By on November 22, 2021

Jo Borras/TTAC.com

The Mercedes-Benz EQS 580 4MATIC is the three-pointed star’s first real attempt at an all-electric flagship in its 100-plus year history, and its importance to the brand cannot be overstated. Simply put, Tesla is already beating Mercedes-Benz, and the upstart, 500-mile range Lucid Air isn’t going to pull any punches, either. The EQS must come out swinging, then, and it absolutely cannot fail to deliver on the promise of that “S”.

I recently had a chance to take an extended test drive in both the 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 450+ and 580 4MATIC models at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, and the experience was – let’s say “not what I expected”.

THE LAND YACHT

Back in the days of the W126 – a car some would call a high point for S class Mercedes – the big luxury cars from Lincoln or Cadillac were decidedly boaty. They isolated you from the road with their soft suspensions and high sidewall tires. The steering, too, had a nautical sort of feel. The Mercedes, however, did not. The W126 felt planted and secure. It was soft, yes, but the suspension felt capable. You weren’t isolated from the road and all its potholes and imperfections – you were shielded. The stiff chassis and expertly tuned suspension were in a different league than the Fleetwood or Town Car, and you could even hustle the grosser MB well enough, if you were so inclined.

Jo Borras/TTAC.com

In Comfort mode and on the elevation-changes surrounding COTA, the new EQS 580 4MATIC is eerily reminiscent of those old cars … just not the Mercedes ones.

“This is terrible,” I said to my co-pilot, a young-ish MBUSA product specialist that came along on the extended test ride who invited me to “stretch the car’s legs”. “I can’t feel the road,” I told her. “I can’t even tell where the front wheels are pointing.”

“Hmm,” she said. “Let me put it into sport mode for you.”

“Is that going to make a big diff—oh!” I said, genuinely surprised at the noticeable difference from just a few moments ago. “Oh! OK, here we go.”

In about the same 30 seconds it took you to read those last few paragraphs, my impression of the new Mercedes-Benz EQS went from, “This is a disaster,” to “I can’t imagine anyone buying a Tesla after driving one of these.”

Jo Borras/TTAC.com

WHY WOULD YOU

Mercedes-Benz claims the new EQS 580 4MATIC sedan will sprint from 0-60 mph in just 4.1 seconds, thanks to the 516 horsepower and 631 lb-ft of combined torque available from its Dual Permanently Excited Synchronous Motors (PSMs). I tell you that I am no stranger to fast Mercedes, so believe me when I tell you that the 580 feels even quicker than that. It wasn’t the cars’ straight-line speed or instant-on handling at the flip of a switch tap of the screen nature that were most impressive to me, though, having just spent three days in an equally quick dual-motor Tesla Model 3. It was the quality of the thing.

Jo Borras/TTAC.com

Despite the fact that these EQSs were early production cars – I’d never seen one in person, prior to arriving at the Electrify Expo Industry Day in Austin – it’s clear that Mercedes-Benz has laser-focused its attention on Tesla’s quality control issues and decided to launch an attack on Elon’s young carmaker on that front.

Jo Borras/TTAC.com

They’ve scored a direct hit. Everywhere you look on the big Benz, you see the attention to detail and focus. The shut lines are uniform. The doors, fenders, and hood all perfectly aligned. Inside, all the pieces fit as they should. Mold lines are invisible. Leather, MB-Tex, recycled carpets, glass, and aluminum all come together as designed, without a stitch or seam out of place. Shut the door hard in the Benz, and that sound, too, is utterly satisfying – something I couldn’t say of the Model 3.

And, I know – the base Model 3 is about a third of the price of the $130,000-plus EQS 580 4MATIC I drove, and a better comparison would probably be the $129,990 Model S Plaid. I’d be inclined to agree with you, except that I’m trying to give Tesla a chance here.

