By on June 7, 2021

It’s now been a full week since Memorial Day, the unofficial start of summer. And with the pandemic seemingly receding — my state and city move to full-go reopening on Friday — people are anxious to move.

Yet it’s been a brutal year for many of us lucky enough to not be among the 600,000+ dead. Some of us lost jobs or income. Others still aren’t ready to boogie quite yet, either because the virus is still out there and/or because they haven’t yet been fully vaccinated. And just because the city and/or state you live in may be reopened, it doesn’t mean a certain vacation destination you’re interested in will be.

So, our QOTD on this June Monday is simple — are you itching to hit the road, and if so, will you scratch that itch? Or would you rather keep it closer to home, availing yourself of your backyard (and maybe pool) or local options like the nearest park? Will you mix it up — meaning no road trips, but excursions to your local museums/ballparks/beaches/whatever?

If you are driving somewhere, do you have your eyes on a hot summer car, either something you’d buy or a rental (perhaps one from a place that rents exotics)? Or are you dusting off your trusty old Miata/Mustang?

Oh, and what tunes are you jamming?

No need to dox yourself, but satisfy our curiosity below.

[Image: Soloviova Liudmyla/Shutterstock.com]

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105 Comments on “QOTD: Summer Road Trip or Staycation?...”


  • avatar
    slavuta

    “Others still aren’t ready to boogie quite yet, either because the virus is still out there and/or because they haven’t yet been fully vaccinated.”

    Oh…. Not vaccinated and not going to. And ready to go. In fact, already participated in wedding, big birthday, big new year party, funeral. In the middle of 2020, next to people who tested positive to COVID previously.

    I would not go to India though…

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “I would not go to India though”

      I would think this is a standard procedure, unless perhaps one had business there.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “Not vaccinated and not going to”

      Since you’ve decided that the vaccine is worse than the disease, and you’ve already mixed it up with Covid carriers, why would you avoid India?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        SCE to AUX

        India is freaking disaster. They have a super deadly strain, not even vaccine helping. Just yesterday spoke with a neighbor who had 2 coworkers, fully vaccinated, went to India and perished in days there. Her dad died in the building where only small children survived. All adults in the building perished, in days.

        But you’re right. I split people into 2 groups. Those who afraid of the virus and those who afraid of vaccine. I am not anti-vax but mRNA – no thanks. I’ll wait for Novavax vaccine if this will be super required. Or I’ll take Putin’s offer to come and take Sputnik or Kovivac, or EpivacCorona – for a fee, all superior to mRNA based crap.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          So all the actual data says no, they are not superior. Still, The Johnson and Johnson vaccine that has been being administered for some time does not use MRNA technology. I’m sure you knew that.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “So all the actual data says no they are not superior”

            you don’t have such data. And yes – superior. Take sputnik, its real world effectiveness 98%. Study from Hungary found it more effective and safer than Pfizer. Study from Argentina found that it is 100% effective against Brazilian strain. San Marino had highest level of COVID infection in the world at the time and used Sputnik to beat the disease. Peer reviews were great for it. Some countries in EU just bypassed EU regulations with their political agenda and took Sputnik.

            Take length of coverage, Pfizer – 1/2 year. Sputnik – 2 years (advertised). And now it comes to to distribution. Pfizer must store at -80C. Moderna -20C. Sputnik – -4C. It is easier to distribute and store. Sputnik was actually made in 2 weeks after acquiring of the virus. It is based on the same well-proven platform as other great vaccines Gamaleya Center developed in the passed.

            J&J – yes. My brother actually knows personally the guy who developed J&J vaccine. It is developed in the science labs of Beth Israel hospital in Boston. While Pfizer is a German BionTech. But J&J so far considered less safe than Sputnik and less effective. My brother, however, thinks that bad name to J&J comes from Pfizer’s dirty tricks.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            He’s not anti-vaccine, he’s just anti-west. Dude, go to Russia then and take whatever you want. Nobody cares. Stay Hard!

