By on July 20, 2021

Despite American carmakers and the United Auto Workers abandoning mask mandates at the end of June, there’s been an about-face in Wentzville, Missouri. The state witnessed an uptick of cases, encouraging both the UAW and General Motors to reintroduce masks and social distancing protocols.

The facility is responsible for the GMC Canyon and Colorado, as well as Chevrolet’s Savana and Express. It’s also likely to be the first facility of many we’re assuming will be told it’s time to go back to the old masking rules. But why is this happening so soon after everyone was given the green light to return to normal operations? 

According to a safety alert intercepted by The Detroit Free Press, Wentzville staffers were informed of the changes on Monday. While temperature checks will not be returning, employees (even those that have been vaccinated) will be required to wear masks to do their job.

“We have been informed by the company and UAW International that based on the severe upward trend of COVID cases in the surrounding areas all GM Wentzville Assembly Center employees will be once again required to wear masks upon entering the plant starting tonight with third shift employees,” states the alert.

But the “severe upward trend of COVID cases” isn’t as dire as one might assume. The New York Times has kept a running tally of cases and deaths between states. Missouri’s death rates really aren’t any worse than they were in May when everyone decided it was time to consider dropping safety protocols. Weekly averages from July represent fatalities in the single digits or low teens, which is practically identical to what we saw in June.

But new cases have increased, with the state seeing infections double among both the vaccinated and unvaccinated over the last several weeks. Averages remain smaller than they were over the cold weather months. But the spike has spooked quadrants of business and the government, especially since those new cases include both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. The good news is that severe cases are pretty rare across the board, with fatalities being a minuscule representation of the whole. Unfortunately, this doesn’t seem to have prevented leadership from restoring prohibitive measures nobody on the ground seems overly fond of.

That said, Missouri’s infection rates are a bit higher than the national average. Some are undoubtedly hoping that these health and safety protocols will be a temporary, isolated matter. But we’ve seen California beginning to signal that it’s considering mandatory statewide masking after witnessing a similar uptick in new cases. Experts are blaming the delta variant of COVID-19 — which has the same great taste but is less filling.

While there’s been some debate on its severity, the overall effectiveness of vaccinations, and the general utility of masking, officials believe it’s likely more contagious and remain steadfast that increasing vaccinations and deploying social distancing measures remain the best solutions. We’re not sure how this one progresses but are doubting this will be the last time you read about safety restrictions and evolving factory protocols.

[Image: Miljan Zivkovic/Shutterstock]

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87 Comments on “UAW and General Motors Are Backing Mask Mandates Again...”


  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    considering the certain group of idiots that think they will become magnetized or that chips are made of liquid and can be implanted? those folks wont be missed. we are back to masks indoors too, but it seems like this might finally be the last “wave”

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Going back to masks seems like a sensible precaution, given the stalled vaccination rate and the transmissibility of Delta.

      The numbers say another surge is starting, and we’re already seeing exponential growth (again).

      Thanks for extending the plague, anti-vaxxers. [facepalm]

      • 0 avatar
        khory

        Why? Let them get it if they want. Vax up if you want and go about your business.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          @khory,
          “Let them get it if they want.”

          The majority of the people living in my household are under 12 years old, and aren’t yet eligible for the vaccine. Letting nature take its course with the unvaccinated is a negative outcome for my unvaccinated family members, even though COVID is less bad when you’re a kid. Being less-bad doesn’t mean you *want* to get it, and being less bad doesn’t mean that getting COVID won’t cause long-term health problems for kids who do get it (as it does for many of the adults who get it).

          When you combine this with the stalled vaccination campaign, the rollback of mask-mandates, and the mandated school re-openings, unvaccinated adults are a threat to my family, and are treated as such. At least until my kids can be vaccinated.

          Yeah, once my kids can be vaccinated, I’ll be able to chill out and just let nature take its course with the anti-vaxxers — even though that’s far from an ideal outcome for our community and our nation as a whole. Until then, though, COVID mitigation is a community effort — and the anti-vaxxers are ensuring the failure of those efforts.

