By on June 7, 2021

Hello! We’re back again with another installment of the Golf Sportwagen Follies. In our last update, I’d dropped off the Golf for its second new headliner after a sunroof drainage issue caused some considerable water damage. Just under two weeks later (this past Friday), I received the “All finished!” call from the dealer and went over to pick it up a couple of hours later.

What I found afterward was less than impressive. Let’s have a look, shall we?

I noticed some of the issues below immediately upon checking out the car, while still at the dealer. The manager there assured me that she and another person had looked over the work, but they hadn’t spotted the issues I noticed. The headliner’s installment and fitting was less than good in several places. I know you all love seeing the details of my pain, so it’s all laid out here for you. Headliner problems first.

I noticed three total headliner issues when I got home and had a chance to get pictures. There was some particularly bad fitment around the rear driver’s side door light, and both vanity lights up front had the same sort of visible fabric edge on one side.  These were the only headliner issues noticeable enough to get a picture, but there was also some slightly wavy-looking fabric around the other interior light trims. Once I get it back I may be able to smooth that out by hand.

 

But the headliner issues above were not my primary area of concern. No, my primary problem was the damage caused by careless handling of the interior panels during the headliner transplant. We’ll separate the problems by color today, tan ones first. These panels were unmarked before the dealership visit, so the damage stood out pretty easily.

The first image is on the passenger side at the rear door trim, a panel between the door and the rear seat. Looks like it was gouged with a screwdriver, or drug along a sharp edge for four or five inches.

Second image is the B-pillar trim, where I suspect that the airbag logo needed to be removed to get access to a screw or fastener behind. Must’ve been difficult to remove, so just jab at it with a pointy object.

Now the damage to black plastics, all at the rear cargo area. The double scratches are along the side of the D-pillar.

Chunks were taken out along the left and right side of the cargo area as well, shown above and below. All damaged panels were most definitely caused while the car was in for this headliner swap. I was assured that they’d order new panels for damaged places, and give me a call when the parts arrived.

At the time I left the dealer I’d noticed only the B-pillar and rear door area scratches, as I couldn’t get fully investigative until I got home. I followed up with an email Friday afternoon and included these photos, but it was near the end of the day so I’ve yet to hear back as of writing.

Needless to say, I’m less than pleased that the car was returned to me with an improperly or incompletely fitted headliner and damaged panels that weren’t there prior. We’ll see if the dealer can make this right, and I’ll let you know exactly how long that takes. Meantime, the scraped-up Golf sits in the drive awaiting its new panels.

[Images: Corey Lewis / The Truth About Cars]

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79 Comments on “Where Your Author Will Need Another Post-headliner Service Visit...”


  • avatar
    dal20402

    I expect you could straighten those wrinkles around the lights out with a putty knife and some care, with much less risk of compounding the situation.

    But this is why I hate dealer service in general. Such a crapshoot. Sometimes it goes fine, and sometimes you get this, or the episode a couple months ago when Toyota of Seattle left the oil drain plug in my Highlander finger-loose.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      “left the oil drain plug in my Highlander finger-loose.”

      I had the opposite problem with a very highly reputed local shop. It took an 18″ breaker, both arms and a foot propped against of front tire to get the plug loose. I couldn’t believe it hadn’t stripped. Must have been something like 150 ft-lbs.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    And this is why I never take my car to the (incompetent, dishonest, pathologically lying) dealer. I once took an almost new care in to replace a broken side window. When I went to pick up the car (a Mazda) there was broken glass all over the floor, under the seat and still inside the door itself – a lot of glass, all the glass, not just a little. I was told that removal of the broken glass was not covered under warranty! I didn’t even know what to say.

    • 0 avatar

      Gotta have warranty work done, so that requires dealer, you know?

    • 0 avatar
      Ah_non_e_mouse

      I breathe a sigh of relief when my warranty is over. I’d rather have a root canal than go in to the dealer and fight to get warranty work done. And then getting the work done correctly is another crapshoot – “factory-certified” technicians… lol

      • 0 avatar
        Kenn

        ‘Same here. Between various makes and dealers, it has always been a fight for me. At least these dealership people didn’t look Corey in the eye and accuse him of causing the damage himself, or that it had already been there before the car was first dropped off. The dealerships I’ve had the displeasure of dealing with have universally been sleazy.