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “anti-west”
            hahaha. This is why I am here right? The problem is not me, its the west. I have not changed. It is the west that used to be a beacon of freedom and now it is totally dropped its original values that attracted so many all around the world. And today this is the west that totally controls its citizens, removes one freedom after another, forces unwanted cultural changes. I have hard time to believe that you used to be a soldier.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            “Russia and China, in particular, continue to intensively promote their own state-produced vaccines around the world. The so-called “vaccine diplomacy” follows a zero-sum game logic and is combined with disinformation and manipulation efforts to undermine trust in Western-made vaccines, EU institutions and Western/European vaccination strategies. Both Russia and China are using state-controlled media, networks of proxy media outlets and social media, including official diplomatic social media accounts, to achieve these goals…

            “Both Chinese official channels and pro-Kremlin media have amplified content on alleged side-effects of the Western vaccines[lxviii], misrepresenting and sensationalising international media reports and associating deaths to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine in Norway[lxix] , Spain[lxx] and elsewhere[lxxi]…

            “In some cases, mRNA vaccines were specifically targeted both by the pro-Kremlin[lxxv] and Chinese state-controlled media. While early reports on the Western vaccines were relatively neutral[lxxvi], Chinese media outlets soon started comparing the vaccines and approaches[lxxvii], highlighting the allergic reactions allegedly associated to the Pfizer vaccine[lxxviii] but also the delays, allergic reactions, and risk for elderly people[lxxix] to sow doubt about the safety of mRNA vaccines in general[lxxx] and contrasting these to inactivated vaccines[lxxxi].

            https://euvsdisinfo.eu/eeas-special-report-update-short-assessment-of-narratives-and-disinformation-around-the-covid-19-pandemic-update-december-2020-april-2021/

            Yeah, that fits.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Astigmatism

            There are plenty of mRNA vaccine critics in the US/west in general. What you just copied in here is also a typical propaganda. But yes, in Russia doctors are not in favor of mRNA vaccines. nRNA was supposed to be a therapy for cancer patients.

            While Chinese vaccine is known to be weakest of all, Russian is actually a good vaccine as Lancet suggests https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(21)00191-4/fulltext

            BBC: “Russia’s Sputnik V coronavirus vaccine gives around 92% protection against Covid-19, late stage trial results published in The Lancet reveal. It has also been deemed to be safe – and offer complete protection against hospitalization and death.”

            I can also take you into historical context here, in which Russia is historically strong in ballet, ice hockey and vaccines. In fact, Russian doctor invented immunology, in case you did not know.

            I speak to some molecular medicine scientists, and what they say, they wouldn’t take mRNA. Don’t you read articles reporting now from Israel, where they went 100% Pfizer?
            “CDC investigating potential heart problems following COVID-19 vaccine”
            https://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/306648

            The reports of Pfizer side-effects from Europe were not pretty all along. You must be missed that part. Get your reading up.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            Interesting. Please tell me more about why you doubt the safety of mRNA vaccines in general[lxxx], and contrast these to inactivated vaccines in particular. If you have any international media reports that you could associate deaths to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine in Norway[lxix] , Spain[lxx] and elsewhere, that would be particularly helpful.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Astigmatism

            One my relative works for one [US] state government, and deals specifically with vaccinations in the state [not just covid – all] for 20+ years. This person sent this to me and to one molecular medicine scientist I have at my disposal. This scientist confirmed – this correct observation.
            https://www.bitchute.com/video/nuM0G6PqgwIK/

            Read something like this
            “Pfizer’s Covid vaccine is linked to MORE blood clots than AstraZeneca’s – so why isn’t the EU banning it? Hypocrisy of European nations revealed as Italy admits decision was ‘POLITICAL\'”
            https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9366963/Coronavirus-Pfizers-Covid-vaccine-linked-blood-clots-AstraZenecas-UK.html

            Tip, don’t use google, bing for search, and you WILL find great info.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Slavuta: your claims are garbage:

            https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2021/jun/07/facebook-posts/no-proof-researcher-claim-covid-19-vaccines-spike-/

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @slavuto wears two hats but serves one master. Troll and salesman. Mother Russia must be proud of you.

            You are siting sources posted on BitChute.

            ROTFLMFAO

            BitChute is a video hosting service known for accommodating far-right individuals and conspiracy theorists, and for hosting hate speech.

            I’ll source my medical information from CINAHL Plus or the Cochrane Library. UPTODATE is a nice “readers digest” source of information.

            Oh.. forgot.. you have to be a professional to subscribe.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “My brother actually knows personally the guy who developed J&J vaccine”

            Dan Barouch? BIDC is part of Harvard Med. Barouch is also at Ragon. I get some funding for my research from Harvard Med. While I’ve never worked with Dr. Barouch, I have done some work in immunology. Actually made some discoveries with my little AI toy. If I wasn’t into the AI thing, I’d have gone for immunology or neuro-endocrinology. Now I’m AI and computational neuroscience.