          We’re in the midst of a WWII-level event (in terms of worldwide body-count), and around half of the United States won’t even follow basic medical and hygiene advice that would end this. And so the plague continues. [facepalm]

          • 0 avatar
            khory

            Alarmism. Kids aren’t any more risk from Covid than they are from anything else. You are doing them a disservice by keeping them in a bubble.

            Ironically, your argument about long term effect of Covid in kids is the same ones anti-vaxers make about the the long term effects of the vaccine.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            “Being less-bad doesn’t mean you *want* to get it”

            Even if you’re a kid.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            “Ironically, your argument about long term effect of Covid in kids is the same ones anti-vaxers make about the the long term effects of the vaccine.”

            Getting the vaccine unironically beats getting COVID, even for a kid. It’s that simple.

            It’s only ironic if you don’t understand risk-balance, and aren’t thinking.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Go ask for a booster, pretty please.

      • 0 avatar
        tomLU86

        Any idea how many Americans under the age of 18 have died from COVID? (Or or had tested positive for COVID before time of death)?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @tomLU86 –
          Total USA COVID-19 deaths: 601,125
          Age 0 – 4 …… 122
          Age 5 – 18 ….. 279

          • 0 avatar
            tomLU86

            Thanks Lou_BC

            Luke42 is worried about his kids–understandably.

            So 400 Americans died of COVID, per Lou. I’ll accept that (I thought is was 230 or 270).

            How many die of influenza or pneumonia per year?

            I’d think more than 400.

            How many under 18 have died after taking the vaccine? Any one here know? I do not.

            But one 13-year old in nearby Saginaw County died less than 3 days after getting the 2nd shot on June 13.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @TomLU86
            In Canada over 41 million doses of the vaccine have been used. There have been a grand total of 134 deaths reported among those who have received the vaccine.

            Meanwhile in the USA 99.2% of cases are among the unvaccinated.

            https://health-infobase.canada.ca/covid-19/vaccine-safety/

            https://www.reuters.com/article/factcheck-vaers-rival-idUSL2N2O01XU

            https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jul/08/fears-of-new-us-covid-surge-as-delta-spreads-and-many-remain-unvaccinated

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @tomLU86 – you can go to the USA CDC site. It breaks out various reported causes of death. The death rate for vaccinated people is rather low. In the range of 5-8 per 1,000 deaths. The remainder i.e. 992-995 are unvaccinated.

            The unvaccinated pool in the USA being very large does increase the risk to those under 18 (and everyone else) simply because there is a large viral load present in the population.

    • 0 avatar

      It is not chips. What they are talking about are nanorobots. It is a new very promising cutting edge technology. Read more about it here:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanorobotics

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Richard Feynman (mentioned in your link) keeps showing up lately. He plays a key role in the “Challenger: The Final Flight” 4-episode series on Netflix [highly recommended]:

        https://www.netflix.com/title/81012137

        [Also ordered his book (“Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!”: Adventures of a Curious Character) recently, but haven’t started it yet.]

        Back to Covid…
        The Premonition: A Pandemic Story by Michael Lewis is an interesting read so far.

        • 0 avatar
          Alex Mackinnon

          That’s because Feynman is famous. Not quite Einstein famous, but certainly a superstar among scientists. He did win 2 nobel prizes after all.

          That’s a great book btw.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Inside Looking Out – thanks for keeping the CooCoo train rolling at FOOL speed ahead!
        A “chip” large enough to be used as a tracker won’t fit through a typical needle and syringe used to deliver vaccine. A 25 gauge needle is 0.5 mm in diameter (externally).
        Nanobots would serve what purpose?
        They would cost trillions for controlling/tracking everyone injected.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      We have now spent more money (yes…adjusted for inflation) “defeating” Covid than winning World War II and you are telling me that for my money I got a plan that hinges on the whims of people that believe there are nanobots being injected into them.

      And you wonder why I bristle when you tell me that I need to pay even more to beat global warming. Hard pass man.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Good thing we defeated terror, drugs, poverty, and the Viet Cong.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          To quote “Born in the USA”

          “Had a brother at Khe Sahn
          Fighting off the Viet Cong
          They’re still there, he’s all gone”

          “They’re still there”… insert anyone of your choosing!

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “Come back home to the refinery…hiring man said son if it was up to me.”