BRAND NEW MODEL S PLAID – QUALITY ISSUES

In contrast, none of the EQSs I had to choose from had any of those issues. The paint on the darker colored cars, in typical Mercedes fashion, was a bit orange-peely, but it was deep and rich with a heavy flake and lots of flop. What’s more, there wasn’t a single panel on any of the Mercedes that you could say needed a re-spray. The rocker panels and wheel well liners fit snugly, and those wheel wells were filled nicely by aerodynamic wheels on both models.

ELON’S INFLUENCE ON THE WORLD’S CLASSIEST HOT HATCH

You might think that the biggest influence the Tesla Model S had on the new Mercedes-Benz EQS has something to do with the fact that it’s electric, or that it has features and capabilities that, as on the Tesla, are software-locked. Heck, it’s not even the “vegan leather” option. You could make a good case for any of those things, but I’m saying it’s this …

… that’s right, kids – the all-new, all-electric, flagship Mercedes-Benz EQS 580 4MATIC sedan is, for the first time in Mercedes history, a hatchback.

A hatchback, just like the Tesla Model S.

Jo Borras/TTAC.com

Say what you will about Tesla and Elon Musk (I know I have), but you have to hand it to the guy. He made the Teutonic titans at Mercedes-Benz question themselves so deeply, and so profoundly, that in addition to more-or-less making the electric = premium equation balance out almost entirely on his own, he got Mercedes-Benz to turn the S class into the world’s classiest hatchback.

Bruno Sacco is spinning in his grave (if he’s dead – I didn’t look it up). Ed. note – I looked it up and he is very much alive.

Jo Borras/TTAC.com

JUST ABOUT PERFECT

In the end, I may be the only person who finds the hatchback Benz thing funny – and that’s fine. The reality is that the new Mercedes EQS sedans, both of them, are incredibly well-conceived automobiles. They’re quiet, solid, fast, and can tailor themselves to their drivers’ wants and needs in just about real time. For example, to adjust my seat, I entered my height. It weighed me, I think, then adjusted my seat accordingly. The computer got my very nearly into my preferred seating position on the first try. Even the massaging seat rollers (of course it has massaging seats) seemed to know where they were wanted.

Jo Borras/TTAC.com

It’s hard to argue against the thing. And, no – it’ll never handle like an E30 BMW, or even a Polestar 2 – but I’d bet the new grosser could hold its own against anything this side of an Alpina B7. Until BMW has something electric in this size class, though, I think the EQS stands alone.

[Images © 2021 Jo Borras/TTAC.com, Timothy Cain/TTAC.com]

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86 Comments on “2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 450+ and 580 4MATIC First Drives – Tesla Beaters...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “They’ve scored a direct hit. Everywhere you look on the big Benz, you see the attention to detail and focus.”

    The detail on the interior resembling something I may have seen at Disneyworld in 1992. There is nothing about it that says Mercedes, its a fricking joke. They let CLA’s chintz gobble up the whole company… and the snobs attack Tesla’s equally poor interiors.

    Making matters worse the exterior styling is bland and forgettable, did someone not inform them the blob look isn’t important if you’re not under the thumb of CARB? You can actually do something unique here because you *are* the electric powered vehicle demanded by our social betters, but you thought yes let’s go for slug! I haven’t had command of a W126 in more years than I can remember but I sort of want to grab one so I can point at the losers who fork out over a hundred grand for this POS and mouth through the glass “This is a Mercedes, dumbass!”.

    Lord Musk is still very much winning if this is the best you can do Daimler.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Wait, I have more.

      “… that’s right, kids – the all-new, all-electric, flagship Mercedes-Benz EQS 580 4MATIC sedan is, for the first time in Mercedes history, a hatchback.

      A hatchback, just like the Tesla Model S.”