            Side story about Barouch’s other affiliation, the Ragon Insititute. I went to Susan Ragon’s birthday party. This is an example of how the really rich live. She actually hired Paul McCartney to play the party and James Corden hosted it. It was this sort of fifties diner/soda fountain theme. Tell your brother to ask Dan about that party. Not many people would know about that. I think Dan would. He might have been there. Yeah, I travel in some interesting circles.

            If I do bump into Dan, I’ll ask him about your brother for sure. I’ll check my email from my immunology work and see if he was copied on my research. Odds are he was. I’m curious.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            mcs,

            Yep. My bro pushes American science in the same building.

            And please, don’t give me any “fact” checkers. All these are fake activists. Specifically, about the audio you heard, there is nothing there about any “toxins”

            Lou_BC

            do anything you want. you need to learn that most conspiracies ended up as truth. And you’ve been wrong on COVID all along

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “And please, don’t give me any “fact” checkers.”

            Too bad, you’re gonna get them and more.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “Yep. My bro pushes American science in the same building.”

            Well, that means 3 Blackfan Circle. I might have worked directly with them once. Not as part of the team, but as a volunteer subject when COVID-19 first started when they were looking for blood samples and people to track. We did the blood draw right on the street. Merck has research labs right next to it.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            That’s so interesting Slavuta. But the real question is what does then data say about contracting covid from the soup bowls of Taliban fighters with whom you are sharing a meal. That can’t be very hygienic. I’d get the vaccine.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “contracting covid from the soup bowls of Taliban fighters”

            1. Not Taliban fighters, they were Soviet soldiers after all. Taliban people rather

            2. Dr Faucci had not created this virus at the time.

            3. Soup was hot, so, it was a natural virus-killing environment

          • 0 avatar
            Flipper35

            Well, having had COVID 19 not long ago I am holding off on the vaccine for now since there is little evidence that your natural antibodies go away in a short time. ArsTechnica.com had an article that shows most still have as good an immune response at 8 months after recovery. I may get the J&J, but I am in no rush.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “And you’ve been wrong on COVID all along”

            Citations required

            Go polish your autographed “Putin naked on horse” statue.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Typical Trumpist sh!tting in the city swimming pool.

      There are lots of people who have real health conditions that make them ineligible for the vaccine. Unless you are one of them, staying unvaccinated doesn’t make you macho, it just hurts them.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Typical fascist vaccine police. My body, my choice.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Your body, and everyone else (especially sick people) suffers the consequences. People who are that irresponsible toward others need to be called out.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            dal,

            I don’t really care if Russian population declines or grows. But look at the facts. China is also gonna be declining. Many other countries in fact. This is a well known trend and simply explainable. Countries that will grow are like Turkey, Iraq, Iran where they make own babies, and US (immigration). Russia has 1.6 birth and work migration, not real immigration, they come and go.

            What is interesting (and remember my words), is that this decline in countries around Russia will lead to growth in Russia. Armenia is candidate #1. It is coming to the point where there are more Armenians living in Russia than in Armenia and they can’t defend themselves against Azerbaijan/Turkey. Natural solution – join Russian federation. I said this long ago and I give 80% chance this will happen fairly soon. Voila, just pulled some internet – there it is, previous president of Armenia agrees with me. They don’t yet have the consensus in Armenia but give it some time. Belarus is also on its way into full integration with Russian federation. Baltic states are next immediate candidates. As they run out of people, with big % of Russians, they will have to join something. EU right now feeds them. But Russia can give them work, something to do.
            My lovely Ukraine was at 50M+. Right now.. may be 38M, about 4M live in Russia.

        • 0 avatar
          MeJ

          @slav
          BS. Your body maybe, but if you get infected because you’re a conspiracy theorist and I get near you, then it’s MY body that could get it. And that’s not happening just because you think you’re some sort of rebel. Idiot…

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            MeJ,

            I may be an idiot but not a pathetic weakling like you. We, the idiots, low tech, simple people, have crushed Roman Empire with all of its technology. Our simple T34 tanks in real life became more superior than advanced Tigers. And we, the followers of Darwin will walk over your, the fearful bunch, graves, carrying flag of humanity and evolution.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Always amusing to look at the internet gorilla beat its chest, but the truth is the people who invented the T-34 continue to drink themselves into oblivion with cheap tasteless vodka.

            https://www.macrotrends.net/countries/RUS/russia/population

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Fortunately the Russians never put their two great inventions simultaneously and drunk invaded Europe or Central Asia. Just imagine armored columns swerving down the thoroughfare blissfully unaware of the DUI checkpoint ahead…

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I am sure that vodka helped the Russians save Moscow in 1941, and I’ll never begrudge a choice to fight a war drunk by a conscript soldier. But the problems Russia faces today are rather different.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Several macro factors in play there, not sure if vodka was one of them but perhaps.