      • 0 avatar
        teddyc73

        @ Ah_non_e_mouse I have had nothing but good experiences with the two dealerships I have used, with maybe a couple exceptions which they made good on. I continue to use the one. They are definitely more expensive but they do good work. Although I did manage to get a great deal on tires after exhaustive research in my area so they aren’t always the most expensive. What is funny about “factory-certified” technicians?

        • 0 avatar
          Ah_non_e_mouse

          Well congratulations, you’ve found one of the few competent dealerships. I would stick with them if you’ve had good success. In my case, here’s a list off the top of my head what those “factory-certified” technicians have done to my cars over the years. Before I get into that though, what exactly does factory-certified mean ? Do they all go to the factory and get a piece of paper stamped that they are now certified ?

          – Broke the switch that illuminates courtesy lights when the door opens, refused to admit they were at fault
          – Installed new clutch incorrectly (clutch engagement was awful and almost undrivable), so that my local service shop had to redo the job properly
          – Left vacuum hose unattached after replacing the valve cover gasket
          – Installed timing belt incorrectly, the tech test drove the car after the install and didn’t even notice the racket it was making because the timing was off. I got in to go home and noticed it right away so had to take it back to get fixed properly.
          – Misdiagnosed suspension noise saying it was brake noise and I needed a brake job when the brakes were fine, again my local shop correctly diagnosed the noise as coming from a bad bushing
          – Tire pressures not set correctly before delivery. I’m paying through the nose for the PDI, you think they would get at least that right.

          And this is not even getting into the reams of extra work that service advisors have “advised” I get done to my vehicle, even though said work is not in the manufacturer’s service schedule (even the severe schedule). I would hate to be a person (woman or man) who knows very little about cars and have to take my vehicle to a dealership for service. They must see these poor people coming from miles away.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I think only the luxury dealers pay attention to detail, everything else is hit and miss.

      • 0 avatar

        My luxury dealer, when I showed them a radiator over flow tank with leaks, accused ME of over filling the tank. I then explained that back in the day I had crap cars and a toolbox in the trunk. When I bought this car, I bought the 100k warranty, and that I’m not touching S#it on this car till 100001 miles hit, save the Valentine One hard wire and a Kenwood Ham Radio…
        My BMW guy, on the other hand, reprogrammed my car to get rid of the lawyer screen on the nav without being asked (ok, I had a nice conversation with the tech)
        My VW dealer, after I asked for DRL to be shut off, explained they can’t change Vag-Com settings for that…and when I got the car, the DRL were shut off…..(again, spoke to the tech-I get yelled at occasionally by service managers, and don’t give a feces about your “insurance regs” and it’s my car, I can look at it all I want-I find annoying them helps me with the techs)
        My local Acura dealer ? Replaced a trans, didn’t replace a seal, puked all over my driveway….did the job twice….and missed a LOT of parts underhood……totally incompetent.

        Dealer work is all about “beating the book”…slap-dash hack is designed into the system, and warranty work is that x5….

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      That’s terrible.

      My lemon 05 Odyssey returned from one of its countless warranty visits with body damage on the rocker panel. They fixed it after I went nuts.

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    “The manager there assured me that she and another person had looked over the work, but they hadn’t spotted the issues I noticed.” So, what did they do, a cursory open the door and glance inside?? If I (as a manager) was going to give a customer my assurances that the job had been performed/completed correctly, I would make damn sure that my word would be upheld! Maybe I’m just too old school, and my standards are too high!

  • avatar
    Rocket

    For the life of me, I can’t understand why VW has such a poor reputation for both product quality and customer service. I also can’t imagine what prompted the rather quick discontinuation of the 6-year warranty. How long did it last? Two years?

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Shockingly bad product around the turn of the millennium killed the brand and their idea of bailing it out afterwards was going shockingly cheap. The dealers reflect what they’ve had to sell, and who they’ve had to sell it to.

      It’s mind boggling to me that someone can follow the car market closely enough to professionally blog about it and fall for a VW anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        Rocket

        I thought they were on to something when they made the move toward premium here in North America. I bought a 2014 Touareg TDI over diesel versions of the ML, X5, Cayenne and Grand Cherokee because I thought it was at least as good a product at a much better price. To my surprise, I loved that car right up until VW’s dieselgate ‘fix’ ruined it – even with its faults and quality issues.