      I don’t know enough about Tesla to know why they made that choice, but somehow it works for it – probably because it was *first*. Guess what Daimler? ***It doesn’t work for you***. Oh cool so lets let go of whatever dignity we still had and just *copy* the market *creator*. You don’t get admiration, you make yourself the “dollar store” near equivalent and it impresses no one. It sounds like the only thing you didn’t screw up Daimler was the drivetrain, will that be enough? Perhaps, or perhaps Germany’s ELR is on its way.

      • 0 avatar

        I had a Saab 900, then a 9-3. A “hatchback” isn’t a bad thing, I don’t get the hate, other than it was code for cheap cars back in the era when GM sold 50% of all the cars in the US. Hatchback allows you to carry cargo-oh wait we are American so require an Escalade for that…right.

      • 0 avatar
        kjhkjlhkjhkljh kljhjkhjklhkjh

        Blame the market .. Everyone but us wants a Crossover, SUV, minisuv, minivan, high riding whatever the the crap you call the fiat500x and Mini-clubman (ew) .. Everyone seems done with low to the ground sedans unless the price is cheap, or they like something that doesn’t handle like a pregnant yak.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think you can make some very valid criticisms of this model, but this is NOT going to remind anyone of a CLA, particularly once they climb in. It looks extremely well sorted to me.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Don’t get the hate. You can see even from the pictures that the interior materials are S-Class grade and much different from the early CLAs. We may not love the MOAR SCREEN trend but it’s clearly what’s animating the customers at this moment. If this thing runs into trouble it’s going to be because people aren’t ready for the return of the blob, not because it’s chintzy.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Its a joke and it will run into trouble not only because it lacks panache but also because Tesla is the market leader. Something like this at a Model 3 price point may sadly have a shot but this doesn’t at $130K. Just line it up besides a Model S, its the cool kids vs the sad misunderstood ones.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          You seem very set on believing this, but literally everyone, including TTAC, has said that the EQS interior is a knockout and that build quality is light years beyond anything offered by Tesla. Your opinion based on press photos is yours, but that’s all it is.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree, and you have fun in your $130K taxi because that’s what it looks like at best. I am not a particular fan of Tesla but the Model S has sexy lines, this is completely uninspired.

          • 0 avatar
            Mike A

            Always some contrarian and that is 28 cars. Why buy the model S (sale already down 75% from a few years ago) when you can have the Tacan/e trim GT, the EQS or the Lucid Air. All excellent in their own ways and superior in many ways to the aging, low quality S.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Well Mike, I have seen the S and its got nice lines while this thing goes out of its way to not have them. I really don’t like the giant LED and whatever is supposed to be the steering wheel on the S, but otherwise I think its interior is attractive (as shown in video). I look at the EQS interior and while the quality of materials is likely excellent the Space Mountain setup they have chosen doesn’t inspire confidence for the high entry fee. They are at a price point where they could do nearly anything with this and they seem to have just taken common responses from focus groups and put it all together.

            Mercedes should be able to do better than the-already-existing-for-years S but they seem to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory in things other than drivetrain/engineering, visibility, road feel etc. which I cannot comment upon. Perhaps the Taycan or Air would be better choices than S, I don’t know much about them, but between it and the EQS as shown its S all the way.

          • 0 avatar
            N8iveVA

            In NoVa I see Model S’s quite frequently and after near what, 10 years (?) of pretty much the same car I grew tired of the lines about 4 years ago.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @N8iveVA

            Well if this is any indication of what Lucid et al are going to be doing, I hope you like no lines instead of dated ones.

    • 0 avatar

      Yeah, it looks like scaled up CLA. Is it front wheel drive too?

    • 0 avatar
      orkinp99

      I own both a tesla Y and a Mercedes A. I saw the EQS on display at a mall near where I live. The EQS is over $110,000 and the Y is around 60. This is a feel for Mercedes: to connect to electricity you manually open the gas panel in the car just like any other. In the Y, you aim the nozzle at the car, push a hidden button and a motorized panel pops open. To bring the car into your garage, the system finds your garage door and automatically opens it when coming in and closes it when leaving. Now THAT is attention to detail and the Y is half the price of the MB.