            I think the whole world faces different problems than it did in Winter 1941, well for the most part.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            28-Cars-Later

            Factors are simple. 1.6 birth rate. You need 2.2 to break even. Even more for growth. Of course, there are more people in Russia than any of these trends suggest. They count Russian nationals. While there are also millions of Ukrainians, Chinese, Armenians, Azeris; and who knows how many Uzbeks, Kazakhs, Georgians etc, all working and living in Russia only not holding the citizenship.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            What are you talking about? Birth rate?

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Sure

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          slavuta,

          “Typical fascist vaccine police. My body, my choice.”

          Don’t you know that that type of attitude is keeping all of us from reaching that bright shining future??:-) It’s all gets rather bizarre. There are plenty of people with the proper credentials who have grave doubts about these vaccines — both their safety and efficacy. But, it just never seems to reach the MSM. (I’d say I don’t know why it doesn’t, but I do.)

          Even suggesting that CV19 came from a lab was prohibited, but now it’s OK. It looks like they may be going to use Fauci as a scapegoat. Gotta blame someone for the excesses. If it gets there it will make a good show trial.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Old_WRX

            Think about this, Pfizer CEO wasn’t allowed to cross into Israel because he wasn’t vaccinated. Hmmm. And CDC personnel is about 60% vaccinated according to the director.

            BTW, interesting story. How Israel got all the needed vaccine and pretty fast. Pfizer CEO and Netanyahu are personal friends. Netanyahu paid 2x for each shot. Voila. But Israel went total fascist with it – lined up all sheep under threat of them losing jobs, etc. Oh boy.
            I am now wondering. If this vaccine is bad and it is German. I don’t even want to think of the full complexity of this situation.

            Quite similar to the sticky situation in Ukraine. When Germans were offered to be peacekeepers between central government and eastern regions, they said, “we don’t even want to think about going to Ukraine again”.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        Some people are just afraid of the needle. All the other BS is just a fluffer, fluffing.

  • avatar
    Slawek

    “In 2020, approximately 3,358,814 deaths occurred in the United States”
    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7014e1.htm
    That is way more than 600,000+ dead

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Foley

      That’s TOTAL DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES, not just COVID deaths.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Hospitals had intensives to register deaths as COVID. Can’t trust system like this.

      • 0 avatar
        Slawek

        Is death from covid more important?

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Slawek
          Yes! Covid death pays more $$ to the hospital

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Source?

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Art, from CDC director hearings

            “I think you’re correct in that we’ve seen this in other disease processes, too. Really, in the HIV epidemic, somebody may have a heart attack but also have HIV — the hospital would prefer the [classification] for HIV because there’s greater reimbursement,” Redfield said during a House panel hearing Friday when asked by Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer about potential “perverse incentives.”
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMLXYpK_3WU

            “Birx and others feared that the CDC’s data-tracking system was inflating coronavirus statistics like mortality rates and case numbers by up to 25%.”
            https://www.businessinsider.com/deborah-birx-cdc-comments-coronavirus-task-force-meeting-2020-5

            Politifact
            “Medicare will pay hospitals a 20% “add-on” to the regular DRG payment for COVID-19 patients. That’s a result of the CARES Act, “

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Covid death pays more $$ to the hospital”
            @slavutu

            Bullish!t

            Recycling the same old lies. It costs much more to care for an ICU patient on a ventilator.

            @Matt Foley

            USA
            “Deaths nationwide were 21 percent higher than normal from March 15, 2020, to Feb. 20, 2021.”

            Canada’s “excess mortality” is 8% higher than what was typical pre-pandemic.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Lou_BS

            please, don’t discredit yourself more than you did already. Remember, how you denied that COVID 19 was man-enhanced virus? Now this is pretty obvious. If you want to live in denial, go ahead. May be you want to deny that CDC has changed criteria how to count covid deaths? you can’t. It is an official document.

            Preliminary Guidance for Certifying COVID-19 Deaths pdf icon[PDF – 171 KB]
            Preliminary information for reporting deaths due to COVID-19
            Released: 3/4/2020

            Some authorities said that if the old guidance was used, the death count would be 1/4 of what it is now. I don’t know. But this is fact, they allowed more loose criteria for COVID.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @slavutu – I take it you don’t read what you post. It’s a standard medical certificate of death and how to correctly fill one out. I’ve seen plenty in my time.