            “Went down to see my VA Man he said Son, don’t ya understand.”

            I love how Politicians play that song at rallys acting like it’s all patriotic though.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Art Vandelay – agreed. It’s a song against the establishment

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          You forgot the Taliban. Yeah, I’ll keep my money and take my chances with the virus, thanks.

        • 0 avatar

          “Good thing we defeated terror, drugs, poverty, and the Viet Cong.”

          There is nothing left to defeat but itself.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          Now, we are defeating racism. Let’s hope that campaign is every bit as successful as the war on drugs, the war on terror (an oxymoron, if there ever was one), and the war on the Viet Cong. Go team!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            All of those wars were lost because one did not deal with the root cause of each. As far as the “Viet Cong”, the US’s post WW2 war on communism and socialism has caused all sorts of collateral problems. Terrorism and poverty being a few.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Silverado in Wentzville?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      There are tons of Silverados in Wentzville. None are made there, though. I think the writer was referring to the GMC Savana.

      I think Chuck Berry’s old restaurant, the Southern Aire, is still in Wentzville too, though I’m sure the video cameras he installed in the ladies’ room have been removed.

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    Well, from the scientific angle, COVID is still around. The delta variant may be bad enough to justify masks even for the vaccinated. I guess it’s a little early to tell at this point?

    Also, from the psychological angle, public health officials held out the promise of unmasking as a carrot to get people to take the vaccine shot. The vaccination rate has now stalled, meaning the holdouts won’t respond to any carrots. So now there’s no longer any point in holding out the carrot.

    From the political angle, if we all take our masks off, how will we know what side we are on? It’s “brand imagery” now. Why get rid of a key brand differentiator so far from mid-term elections? (I know that’s a little pessimistic, but I think there’s some truth in it.)

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Agreed. I’d say I have no idea how doing something simple and easy to protect the public from illness became a political statement, but we all know how that happened – it was the MAGA corps. Naturally, they’ll blame “the libs,” but the fact remains that wearing a mask is a lot like wearing a condom – it’s meant to protect you and others from getting diseases that you may or may not have. Presumably the same folks who are dead set against wearing masks wouldn’t be as dead set against using a condom to have sex with someone they don’t know. But I’m making sense now, aren’t I?

      Of course, a great deal of the MAGA Corps is now dead set against getting the vaccines that Chief MAGA himself, Trump, spent a ka-jillion dollars of THEIR TAX MONEY to develop.

      You can’t make this stuff up.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Not to mention that if the virus keeps the economy down, that will help the Repubs in the midterms. I am sure that is certainly part of the political calculus – make Biden look like he failed with his election promises and run with it. Not sure why that is necessary as there is plenty of real things to criticize Biden for. That, plus keeping the misinformation machine humming is all part of the equation. The fact that some actually think there are “microchips”being injected into every American so they can be tracked by the government is simply astonishing. That is not even necessary – all the “gov’t” would have to do is lean on the cell service providers for all the tracking info they need. Just like Trump’s WH did with with journalists it did not like.

        The irony is that the vast majority of the anti-covid vaccine crowd have their kids vaccinated, wear seat belts and comply with other legally mandated things, yet for covid they let outright lies and misinformation dictate their behavior. And the country collectively will suffer for it. Amazing that science has provided a solution to a global pandemic and America has to bribe citizens to take it. Unreal.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          @Golden I think you are running a little crazy with your conspiracy theories there. That would be like saying the anouncement of the first vaccine 3 days after the election was done to help Democrats.

          Republicans are likely going to run strong on the Economy and law and order during the midterms. It is the one area they still poll well in and it is something that resonates with voters given what they are paying at the grocery store. Putting on a mask or not is secondary to the pinch they are feeling trying to buy some milk and beef.

          For the vaccinated, most barely think about what others are or aren’t doing. Sure, you can still get a mild case and sure, the virus could mutate in the unvaccinated, but the chances of either effecting a vaccinated person in a meaningful manner are slim enough at this point that normal people look at it the same as the myriad of other things that could, but probably won’t kill you that they encounter daily.

          Among the normal, not afraid of everything crowd, most of us got the shot, went back to work (or never left) and are have added this to the list of stuff you just deal with and aren’t really concerned with the anti vaxxers and those of you living in perpetual fear of everything.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Look like?

