By on October 20, 2021

2022 Honda Civic Hatchback

We’ve covered the Civic sedan on these digital pages in the past, noting improvements in several areas over its predecessor save for one detail – a manual transmission. Honda gets it right with the ’22 hatch variant, offering a six-speed stick in this body style.

Sure, the build-n-price tool isn’t officially live on Honda’s site as of this writing but there’s no lack of information about this model on their media site. Which is the best bang for your Honda hatchback buck?

It goes without saying we’ll be selecting a trim in which the 6MT is available, limiting us to Sport or Sport Touring options. The most obvious difference between these two is under the hood: The former gets a 2.0-liter four-banger good for 158 horsepower while the latter finds a 1.5-liter Turbo capable of belting out 180 ponies between its front fenders. While 22 horses might not seem like much of a boost, torque jumps from 138 to 177 lb-ft of twist, all of which comes online at just 1,700 rpm – about 2,500 rpm sooner than the naturally aspirated mill. In short, the turbo feels a lot sprightlier than its on-paper stats may suggest.

That extra power comes at a cost, with the Sport Touring showing a sticker of $29,400 which is a $5,300 walk from the non-turbo Sport. Interestingly, the six-speed is no less (or more) expensive than the automatic, though the CVT’s ability to game EPA’s fuel economy tests pays off in the form of an extra 3 mpg in town.

Honda gives Sport Touring customers more for their money than just power, of course. The more expensive trim also adds a Bose premium audio system, a bigger infotainment touchscreen, that dandy 10.2-inch digital gauge cluster Honda is starting to install in everything they make, and more USB charging ports for your friends.

2022 Honda Civic Hatchback

Still, it’s not like the non-Turbo has a wasteland interior. Look for Apple CarPlay and Android Auto in the 7-inch center stack screen, 8-speaker audio system, leather-wrapped touchpoints, and a push-button one can thumb to light the fires. One does give up a couple of safety nannies, like rear cross-traffic alert, but the headlamps remain LED peepers. Besides, you’re supposed to be paying attention while reversing – right? All Civic hatchbacks include features like lane-keeping.

Speed costs money, how fast do you want to go? Every racer in America has that mantra etched into the walls of their shop, or at least scrawled into the top of their toolbox. Five grand is no small consideration at this end of the price spectrum; representing 22 percent of the non-turbo Sport’s price, it’s like adding $12,000 to the price of an F-150 Lariat SuperCrew 4×4.

But the allure of speed beckons. And if anyone questions your choice of the turbo, just tell them there’s a better chance of recouping a higher percentage of value at trade-in time.

Please note the prices listed here are in United States dollars and are currently accurate for base prices exclusive of any fees, taxes, or rebates. Your dealer may (and should) sell for less (obscene market conditions notwithstanding). Keep your foot down, bone up on available rebates, and bargain hard.

[Images: Honda]

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13 Comments on “The Right Spec: 2022 Honda Civic Hatchback...”


  • avatar
    kcflyer

    I would be torn if I had to pick a Civic to replace my EXT manual. I would love to get the new SI in that Orange color but it doesn’t have much more power than the other Turbo 1.5 and it does not look like the seats are ventilated. So a sport touring makes more sense options wise but stupid Honda once again says if you want a sport touring with a manual transmission it’s only available in white, black or silver. Same stupid people that said if you wanted a two door accord with a manual it had to be a boring color. I don’t understand the logic that says lets offer an enthusiast model but in boring non colors. Don’t all these cars go down the same assemble line? So why not offer all available colors on all models? And don’t get me started on the all black interiors. C’mon Honda.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      The lack of colors makes sense if you ever watch a YouTube video of a Honda factory. Apparently to make the paint process go smoother, they group production by paint color, one after the other. I’d be willing to bet they also group them by trim and option package. (This makes “sequencing” parts for the assemblers easier; it’s simpler to just drop off a couple pallets of the same parts vs. coordinating single parts specific for different trims.)

      Honda can get away with this because they offer so few factory option packages; you get to pick your trim and your color, and that’s about it. Everything else is installed by the dealer.

  • avatar
    Tirpitz

    Build tool is live on Honda’s site-
    https://automobiles.honda.com/tools/build-and-price-trimwalk?modelseries=civic-hatchback&modelyear=2022

    If I was getting one I’d stick with the natural aspirated motor because sadly I don’t trust the Honda turbo after the oil dilution problems. But rather than buy a Civic I’ve put down an order for a hybrid Ford Maverick XLT. Probably waiting 4-6 months for that. In the meantime I’ll get to see what new Integra will be like and see if I want to turn down the Ford in favor of the Acura.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve Biro

      “If I was getting one I’d stick with the natural aspirated motor because sadly I don’t trust the Honda turbo after the oil dilution problems. But rather than buy a Civic I’ve put down an order for a hybrid Ford Maverick XLT. Probably waiting 4-6 months for that. In the meantime I’ll get to see what new Integra will be like and see if I want to turn down the Ford in favor of the Acura.”

      +10 This — all of it — is the perfect summation of how I feel right now. Except I have yet to order a Maverick. We can’t be the only ones who feel this way.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        That’s a solid strategy. I like the si, but I could do without the ridiculous rear spoiler. Makes me curious about the Integra.

        I really like the Maverick too. I hope Ford can figure out how to add AWD to the hybrid.

  • avatar
    ajla

    The reviews seem positive but the Sport Touring hatchback is $30,810 with destination so it f*cking better be nice.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Sport in boost blue, then swap in a K24A2 so it could act like a Honda.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    158HP from 2.0 liters of sweet Honda 4-cylinder engine will be your faithful companion for as long as you care to drive it and plenty powerful enough to satisfy. And you’ll save like 5 grand.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I’ll take an Si sedan in the $27k range over any trim of the hatchback.

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