Bend without an extra-cost lighting package have even dimmer headlamps thanks to their less expensive illumination systems. IIHS tests high beams as well, of course, finding them to offer good, visibility on the right side of the road and fair on the left side when measured on a straightaway stretch of tarmac. On curves, visibility was fair on the gradual right and both left curves but inadequate on the sharp right curve. As you’d expect, high-beam assist compensates for some limitations of this vehicle’s low beams on the straightaway and all 4 curves. Thank you, Captain Obvious.

As for the result in a head restraint and seat test, the IIHS is said to be looking for a number of results in that assessment. Good geometry is essential for an effective head restraint, they say, going on to explain that if a head restraint isn’t behind and close to the back of an occupant’s head, it can’t prevent whiplash in a rear-end collision. This is why it’s important to properly adjust the things when getting behind the wheel of a car and not simply leave them where Aunt Doris had them while driving to church. Bronco scored ‘acceptable’ here, thanks to the neck of a test dummy which was found to have been subjected to a moderate force in a simulated rear-end crash.

Still, the 4-door midsize SUV did earn a “good” rating (the highest possible) in five out of six crashworthiness tests. Sure beats those zero-star econoboxes in other markets.

[Image: Ford]

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  • Zackman Zackman on Dec 17, 2021

    I'm really surprised that headlight issues remain in this era. After all, Chrysler seemed to be in the crosshairs for their substandard headlights many years ago - along with almost everything else they built. Makes me wonder why this is still a problem. Projection lenses? If that's so, they're only good for the straightaway. When I had my 2012 Impala, the headlights seemed ok, but when the ditch lights were switched on, they lit up the road directly in front of the car and even a bit beyond the sides, which made all the difference. Perhaps Ford rushed the Bronco to market a bit too early? I think it's still a nice vehicle, though, and wouldn't mind owning one.

  • Art Vandelay Art Vandelay on Dec 17, 2021

    Did it flip over in any of these tests? If I remember, that is the bar the Wrangler set.

  • Lou_BC I'm confused, isn't a Prologue a preview? This would be a preview of a preview.
  • Dianne Started my investments by learning from the wrong people and you guessed right, that turned on me in the worst way possible. In 16 months, I had lost approximately $100,000. The bitter part of investment that no one talks about. That was too much over such a short duration of time. What makes the system can also break it. And so I decided to try out MYSTERIOUS HACKER on the same to get back my money. Had futile attempts for 2 months. Until I crossed paths with a Mysterious hacker. All he asked for was a few details regarding the investment and in a couple hours, I had my money back without any upfront payment.WEBSITE: https://mysterioushacker.info TELEGRAM: +15625539611 EMAIL: mysterioushack666@cyber-wizard.com
  • Dianne Started my investments by learning from the wrong people and you guessed right, that turned on me in the worst way possible. In 16 months, I had lost approximately $100,000. The bitter part of investment that no one talks about. That was too much over such a short duration of time. What makes the system can also break it. And so I decided to try out MYSTERIOUS HACKER on the same to get back my money. Had futile attempts for 2 months. Until I crossed paths with a Mysterious hacker. All he asked for was a few details regarding the investment and in a couple hours, I had my money back without any upfront payment.WEBSITE: https://mysterioushacker.info TELEGRAM: +15625539611 EMAIL: mysterioushack666@cyber-wizard.com🥭
  • Tre65688381 Definitely more attractive than it's German rivals, but I'd still rather have the standard GV80. One of the best looking mid size SUV/Crossovers on the road, in my opinion. And the updates for 2024 hone it gently in the right direction with more tasteful but subtle changes.
  • TheEndlessEnigma GM, Ford and Stellantis have significant oversupply of product sitting on dealer lots and banked up in holding yards across the country. Big 3 management is taking advantage of UAW's action to bring their inventories inline to what they deem reasonable. When you have models pushing 6 months of supply having your productions lines shut down by a strike is not something that's going to worry you. UAW does not have any advantages here, but they are directly impacting the financial well being of their membership. Who will be the first to blink? Those UAW members waving the signs around and receiving "strike pay" that is, what, 20% of their wages? UAW is screwing up this time around.
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