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “I’d say I have no idea how doing something simple and easy to protect the public from illness became a political statement, but we all know how that happened – it was the MAGA corps.”

        Oops…try again:

        “In September, Harris, then the Democratic Party’s vice-presidential candidate, hesitated when asked if she would take a vaccine that was approved before the election.

        “I will say that I would not trust Donald Trump,” Harris said, “and it would have to be a credible source of information that talks about the efficacy and the reliability of whatever he’s talking about. I will not take his word for it.”

        Cuomo went further, suggesting he mistrusted not just President Donald Trump, but also the Food and Drug Administration under Trump. Asked about his confidence in the FDA, Cuomo indicated he didn’t have much.”

        I gotta figure out how to be a liberal. Ignore facts, history, science and be fully comfortable with lying through your teeth to advance a rabid political agenda. Must be nice to have no morals.

        • 0 avatar
          redapple

          EBFLEX: Inheritor of some of the DEADWEIGHT hate.
          But.

          YOu are spot on more often than not.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “YOu are spot on more often than not.”

            LOL

            A broken clock is correct twice a day (assuming you run on a standard 12 hour time piece).

            I’m not sure what reality let alone timeline that fellow follows.

            I suspect that he just says sh!t regardless of factuality because it is meant to rile up anyone that does not fit his version of reality.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @EBFlex:

          Pure deflection. Harris was referring to a vaccine *that hadn’t been developed yet.* The FDA didn’t give provisional approval for the vaccine until three months after that interview. You conveniently left that out, didn’t you?

          And why should she trust the “word” of Trump, who actually asked why Lysol wasn’t being researched as a COVID treatment?

          Nice try, though.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          EBFlex,

          “I gotta figure out how to be a liberal. Ignore facts,”

          Don’t forget to label anyone with reservations about the Covid vaccine as an anti-vaxxer. Don’t even suggest that a lot of them are worried about the safety and efficacy of this SPECIFIC vaccine, not vaccines in general. Don’t even suggest that a lot of the problem stems from the government’s snow storm of contradictory and confusing (mis)information about Covid.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @Old: You seem to ignore the fact that COVID-19 was ‘new’ and therefore medical, healthcare and infectious disease specialists were and are learning about it. So the information was not ‘contradictory’ it was updated as they acquired more knowledge. Something that is a normal part of the scientific process. Most of the misinformation stemmed from the former guy whose prognostications and tweets were almost always wrong/incorrect/faulty.

            As for worries about the vaccine(s). Unfortunately the majority of those publicly ‘worrying’ about their safety were confirmed anti-vaxxers from before the onset of COVID.

            And there are at least 4 COVID vaccines being used. So why capitalize ‘specific’? Two are mRNA vaccines and 2 are ‘old style’. So any logical worry should focus only on two of these vaccines, not all four. But then anti-vaxxers tend to gloss over this fact.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “But why is this happening so soon after everyone was given the green light to return to normal operations?”

    Because as it turns out, the New Confederate States of America decided to tell the rest of the country to go f**k itself and didn’t get vaccinated. That’s about the size of it, Thanks, guys.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Herd immunity is unlikely to occur with SARS-CoV-2. It was initially though to require 70-80% of the population but with variants we are seeing case counts rise even with 70% vaccination rates. The remaining group of unvaccinated population are going to function like a human petri dish. They will be a breeding ground/reservoir for infections.
      Statistically the majority of hospital admissions and deaths have been in unvaccinated people. IIRC that number is 99.5% of current deaths. It is rather unfortunate that this may become Darwinism on a massive scale predominantly along education and political lines.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Slightly off topic…but since this article mentions Wentzville, Missouri, which is right outside St. Louis, I’ll add this interesting little tidbit.

        https://bit.ly/3zwUURd

        It seems that the New Confederate States of Southern Missouri – which anyone who’s from Missouri knows isn’t “New” at all, as the Confederacy never went away anywhere south of St. Louis – seems intent on invading the North once more, sending its’ special Delta COVID army up I-44 to those big bad Yankees in St. Louis and Kansas City. Yee-hah! The South is gonna rise again!