    • 0 avatar
      orkinp99

      I own both a tesla Y and a Mercedes A. I saw the EQS on display at a mall near where I live. The EQS is over $110,000 and the Y is around 60. This is a feel for Mercedes: to connect to electricity you manually open the gas panel in the car just like any other. In the Y, you aim the nozzle at the car, push a hidden button and a motorized panel pops open. To bring the car into your garage, the system finds your garage door and automatically opens it when coming in and closes it when leaving. Now THAT is attention to detail and the Y is half the price of the MB.

  • avatar
    Syke

    This looks very interesting. However, there’s the big question: Can they get the dealers to take it seriously and actually try and sell the cars? This has been the big problem regarding EV’s and the legacy automakers. Their dealers.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I’ve read anecdotally the Porsche EV was so successful the dealers asked for more models, in theory the same could happen.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Please don’t say that. If this flops, the fallout is going to be hard and deep. Think of the children, like Greta Thunberg. I think people are really responding to the environmental hysteria.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “I think people are really responding to the environmental hysteria.”

        I do hate to be a nihilist but I’m really getting to the point where societal collapse which will result in The Stand plus 5% is welcome. Fake hysteria, fake news, fake websites, fake video/images, fake phones, fake emotions, fake physical appearances. So tired of all of the lies.

        If any of it was real there would not have been 400 or so private jets at COP26. No one was able to jet pool, or omg fly commercial? Really? Its just right in your face how they don’t care and their propaganda is a lie.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          Note that I said responding to it. Not responding to it positively!

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “If any of it was real there would not have been 400 or so private jets at COP26. No one was able to jet pool, or omg fly commercial?”

          And what if they had done exactly what you wanted – would you think it’s a real problem then? My guess is that you wouldn’t.

          Flying private jets isn’t going to make the problem any more or less existent.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Do as I say, not as I do shows the level of concern these people have. If they hold it in contempt either its not an issue or it is an issue but the people pushing this don’t take it seriously so why should anyone else?

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            The message they send by flying private is not a good one. In the big picture of actual impact it is meaningless but not walking the walk gives those who stick their head in the sand more ammunition.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I agree – bad optics. But then again, that’s like saying “FDR should have taken a troop ship to his meeting with Churchill and Stalin and because he didn’t, it showed WWII wasn’t worth fighting.”

            Either the problem is real or it isn’t, and this one is. Quibbling over how our elected leaders live the high life isn’t going to solve the problem. It’s just a straw man.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            “Flying private jets isn’t going to make the problem any more or less existent.”

            Unless you’re going to say our betters should be able to fly individually on polluting private jets to an Environmental summit being held during a “Climate Crisis,” then it’s a bad look.

            Now, you might take the former position, which is fine, I guess, but you’d probably struggle to rationalize it if pressed, and I hope you can see why there’s now so much backlash against elite and ruling classes in general. Seems like many of them have taken to virtue signaling, which attempts are normally laughable.

            Personally, I think it’s a big problem and really didn’t like it much. But that’s just IMO.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @superdessucke:

            By the same logic:

            1) If the president cared about high food prices, he’d go shopping at the local grocery store and pay out of pocket for it like the rest of us.

            2) If the president cared about the care at VA hospitals, he’d have all his medical care done at one.

            In this case, the real questions are a) whether the president is actually doing anything about high food prices, or b) whether the president is doing anything about care at VA hospitals. In both cases, wouldn’t you say the real test is whether the problems in question are actually being solved, versus the optics? I would.

            Saying the president – or any leader – has to ‘walk the walk’ all the time, on every issue, is basically a straw man. We know they don’t live the way we do.

            In fact, if those leaders DID fly commercial to the meeting, I bet many of the same people who are making the “they don’t walk the walk” argument would then accuse them of staging a fake-populist publicity stunt. It’s a no-win.