        Now they’ve gone the opposite direction. I think they believe Toyota customers buy the product because they’re boring, and so they’re attempting to follow the same strategy. But Toyota customers would never put up with VW’s lousy quality and customer service.

  • avatar
    ajla

    This is a good example of why I think “if it is under warranty then why does it matter?” isn’t a compelling argument.
    This will all end up costing you $0 on the invoices but there is still a lot of time spent on the phone and going back-and-forth on the fixes.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Bingo. Unless they pick up and drop off your car plus give you a loaner all this back and forth becomes a major time waster. Take your monthly payment and figure it out per hour then start subtracting… you might be pretty upset in how much these “free” repairs are costing you.

      Plus this is the kind of fix dealers aren’t very good at. The skill set to do a headliner replacement is way different then the skills required for an oil change. Like the rest of the B&B this is why I avoid dealers as much as possible. You go in for one thing but get the car back with two or more things broken or damaged. Its a turn-n-burn game where the only way to be profitable is get the car out of the bay as quickly as possible. So they are going to cut corners and take short cuts. Why grab a plastic panel pry tool when a screwdriver is handy? So what if it leaves scratches… not my car, don’t care, nobody will notice, etc.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    “Hey Fairfield, y’all been great, but you can keep the blunt objects, greasy prints, and plastic scraping tools to yourself…I think I’m going to head on down to Norwood and check out Joseph VW from this point on…”

    And this VW saga continues. My VW just broke 4800 miles this morning, and right before heading on 64 to start a 50 mile drive, the check oil level message appears. At 4800 miles? One quart of new synthetic later, light and message are gone. Starting to wish I would have gone with that new Mazda…

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “Starting to wish I would have gone with that new Mazda…”

      Mazda vs VWoA

      I can’t pick a winner in that bout.

      • 0 avatar
        spookiness

        Mazda all day every day. In my younger years all my friends had VW and I liked them and wanted one, but was always too afraid, so I went with Mazda. Friends all had VW nightmares. I bought 4 Mazdas with only issue ever being a seized rear caliper.

    • 0 avatar

      Visited Joseph VW when I was shopping, and had a kinda pushy old guy salesman who didn’t follow through with what he said he’d do. He did however say in email “You’re going to have to get serious at some point and make an offer,” after not finding me a car that he said he’d find. Why would I make an offer on a black car I didn’t want?

      So have not been back down there.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    All of those, I believe, will BUFF RIGHT OUT!

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “sits in the drive”

    Driveway?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I guess it doesn’t bother the dealer that they’ll be eating hundreds of dollars in repair costs this time, because most customers would just do nothing.

    I’m currently awaiting the cost of some unauthorized repairs at a transmission shop. I asked for diagnosis, but they repaired what they found (clutch hydraulics) without even calling. Then when I called, they said it will need a new clutch and “we’ll let you know”. When I mentioned that I didn’t remember actually authorizing any repair work, they told me they could put the old parts back in and give me the car. I’m furious.

  • avatar
    Rick T.

    2016 Sportwagen owner here from new. I really like the car and have had pretty good luck with it. I won’t buy another VW because of the dealer service department. They managed to rotate my tires twice without noticing that -due to a significant alignment issue from the factory – two of the tires were balding on the inside half. They also quoted me new brakes all around due to wear three weeks after I went in for an oil change and the complimentary inspection. They apparently couldn’t find the small stone that was making the noise when I braked.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Those trim pieces were really only designed to go on once in the life of the vehicle, and they consider it lucky if they go on once correctly.

    Consider yourself fortunate; your delivery condition was perfection compared to how I got my car back from the infamous McNamara Pontiac of Brookhaven.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    The plastic wrap, looks like chrome finish surrounding one of the gauges on my Hyundai started to flake off. So since I was going out of town, I arranged to have the dealer replace it under warranty.

    My wife picked the vehicle up when it was finished.

    When I returned, I didn’t drive it or even look at it for a few days. My mistake.

    Got in the car and the steering wheel was gouged/scraped in multiple spots.

    The dealer refused to accept any responsibility. Said that we could have done it in the intervening 10 days. Yeah, right.