            SARS-COV-2 is a virus that causes COVID-19. ARDS, heart failure, renal failure are typical sequelae.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Besides our usual trips to Grandma’s house and the cabin, we have a Western road trip later this summer (Yellowstone & Glacier parks, Mt. Rushmore, and points in between). Planned last fall when the virus situation was far from certain and an outdoor trip seemed safer.

    My kids and wife have never seen anything like it, and I haven’t been any of those places myself in over 20 years.

    As for vehicle choice, I hope to borrow a minivan from my company’s fleet and get free gas, but if one isn’t available it will be our trusty Sienna. Hardly thrilling I know.

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    Road-tripping to Clearwater next week in the good old Odyssey (my van down by the river). Drove to St. Aug Beach in March and drove to the OBX last June two weeks after the OBX reopened.

    We are double-vaxxed now, but weren’t for the previous two trips. Not that it mattered. I worried more about rain than about catching The Virus, presented by the Chinese Communist Party.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I’ve been road tripping since last March when they shut us down for air travel. As much as I typically enjoy it, I have had enough for a while and will be flying for both personal and business moving forward unless it within 3 hours or so driving. I did purchase a phone with a big battery as I have some real long haul stuff on the horizon and you can’t drive over the Pacific anyway.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Got our shots and already spent an extended weekend on the west coast of FL, had a great time and thus are planning another longer trip back soon. I took my Dakota since I towed my boat over. My parents got jabbed and flew out to Yellowstone where they rented a mini van for the next two weeks of exploring. Things are returning to normal. I have several co-workers that reported flights are full again.

  • avatar
    Dan

    I’m not itching to drive anywhere, our godawful east coast traffic is back in full effect and the memory of last year’s respite only makes it worse. I’ve taken two trips already but time on the road is, most of the time, just another chore to endure.

    The Chinese virus and its cheerleaders can pound sand.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’ve gone on driving trips of at least 500 miles 3 of the last 4 weekends and I have more planned for the next 5 consecutive weeks.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    We’ll be doing the usual Rocky Mountains family reunion this summer. Thankfully, all the adults in the family are vaccinated, even the hard-core Trumpist family members. (They knew the rest of us wouldn’t get together if they didn’t get the jabs.)

    For us, the trip is 1100 miles each way, which we split over two days. Vehicle of choice is our Highlander Hybrid, which is outstanding on such trips: comfortable, quiet, smooth, roomy, tons of bric-a-brac space, and quick enough with the now-departed V6 powertrain to be unfazed by serious mountain climbs even when loaded down with people and gear.

  • avatar
    don1967

    As one who follows the science, I will defer getting jabbed until I’m in a sufficiently high risk group to justify the hassle and the unknown risk of long-term side effects.

    Because this makes me a selfish moron according to Facebook warriors and CNN experts, I will probably spend my summer floating in the pool, waiting for the hysterical masses to tucker themselves out.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “to justify the hassle”

      Walk in, provide some info, get shot, return in two weeks, get shot again. The only hassle was the 36-hour recovery my wife and I had, but that was on a Friday afternoon to Saturday.

      Do you believe the vaccine is worse than the disease? What science tells you that?

      If you’re waiting to observe long-term effects, that indefinite timeline obviously means you have no intention of being vaccinated.

      I don’t care if you do or don’t, but having personally known two people who have died of Covid – and a few that nearly did – it’s you who’s taking the chance.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        My first Phifer shot left me with an achy arm. The second I got late in the day. I slept poorly due to spells of chills. I had a bit of a headache and felt wiped out the next day. That was it.
        No myocarditis, no clots, no worries.

        mRNA just tells your body to produce antibodies. This isn’t new technology.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          First Pfizer dose just kind of made me feel high the next day. I felt fine but was almost totally unproductive.

          Second Pfizer dose made me feel a bit achy and down, again for one day. Slept a long time that night and was fine the second day after.

          In both cases far, far preferable to COVID, which I suspect I may have actually had in early February 2020, before it was widely known to be in the US. It was either COVID or a fuck!ng miserable flu with a lot of weird and harsh symptoms.

        • 0 avatar
          MeJ

          @Lou
          I’m guessing you’re in British Columbia? Cool, me too.
          Anyway, all I got from my first shot was a ridiculously good sleep. I got my shot at 11:45am and went to bed around 9pm and slept 14 solid hours! It was amazing!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @MeJ – Yup. I’ve known a few people get rather sick for a day or two on the 2nd shot. Fever, chills, aches, nausea. Almost like a bad flu.