            In the end, I judge them on whether they’re actually tackling the problems they’re tasked with tackling, versus doing it with the optics I’d prefer to see.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @golden2husky

            “In the big picture of actual impact it is meaningless”

            Perhaps, but so was Dieselgate yet there you’d think the charges were war crimes. Can’t have it both ways.

            @Freed

            “Quibbling over how our elected leaders live the high life isn’t going to solve the problem”

            Maybe there is no problem, or perhaps there is but they are well aware nothing can be done about it so live it up while you can? Except for everyone else of course.

            “has to ‘walk the walk’ all the time, on every issue, is basically a straw man. ”

            No, its not. You could make the argument certain heads of state have a larger entourage and require addition security, thus “walking the wall” isn’t feasible – that’s reasonable. But there were something like 400 jets for I don’t even know how many people. How many of those can “walk the walk” but simply are not held accountable? Perhaps the message is simply, we are the 0.1% and we do as we please, but you are peasantry. That is certainly how everything has been shaping up since 1/1/20.

            “I judge them on whether they’re actually tackling the problems they’re tasked with tackling”

            Their job is to create problems, not solve them.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            @FreedMike – I suppose that makes some sense though most people ascribe to the “lead by example” philosophy. Trump had a lot of good policies too but his negative personality flaws and optics of his words and deeds completely overshadowed them. And the media let everyone know it.

            So the optics of this are bad And we have seemingly biased coverage that’s being given to it, or not given to it. It gives the impression these leaders are untouchable royalty.

            The public is being asked to make sacrifices in the name of the Climate Crisis, and that ask will intensify. And then you have that optic, which to some seems to be saying “rules for thee and not for me.” It’s a bad look that is going to cause a lot of problems in the future, and undermine the cause, which should be a concern if you believe in environmental measures to address climate change (as I do FWIW).

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            I mean put another way, you need to want to follow leaders. Who honestly wants to follow a bunch of elitists who fly to climate summits on private jets and try to tell the rest of us how to live? I mean, I’m not saying that’s the right view point but obviously it’s one which is being taken by many.

  • avatar
    watersketch

    I’ve been waiting for a car to put the lift gate so high that it is unreachable for a manual close – looks like MB has done it. Now I just need a taller garage!

  • avatar
    jmo2

    A Model S Plaid is more than twice as fast. The base Model S is $90k and 0.6 seconds faster. The Mercedes is a lot slower and $40k more expensive than a Model S with similar performance.

    I think the biggest issue here is pricing, second is styling, third is performance and fourth – you’re a 36 year old who just made VP and you’re on the market for a top of the range sedan – the Tesla brand is far less geriatric than Mercedes.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      “The base Model S is $90k and 0.6 seconds faster. The Mercedes is a lot slower and $40k more expensive than a Model S with similar performance.”

      Sure, but a Hellcat is a second quicker through the quarter than an S580 and it hasn’t stopped Mercedes from selling plenty of them. This isn’t an AMG model, it’s a luxury sedan – which provides a hell of a lot more luxury than the Tesla. It’s not like anyone is actually tracking these cars.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo2

        A Hellcat isn’t a top of the range luxury car. A Model S is.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Rolls and Bentley would like a word.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          Says who? Certainly not the interior, the fit and finish, or the customer service experience. Why do you think the only determining matter is straight-line acceleration?

          • 0 avatar
            jmo2

            The customer service experience especially the purchasing process is exception. What are you referring to?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @jmo:

            Watch the video Jo posted, where Tesla delivered a dirty car with any number of quality problems to a buyer. His story isn’t unique.

            None of that would be acceptable on a $18,000 Hyundai Accent, and certainly NOT acceptable on a $100,000 + luxury car.

            I get that you’re a fan of the brand, and I get that there are things they do incredibly well, but they need to clean up their act.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “where Tesla delivered a dirty car with any number of quality problems to a buyer.”