  • avatar
    gasser

    For me most of the vehicle satisfaction lies in the dealership experience. I’ve had cars that didn’t run well but the dealer treated me fairly and made me happy. I also had a great track record with Honda from the early 1980s on until recently. I brought it in to my local dealer for service, only to discover that the dealership had been sold to a big chain. While waiting for the oil change I was called to the service writers desk. He and the mechanic stood there shaking their heads and told me that the air filter and cabin air filters were filthy and needed immediate changing. When I told them I had just changed them myself two weeks prior, without missing a beat, the mechanic told me “oh there must be more than one black Honda, I guess I got them mixed up.”
    Next service interval, I went to a different dealer who told me that the two year old battery had failed a load test. Since that battery was purchased from the AAA, I declined buying a new battery. AAA came and tested the battery in front of me and it passed the load test. That was almost 3 years ago and it’s still working fine.
    Nowadays, if you visit a dealership for service and they lie to you, tell you that service is needed, but it isn’t, overcharge you, get your car dented and dirty and keep you waiting……thats craftsmanship in the 21st century.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    The dealership is taking a loss with your warranty work. It pulls them away from (the raping of) cash customers. That’s not yours problem, but it could be.

    I plan on never returning to the dealer between new vehicle purchases. I don’t want their criminal hands touching it.

    Free oil changes? I’ll tell them where they can stick those. You’re allowed to change your own oil, just save the receipts.

    • 0 avatar
      Ah_non_e_mouse

      And I’ll guarantee you will do a better job on the oil change than the factory-trained technicians. No oil caps left off or finger tight drain plugs.

  • avatar
    rvakenya

    I don’t know anyone who enjoyed their Volkswagen experience. Do they even get repeat sales? Maybe for the Golf? I saw one of their minivans on the road the other day. People bought that one to make sure they have company when it breaks down and leaves them stranded.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Actually, I did – owned a ’16 Jetta and it had zero issues. It was good enough that my next car will likely be a VW (without a sunroof).

      That doesn’t excuse this whole adventure, though.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    With the higher prices on used vehicles it might be a good time to sell your VW.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Corey, there is a chance that the color on the new trim panels won’t match to your satisfaction. I applaud you for getting the dealer to fix the issues, but at some point you have to pick your battles. (This is not a criticism – my dad definitely has your OCD [?] gene when it comes to vehicle blemishes, and I can definitely get into that mode myself.)

    *IF* someone had vehicle issues similar to what Corey’s pictures show and *IF* that person wanted to address them privately at an OCD (anal-retentive?) level during a quiet afternoon, the following items would be helpful [example brands shown; pick your own]:

    – “Tresalto Auto Trim Removal Tool Set” (blue, firmer)
    – “GOOACC Car Door Clip Panel Audio Video Dashboard Dismantle Kits Installer Pry Tool-4PCS” (orange, softer)
    Using these is one way to fix the rear driver’s side door light [lift the edge slightly with one plastic ‘pry tool,’ and gently massage the headliner material back into place using a second ‘pry tool’], and would have avoided the scratches to the “AIRBAG” escutcheon.

    – “American Line 66-0089 Single Edge Razor Blade Box (Pack of 100)”
    What you want to do here is *very* carefully trim off the high spots on the damaged interior plastic trim pieces, using a very sharp very fresh edge.

    – “Mini Heat Gun Electric 300W” (one with the small opening for focused heat application)
    After trimming off the high spots, *carefully* apply some heat to the remaining scratches on the plastic and they should tend to even out (maybe with some pressure from the rounded end of a wood craft stick). [Pry the escutcheon out before ‘trimming’ and heating it; let it cool before replacing it. Fix the other parts in-place, but direct the heat away from the carpet. Shield the door seals with a piece of cardboard.]

    • 0 avatar

      I think the car is new enough that color match won’t be an issue.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Sometimes service parts use a different supplier, tooling and/or process vs. regular production parts.

        Sometimes supplier changes for nurdles (or colorants) can result in mismatched parts.

        Sometimes there are unprecedented upheavals in the automotive supply chain over a relatively short timeframe.

        I am relieved that none of these will apply in your case.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Obviously the tech dragged the headliner through the hatch. It should be a 2 or 3 man/woman/lotboy operation, at least to get the liner in place. Screw this dealer, dealers in general and Corey, why are you running these criminals’ license plate frame?