        Delta was SO damn easy to deal with – just get people immunized and it’s a non issue. I just don’t get it. I guess the rightwingnut anti-vax crowd just wants people to die, right after they attend a “march for life”…unmasked, of course.

        You just can’t make this crap up.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    https://www.pnas.org/content/118/4/e2014564118

    Conclusion

    Our review of the literature offers evidence in favor of widespread mask use as source control to reduce community transmission

    Models suggest that public mask wearing is most effective at reducing spread of the virus when compliance is high

    When used in conjunction with widespread testing, contact tracing, quarantining of anyone that may be infected, hand washing, and physical distancing, face masks are a valuable tool to reduce community transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      What kind of freedom-hating commie are you, Lou?

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @FreedMike – one that follows scientific evidence. The usual suspects will be along shortly to ask that same question. LOL

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Right on time, here’s EB below, saying “gee, even people who have the vaccine get the virus, but for some reason the death rate is way down.”

          Why? Because THE VACCINE MAKES IT SO YOU DON’T GET VERY SICK FROM COVID.

          And to this guy, this is a clever argument for not getting vaccinated.

          There just isn’t enough facepalm in the entire f*cking universe to account for this sheer, stupefying, numb-nuts stupidity.

          • 0 avatar
            khory

            If you don’t get very sick then what is the problem? I’m vaxed. I don’t give two snots about anyone else. I’m not their nanny and neither are you.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            FM – the deathrate is a lagging indicator, correct? A few days ago (less than a week) the death rate was down 16%. Today on the news I saw the death rate is now down 1%. So I’d imagine in a week the death rate will be up double digits. Clearly masking, distancing, and occupancy limitations helped. We should be free of Covid by now for the most part. Instead we are going to have a new wave. Frankly I wouldn’t give a damn if the deaths stayed only with those who refused a “Fauci Ouchie” and variants didn’t threaten those who did the right thing. I’d consider it Darwinism.

            I have to laugh when I hear the “my body my choice” argument for vaccination. Yet when it comes to a woman’s reproductive rights, they are all about butting in to people’s lives. Hypocrites.

            EB’s post below is a prime example of zero critical thinking skills. Education in America clearly needs a reboot.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “EB’s post below is a prime example of zero critical thinking skills. Education in America clearly needs a reboot.”

            Lol when you rage at common sense. Crazy that when you don’t like facts and data you call it numb-nuts stupidity.

            You are a sheep. You have zero critical thinking skills and just prefer to be spoon-fed utter nonsense by people driven by a political agenda.

            Heck, you don’t even know the definition of “vaccine”. If it’s a vaccine, then you don’t get it. But maybe we are talking about a different vaccine. We couldn’t possibly be talking about the vaccine that was villainized by libs and our democratic political “leaders” encouraged people not to get it because they have Trump derangement syndrome could we?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @EBFlex – have you been vaccinated against SARS-COV-2?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @EBflex:
            Speaking of “zero critical thinking skills”..

            “If it’s a vaccine, then you don’t get it.”

            That’s not correct. No vaccine is 100% effective. It took me all of five seconds to verify that.

            https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/ensuringsafety/history/index.html

            DERP…

            (The next “argument” will be “…but…but…but…if it’s not 100% effective, then why take it?” Good question. By the same token, condoms are only 80%-90% effective in preventing pregnancy…why use them? LOL…)

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Same as before, masks don’t work. They never have. The evidence is clear.

    And let’s ignore the fact that the vaccine is not a vaccine. Many people who have been vaccinated (like the fools in Texas who fled the state because they are adult children) are getting it. But despite the fact people are getting it, deaths are declining. So, this non-wave is even less of a threat than the big wave we saw last fall (when everyone was masked…weird).

    This is more grandstanding from the “follow the science” mouth breathers that think men can give birth.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “But despite the fact people are getting it, deaths are declining.”

      Gee, why? Because if you get the vaccine, even if you catch the virus, it won’t make you as nearly as sick.

      In other words, the vaccine is working exactly as it’s supposed to. Good job shooting your own incredibly stupid argument right in the head.