            Yet sales continue to grow 100% year over year and their customer satisfaction ratings are sky high. Interesting…

            I wonder how much of it is due to Tesla owning the problem? I’ve heard anecdotally that a Honda dealer’s go to is – “Honda’s don’t break. You must have broken it.” Whereas I’ve heard, again anecdotally, that Tesla is really good about resolving any issues you might have.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @jmo:
            “Customers don’t see to care about our quality issues because sales are increasing year over year…”

            Same thing Cadillac was saying…in 1968.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Freed

            That was true on Earth, but this is Planet Brawndo now and Tesla’s got what plants crave.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @28:

            Tesla is Brawndo because it doesn’t have much competition. Well, that’s changing.

      • 0 avatar

        You have to compare S-Klasse with Imperial not Dodge. Corey knows the answer.

    • 0 avatar

      “… the Tesla brand is far less geriatric than Mercedes.”

      This is a great point, but hard to quantify. I’ll say this in Mercedes’ defense: it passes the Sigourney Weaver test. It might pass the Molly Ringwald test, too, for someone closer to my age. The Tesla? Definitely a younger generation’s car.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I think Mercedes has plenty of cred among luxury car buyers. In fact, I’d say plenty of them who bought Teslas would have bought a Mercedes EV had one been made. Well, now one is. And I bet there’s no shortage of current Tesla buyers who will at least look at this.

        This car won’t kill Model S or Tesla sales, but it doesn’t have to – this is about building the brand’s EV business. And I think going about it from the “top down” is a smart move.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Let’s be honest: no one 36 is buying sedans. The sedan category is for older buyers and both Mercedes and Tesla are perfectly aware of that. The vehicles that will matter to the 36-year-old who just had a liquidity event are big SUVs and trucks. So far the big SUVs just aren’t there yet and the trucks are just starting to appear. The vehicle Mercedes better hit out of the park for these buyers is the EQG, coming in a couple of years.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Do the wheels on the black car still have some kind of shipping protection on them or something?

    If not, they are a crime against humanity.

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Those are for oreodynamics and are dunkable. The car looks like an Audi take on the original Pontiac G6. But it’s acually Sensual Purity 2.0, the delusional title MB’s chief designer Gordo der Spritz Wagener awarded his latest bad set of ideas.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      I like ’em. They’d do better to ditch the 5 spokes and go full mesh-effect, though.

  • avatar
    jmo2

    I was also just watching Jay Leno testing the new Model S where they took it to a drag strip and broke the record for the fastest quarter mile by a production car. It beat the previous record holder the Bugatti Chiron Super Sport. In terms of our newly longed 46 year old executive – having the fastest car ever…that’s the ultimate bragging right.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      That’s great. But how usable is that kind of speed on the street? I mean, I drive a Jetta GLI, and using launch control, this it’s a 5.6 to 60/14 second quarter mile car. I get to use all of that straight line performance MAYBE 15-20% of the time.

      Meanwhile, the Plaid is still a Tesla, which means it’s a six-figure car that’s built about as well as a Nissan Altima (and I’m being charitable there).

      We’ve had this argument before, but quality matters to people who are buying expensive cars. The reason Tesla has been able to get away with its’ crummy quality has been zero competition. That’s changing. Not everyone who’s in the market for a car like this will opt for the Mercedes, but many of them will.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        How often does your average Wrangler go off road? How often is there anything in the bed of a pickup? Cars sell on more than pure practicality.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yes, they do, and one of those things is quality, which is particularly important to luxury car buyers.

          Ask the folks at Jaguar, Lincoln, Cadillac or Alfa Romeo what happens when your quality rep goes down the drain.

        • 0 avatar
          Mike A

          Does the plaid need 60 minutes to condition the battery to do the alleged 2s run, whereas the Taycan can do the 2.5s dash continually. If that is all Tesla can now run on (Luic more efficient and longer range, any other model better built etc) then that explains why S sales are so low compared to just a few years ago and not recovering.