    • 0 avatar

      No plate frame. The frame was on the loaner Tiguan.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        On that subject: why does ANYONE leave the dealer’s advertisement frames on their plates? The worst ones are the pink ones from Carmax or whatever it is. Pink does not make a good trim color, and that charity is mostly a high-profit scam.

        • 0 avatar
          Ah_non_e_mouse

          I actually have kept mine (front and back) because they’re not just frames, they are also clear license plate protectors. They are the only ones I’ve ever had that have not broken or yellowed. They are four years old and still look new. I was actually very well treated during the purchase process and got a really good deal so I don’t have negative feelings about this dealership which makes it easier to keep them on.

          But yeah, any other frame gets ditched as soon as I get home from the vehicle delivery.

  • avatar
    dr_outback

    As a former VW/Audi/Porsche service advisor I am surprised that there weren’t greasy finger prints all over the headliner and trim. Haha!

    With that being said, I am always amazed at how intelligent everyone seems to be on the B&B until it comes to the costs involved in automotive service.

    If no one wants to pay the dealer to service their vehicle, then the dealer will have little to work with to hire, train and maintain talent. The vehicle manufacturers certainly don’t want to pay a tech enough time to make repairs. Some repairs pay as little as .3. (That’s 18 minutes for the layman.). So customer pay is the only way to turn a profit in many cases.

    But yet everyone wants a loaner for the day and a free car wash and really high end snacks AND then have the audacity to say that they have “a guy” who can do it cheaper.

    It simply amazes me that there are so many geniuses on this B&B who cannot grasp basic economic principles.

    • 0 avatar
      CadiDrvr

      Yep, and yet complain about an oil change at the dealer being $175-$200?!?!
      Even though I’ve always driven luxury cars, I don’t care about the dealer facilities. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t want to pull up to a rundown “shack” but some of these “palaces” have the worst service.
      I do expect a loaner, otherwise just fix my car correctly the first time in a timely manner and return it to me in the same condition as I left it with you. (As a clean freak, my car is always spotless inside and out.)
      As an aside, the Jaguar and Porsche dealers here are supposedly the #1 dealers in the country for sales & service, the Infiniti and Lexus dealers top 5.
      Everyone who owns vehicles from all, agree the GMC dealer is the best, and it’s the old Oldsmobile dealer. The service waiting room hasn’t been remodeled since the early 70’s, save new chairs, but doesn’t matter as they fix your vehicle quickly, competently, and charge a more than fair price if it’s out of warranty. They don’t provide loaners outside of overnight warranty work, but there’s an Enterprise next door, and most times the rental will be complementary. AND YES, I’ve read the invoice and it’s never “hidden” somewhere…..

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      “But yet everyone wants a loaner for the day and a free car wash and really high end snacks…”

      Yes, because when that same dealer is giving their pitch as to why you want the Lexus instead of the same car down at the Toyota dealership down the street for 15k less all of that is touted prominently among the reasons.

      And yes, if I take a new car in 3 times for the same issue, I want both a loaner and it returned in the same condition otherwise I dropped it off in. That doesnt seem crazy.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Yeah that’s great! How about just fix it? Why should i or anyone give a fuk what the tech is paid or not for warranty repairs?

      Since the warranty repairs are more than subsidized by robbing cash customers, why should owners with valid claims have to put up with horse sh!t excuses, the full runaround and blatantly shoddy work?

      • 0 avatar
        dr_outback

        I’m not suggesting that customers or technicians be happy with poor quality workmanship.

        What I am saying is that many on this B&B expect very costly amenities while also expecting pricing below that of an independent mechanic. This causes such a slim profit margin that techs are not well paid so they take their hands to go work in other industries. This leaves an ever increasing majority of shoddy techs who can’t get a better paying job.

        Also, I lost count of how many times the dealership I worked at charged less than other repair centers but still had a reputation for being expensive.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Show a dealer that doesn’t play bullsh!t games/lies and any of the B&B will happily sit on a bucket and drink from the hose.

          I’ve done my time at dealers, and I don’t want to call anyone a liar, but they not only charge substantially more than the independents, the techs are largely unqualified to do the work, while advisors are busy selling totally unnecessary jobs and circle around the real problem, getting to that last if the victim is still there.

          The amenities are icing on the cake, but don’t kid yourself, any and all that have been burned would gladly tell them where to stick their jelly donuts and cappuccino.