      I’m creative as hell and I can’t even make up s**t like EB’s peddling.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Virginia just started posting their COVID statistics separated by vaccination status:
      https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/covid-19-data-insights/covid-19-cases-by-vaccination-status/

      Their numbers show that your odds of avoiding COVID/hospitalization/death are drastically better if you’re fully vaccinated.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        @Luke:

        It’s just baffling why people would cling to the “I ain’t gonna get the shot” argument anymore. I just…don’t get it.

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          Chances of getting through without serious illness are definitely much better with the vaccine. The Virginia page doesn’t show the corresponding percentages of illness and hospitalization for non-fully-vaccinated people, which I calculated as 0.07% and 0.003%, respectively, over the last 2 weeks. So I guess the silver lining is that chances overall are quite good at this point for both cohorts.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “@Luke:

          It’s just baffling why people would cling to the “I ain’t gonna get the shot” argument anymore. I just…don’t get it.”

          Maybe it was because the liberal political leaders encouraged people not to get it and undermined it from the start:

          “In September, Harris, then the Democratic Party’s vice-presidential candidate, hesitated when asked if she would take a vaccine that was approved before the election.

          “I will say that I would not trust Donald Trump,” Harris said, “and it would have to be a credible source of information that talks about the efficacy and the reliability of whatever he’s talking about. I will not take his word for it.”

          Cuomo went further, suggesting he mistrusted not just President Donald Trump, but also the Food and Drug Administration under Trump. Asked about his confidence in the FDA, Cuomo indicated he didn’t have much.”

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @EBflex:

            Once again…Harris was referring to a vaccine that hadn’t even been introduced yet.

            Stop BSing already.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I bet if you told EBFlex that Stelantis had developed the vaccine and Ford was against it he’d be first in line to get it.

            Of course then it might actually have serious side effects, likely manifesting exactly 3 years and one day after the injection.

            “Ooooh, sorry Mr. Flex, looks like your Zombie condition is out of warranty”

      • 0 avatar
        khory

        All the more reason to carry on as normal. Non-vaxxers can take their chances.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @khory – the unvaccinated, if a large enough population act as a reservoir and breeding ground for new strains. That increases the odds of the vaccinated to get ill.

          One can view it as Darwinism on a grand scale but it spills over to the rest of us.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @khory:

          Except that the non-vaxxers can have this virus and not know it, and spread it to someone else.

          But that’s kind of beside the point. If our vaccination rate were closer to 100%, this “do I mask or not” debate would be over.

          • 0 avatar
            khory

            Look, everyone that wants and is eligible likely has it. Kids are largely unaffected so their risk is also low. Those with other reasons, it is incumbent on them to take precautions, not everyone else.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          @khrory,
          “All the more reason to carry on as normal. Non-vaxxers can take their chances.”

          Once everyone living in my house is eligible for the vaccine, then that argument will carry some weight.

          Until then, the “pandemic of the unvaccinated” is a big deal — when 3/5ths of my household cannot yet become vaccinated.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      We cannot blame the American educational system for EBFlex’s inability to understand science. Blame the USSR’s system. Wonder if EBFlex got the Sputnik vaccine?

      Here is a link to just one scientific article demonstrating that masks do work.
      http://www.pnas.org/content/118/4/e2014564118

      Deaths lack at least 2 weeks behind infection rates.

      Having a large group of unvaccinated individuals provides the virus with more opportunity to mutate.

      Some individuals cannot be vaccinated. Those who can but chose not to put those who cannot at increased risk.

      Having had to do so, I must admit that wearing a mask in a production environment is tiring and slows production.

      Finally the Federal Government would have been better off letting the Confederacy secede. Instead we have the ‘tail wagging the dog’ with Confederate legislators controlling much of the USA’s policy.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        I posted the same link. The fearmongers, revisionists, instigators, agitators et al won’t directly address fact. They’ll dance about it, lob “what-about’isms and various other tactics. The collateral damage due to Darwinist culling of the herd isn’t worth it.

  • avatar
    TheEndlessEnigma

    Hi TTAC, good job injecting politic into your blog. Well done.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      A story about GM, the UAW, and an automotive plant’s response to a worldwide pandemic are certainly relevant at TTAC. Politics are a natural part of the deal.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    “But new cases have increased, with the state seeing infections double among both the vaccinated and unvaccinated over the last several weeks. Averages remain smaller than they were over the cold weather months.”