      • 0 avatar
        stodge

        Built like an Altima with sponges for brake pads.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    I’ll never shop this price point, but from down here in plebekistan it looks glorious. I’m not sure how fast an executive saloon needs to run the quarter. Not my main metric. Downright sick of idiots drag racing the 720s like that’s what it’s good at.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “The shut lines are uniform. The doors, fenders, and hood all perfectly aligned. Inside, all the pieces fit as they should. Mold lines are invisible. Leather, MB-Tex, recycled carpets, glass, and aluminum all come together as designed, without a stitch or seam out of place. Shut the door hard in the Benz, and that sound, too, is utterly satisfying – something I couldn’t say of the Model 3.”

    You don’t need to look to Mercedes for that. One of the many reasons I chose my Hyundai Ioniq EV over the Model 3 was its build quality. Other cheaper EVs are also built well.

    However, I’m not convinced that’s enough to sway most people away from Tesla, who is already on pace to surpass M-B’s US sales soon. They’ll need more than the beautiful EQS to rock Tesla’s boat. Besides, a “Tesla beater” needs to be built in volume, and M-B isn’t prepared for that.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Also stolen from Telas – huge screen / no buttons. The entire dash (all 56″ of it) and center console is one huge piece of glass with three separate touch screens including one for the passenger. The whole glass cockpit thing is the way forward no matter how much people complain about it.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “The whole glass cockpit thing is the way forward”

      But why?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Glass cockpit implies visibility, and well we both know that’s not happening.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @ajla: Touch screens are cheaper and more reliable than mechanical buttons. It’s free to include more touch points, and you’d still need to update code even if you only added mechanical buttons.

        The first big leap on this was the Model S screen back in 2012. Another advantage of the touch screens is the ability to reprogram and even relocate the touch points with a code update. I believe the Model 3 took this to the extreme solely to save money.

        I hate it, just like most people. I think mfrs figure that everyone is already used to such an interface on their smart phones, but they forget that tactile feedback is a useful part of the driving experience. Of course, they’re also working hard to eliminate the driving experience….

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “Touch screens are cheaper”

          It’s a $100k+ car though. I can (somewhat) forgive “we had to make everything a screen to save money” when it comes to a $30K GTI but on an “S-Class” that’s kind of weak.
          This also interestingly implies that the interior on a Charger SXT or Colorado Work Truck actually costs its manufacturer a premium vs uniscreen interfaces in a Model 3.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            “This also interestingly implies that the interior on a Charger SXT or Colorado Work Truck actually costs its manufacturer a premium vs uniscreen interfaces in a Model 3.”

            I’d guarantee it.

            Those vehicles have margin, while the Model 3 scrimped everywhere to try to make Tesla a profit someday.

            Besides, I’m sure you’ve noticed that every vehicle’s dash is losing buttons. Some mfrs have realized that losing certain buttons will also lose them customers, so perhaps this evolution will reach a limit.

          • 0 avatar
            Ol Shel

            Touch screens are ‘cool’. People want ‘cool’, no matter how much worse it is.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “Touch screens are cheaper and more reliable than mechanical buttons”

          Point taken on cheaper, but touch phones demonstrate the opposite on “reliable”.

  • avatar
    Rick T.

    First impression of the grey car in the top photo is some Chevy model.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    My only reservation is the styling, which I’m not wild about. But competition can’t come too soon for Tesla.

  • avatar
    swester

    WTF is Mercedes thinking with this? Honestly, this is an embarrassing effort from every perspective.

    I recently saw one in a special showroom in NYC, and it somehow looks even worse and less impressive in person.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Mercedes has lost it. If you want a real Mercedes go back to Bruno Sacco era. This cheap Korean car imitation seems lost. Porsche Taycan showed one can design a beautiful electric. The sister Audi e-Tron is also beautiful.