        • 0 avatar
          Ah_non_e_mouse

          I don’t expect anything other than a competent repair when my car is in for service, warranty or not.

          When I’m footing the bill I will gladly pay all day long for quality goods or services, provided I get what I paid for. All I want is the vehicle returned in as good or better condition than when I dropped it off, with all of my complaints addressed.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The incompetence is a small part of the problem. They rob the public by denying warranties, and other BS when they don’t. They prey on the unknowing on the cash side.

            They’re all criminals until proven otherwise. Every bay must do some $15K a day, just remember that, depending the brand, location, etc. so they have to get ridiculous some times to pull it off.

            Yes it’s a circus. Often the whole dealer depends on those bays.

  • avatar
    W.Minter

    “Who’s the client? A car news site editor? Naahhh… he’ll never complain, he bought a VW, we know that type of client.”

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, Corey, my wallet thanks you – I have my car search down to a GTI/GLI, and was working a deal on a GLI Autobahn with the pano roof, but now? Negative…base model or bust.

    Sincerely,
    FreedMike, now three grand richer…

    (Honestly, don’t know why I was even looking at the Autobahn to begin with – the roof in my A3, which is the same platform, and I believe is the same basic design, never leaked, but the motor went went bad at 60,000 miles, to the tune of $700 in repairs. To the shop’s credit, they didn’t f**k up the headliner.)

    • 0 avatar

      Probably best to avoid the glass, yep. Though it’s got a slightly different/smaller roof than the wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      FreedMike – I bought a 2020 GLI w/o Autobahn package because I didn’t want the glass roof. I’ve read about the issues before with the sunroof, plus I despised the mesh cover that let in too much light when you didn’t want it, plus the “upgraded” stereo wasn’t that much of an upgrade, so save the money. The base car is excellent enough, and there are fewer gremlins at 60,000 miles to worry about.
      I just started a new job that has me on a 50 mile each way commute. I’m getting almost 40mpg on a combination of interstate and Indiana rural roads, it’s quiet, comfortable, and eats up the miles.
      Just pray that your wipers don’t fail constantly and you’ll be fine!!! ;-)

      • 0 avatar

        On the mesh sunshade note, I read that in a couple reviews that it let in too much light. I don’t get that effect with mine. There’s obviously light coming through because it’s a tan fabric with holes in it, but it’s never too much.

        I DO think they didn’t adjust the power of the AC in the Golf to consider the extra cargo area requiring cooling versus the regular hatch, however.

  • avatar
    cliff731

    Dump the VW while you can… and move on to something else.

    My last VW done it for me… circa 1981.

    I haven’t gone back to that VW brand since then.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Its Corey’s car but I was thinking the same thing is to sell the VW while used car prices are insanely high. It’s a nice car and I am sure it would sell quickly. The interior issues are frustrating and I agree the dealer has not done right by Corey but the real issue would be if something serious goes wrong with the car can the dealer be trusted to fix the car right. VW reliability is questionable. If Corey does keep the VW beyond the warranty he should find a reputable mechanic that is qualified to work on VWs. I wouldn’t trust the dealer to do out of warranty service especially with Corey’s experience with this dealer.

  • avatar
    thehyundaigarage

    Being that my first ticket was automotive upholstery at kwantlen, seeing that makes me cringe…My old boss at Seat Cover Centre in Vancouver would have dragged me by the neck if I would have generated work like that. What an absolute HACK JOB

    Dealer techs (or techs period) should never touch trim or upholstery work. They haven’t a clue how to do it correctly and without making tool marks on everything.

    The proper solution to this would have been to sublet the repair to a good trim/upholstery shop and let them know the customer expects a flawless return.

    Corey, if you were closer, I’d offer to fix it for you. You have an eye for every little mark like me lol

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    To (hopefully) avoid repair issues and then being told that “it was like that when it came in”, whip out your phone and take date stamped pictures of the car. Make a big show of it; service managers won’t like it, but they’ll know you’re serious about your car!! :-)

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I am glad I don’t own a German car. Even my wife’s nephew who works as a service advisor at a BMW dealership says that the newer BMWs have a lot of issues and that they are expensive to fix. Corey’s VW is a nice looking wagon but I am happy that my wife has a CRV.

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