    Not really. The rolling 7-day average for new cases in Missouri right now is 2,103 a day, which is higher than it’s been since January 25, and has more than doubled over the last two weeks. The number hospitalized is also higher than it’s been since midwinter. The number of deaths is lower right now, but deaths are a lagging indicator, by about three weeks given the gestation time of the disease.

    Unless they can actually verify that everyone in the factory is vaccinated, and given the current vaccination rate in Missouri, a mask mandate is a pretty obvious step if they want to maintain a healthy, and available, workforce.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Agreed. I posted a meta-analysis of data related to COVID-19. An excerpt:

      “Only one observational study has directly analyzed the impact of mask use in the community on COVID-19 transmission. The study looked at the reduction of secondary transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Beijing households by face mask use. It found that face masks were 79% effective in preventing transmission, if they were used by all household members prior to symptoms occurring.”

  • avatar

    I had a blood test today. I am afraid they are going to clone me. It is intrusion into my privacy.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Back to the article…

    The UAW has a duty to protect its workers. GM has a duty to protect its shareholders.

    Neither is served well if a Covid outbreak takes down the plant.

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    I honestly could care less about what a private company wants to do with it’s employees.

    I know people who got covid where their offices were 100 percent masked and linked directly to the offices. MIT showed that even with wearing mask, that if air isn’t exchanged, that an infectious person can saturate the air so that others can get infected. This is exactly what happened to several people I know.

    I do believe masks work in helping reduce viral load when close to someone for a brief period of time, as large “dropplets” will get caught. However, in an enclosed environment eventually the air will get saturated over time.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Yep. This is between those employees and their union. It concerns me not.

      I have a 20 hour trip coming up and while having a mask on the entire time will be somewhat miserable it pales in comparison to the misery inflicted by United’s decision to ban booze through all of this. I am a Delta man. Sadly they don’t fly where I’m going.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        United nearly kept us from flying to Turkey back in May, because they had the incorrect Covid rules for Germany in their computer. The drones at the desk absolutely wouldn’t listen to the information we had in front of us regarding that country. (Germany needed only 1 test, not 2).

        Fortunately, a thinking worker at the next desk rerouted us past Germany to avoid the ‘problem’, and this only cost us 2 more hours. On the return trip, we passed through Germany with no problems.

  • avatar
    IH_Fever

    You guys never disappoint. The normal gaggle of leftists throwing their self righteous arrogance upon those who refuse to fall in lockstep with the hysteria. The alt right conspiracy theorists that have gone down the internet rabbit hole and have a plethora of “facts” to show us. It’s well past having gotten old. Yes covid is real, yes people have died. We all gotta die sometime, losing it over this fact ain’t going to help anything. Wear your mask, get your shot, or don’t, just shut up about it already.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      We all gotta die sometime, and thanks to Covid, last year that time was a year and a half sooner on average than it had been in 2019.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      @IH_Fever:
      “You guys never disappoint. The normal gaggle of leftists throwing their self righteous arrogance upon those who refuse to fall in lockstep with the hysteria.”

      Exposing yourself to a nasty disease just to prove you’re as smart as those overeducated/elite doctors and epidemiologists doesn’t prove anything.

      Get the vaccine, because it beats getting COVID — even when you factor in all of the probability and statistics.

      After that, you can return to your project of proving you’re smarter than everyone else.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        P.S.

        The best advice anyone gave me in business school was to sit down and listen to other people and really understand what they are telling you, and only then do you assert your decision.

        This is how teams become smarter than individual people.

        Really understand what that person is telling you, actively listen, actively ask questions until you understand what they’re really telling you. THEN, you make and assert your decision.

        Go see your doctor, have them answer your questions, try to really understand what they have to say. Give it a couple of days thought. THEN, make and assert your decision.

        THAT is how you can become smarter than everyone else, regardless of your IQ or education.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Luke42 – your business school advice applies to virtually everything and everyone. It’s the foundation of being a good healthcare professional. Listen, understand, empathize, collaborate, plan, implement, reassess.

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