    This Mercedes is an abomination. I take a Tesla model S over this any day. Interior is cheap. Exterior is like 2 week old soap in a Turkish bath. Sad sad Mercedes junk. Pass.

  • avatar
    ltcmgm78

    Well, I think the market will decide, won’t it? If you have a lot of dough to spend on an EV, you will probably check out the Lucid and the Mercedes products and compare them to the Teslas. Tesla could position itself as a more reasonably priced EV with great styling and see how it goes. I have no dog in the fight. I would never pay what they’re asking for any of these vehicles. Call me when the $30,000 EV shows up with 300 miles of range!

    • 0 avatar
      swester

      You could have picked up a loaded Chevy Bolt last year for the mid-$20s. 300 miles of range easily. And a decent little package, too, aside from the whole battery recall thing…

  • avatar
    ajla

    This is my favorite EV because it is just a Genesis G80 with a battery.

    genesis.com/us/en/2023/genesis-electrifiedg80.html

  • avatar
    el scotto

    100K for your ride puts you in some rarified air. You’re not worried if you can fit a 96-pack of toilet paper in your trunk. When you buy n this league, you’re hoping to project an image.

    Confused about all this? The B&B is a raucous, opinionated, and varied lot. For 7 large you can have an exact copy of the Tour de France winners bicycle, or a custom firearm of your choice, or a bleeding-edge computer under your desk. When you’re spending that much money you get exactly what you want.

    100K vehicles are luxury vehicles. I’d take a dark blue, tan interior, Lexus “air scarf” for 100K. There are many on here who would challenge me to a steel cage death match to defend their 100K decision. At his point, you’ve reached a point that if a normal person listened in on an LC vs Corvette vs Cayman argument, they’d want to slap all the involved parties.

    At 100K you’ve entered Corneliani vs Gieves and Hawkes vs Brooks Brothers Golden Fleece suits argument. Most people don’t care as long as Jos A Banks and The Men’s Warehouse are in business.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      For a hundred grand, you could buy a restored classic car or truck and have it converted to electric, and have enough cash left over to cover your roof with solar panels to power your car AND your home. (Do it while you are still young enough to!)
      Not only that, you’d be driving a dream car that means something special to you, instead of the latest trendy fad that will be surpassed and obsolete in five years.
      Tesla is already getting passed up. Electric technology is advancing at near-warp speed. Even this new MB will be as modern as an old Beetle in ten or fifteen years time.

  • avatar
    dusterdude

    Based on that exterior it looks like Daimler designers were inspired by the Chevy Malibu ?

  • avatar

    Mercedes is the Tesla of 19 century.
    Mercedes is the Tesla of ICE cars.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    – This is a good writeup.

    – Opinion: M-B has unfortunate naming, all the way from ‘M-B’ to the model designations and the Many Numbers to the ‘4MATIC’ naming.

    – Fifth picture (the wheel): That’s not how you use a Logo (if you still care about your Brand).

    – If you must use touchscreens, the “‘zero-layer’ menu concept” (see the link below) appeals to me. (It looks like they have ‘replicated’ the old physical buttons on the touchscreen and they stay there all the time.) [My fundamental aversion to glass screens for vehicle controls remains, because you are bouncing around in three axes and have no place to brace your hand to hit the little part of the screen that feels like every other part of the screen, and you have to use your eyes in the process, meanwhile Real Life (and/or Death) is happening outside your vehicle.]

    – @Jo, you say that a human female gave you useful driving advice – are we sure?

    – Whatever you do, do not go to this link and watch the beginning of the “aesthetics of kinetics” section where the individual presses the button on the center console:
    https://www.mbusa.com/en/vehicles/class/eqs/sedan

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    $130,000 car is nice.

    In other news, water is wet.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Good lord 130K for something that looks like it would fit in at any Asian car dealer for around 35-40K. No thanks Mercedes. If this is the best these so called luxury marques can pen out car styling is truly dead!

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