  • avatar
    ajla

    When did “jabs” become the preferred nomenclature for receiving a vaccine? My entire life I never heard this term used in that context and now it is everywhere. I always just referenced them as a “shot” or “vaccine”.

  • avatar
    watersketch

    Speaking of tunes – a nice surprise that SiriusXM turned itself on in our 2 vehicles this last week. I think it’s good for a week or 2. And our Subaru dealer sends us a “3 month free trial” every time we bring it in for service…..

  • avatar
    spookiness

    Lots of regional trips for me around VA and MD. State parks, wineries, etc. Will be trying to avoid interstates and certain bridges.

  • avatar
    multicam

    Road Trip: Tampa, Florida to somewhere south of Death Valley and west of the Mojave Desert, California. One way trip.

    Vehicles of choice: 2018 4Runner with wife driving and two 70 lbs Airedales, also pulling a 5 x 8 cargo trailer. Following her: 2019 Wrangler with me driving. If you see us, wave and make a “T” sign like for a timeout and I’ll know you’re from TTAC.

    COVID hasn’t factored into my decision-making process since it became a thing. I’m moving across the country and I’m not going to let a virus stop me.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Last summer, we left the Eastern Shore of Maryland in August with our GMC towing our Airstream travel trailer for a leisurely cross-country trip to see our then 7-month old grandson in California, stopping at several national parks we hadn’t visited before. Eventually returned in late October, having survived the entire trip disease-free (though we did take precautions). No travel plans this year, but for our Canadian B&B members, please tell your PM and whomever else is in authority that this American would love to take the trans-Canada highway, stopping for visits at your lovely parks through Banff National Park. My wife and I, both near or over age 70, have been fully vaccinated. Though, for the life of me, I don’t understand why that should concern other people.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Just returned from 1-week visit to Turkey (7 times zones from me), for our daughter’s wedding. They are supposedly 2nd after India on Covid issues, and completed a 3-week total shutdown the day before we arrived.

    They still have a daily 10 pm to 5 am curfew, and a weekend curfew, but touri$t$ can do anything they want.

    As for domestic travel, no plans yet. Other than this trip, I’ve not been more than 50 miles from home since March 2020.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Boat trip! Sailing up the New England coast for a couple weeks later in the summer. Vaccine or no, something still skeeves me out about staying in a hotel, so having a self-contained place to travel, cook and sleep is a godsend.

    One of these days I’ll be ready to sleep in a hotel again, but I don’t know when that will be.

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    97 percent of all the new cases are from people not vaccinated. this problem will take care of itself. And if you aren’t vaccinated you should be charged the full cost of your treatment.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      And if you are fat, not eating healthy, not exercising, smoking, drinking bit too much beer? Should these people also be charged full cost for their heart disease treatment?

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Not everyone who is not vaccinated chose not to get vaccinated. The selfish ones who choose not to get vaccinated are throwing those people under the bus, usually for silly conspiracy-theory reasons.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Ok dude. First show me an FDA-approved vaccine, then we can start talking. Talking people into an experimental drug is criminal.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          What in the he!l do you need an FDA piece of paper for when you have literally 100 million people who have received the vaccine and an infinitesimal number of meaningful side effects? And when the alternative is to keep spreading a disease that would kill a million or more Americans if everyone in the country got infected?

          I’d get your attitude in the very beginning, but once a few hundred thousand people got the vaccine without incident I’d think any reasonable person would become convinced it is worth the risk.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “you have literally 100 million people who have received the vaccine”

            Let me fix this for you – have received the experimental medication (and signed paper not to sue the manufacturer if anything goes wrong)

            “and an infinitesimal number of meaningful side effects” – including death of thousands

            “spreading a disease that would kill a million or more Americans” – they would die anyways

            BTW, thank Dr Faucci for all of this. First he created this disease, now he wants experiment on you with vaccine. Basically, Americans are turned into real sheep. Corporations make billions.

            I wouldn’t take it just to deny big pharma my money.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “death of thousands”

            Quit making stuff up. You can count the number of possibly vaccine-caused deaths on two hands. Again, this is out of over 100 million people vaccinated. Few medications anywhere are so benign.

            “they would die anyways”

            Yes, much later. If I shoot you today, is it OK because you would have died anyway in a few decades?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree he is using hyperbole and nothing resembling facts.

            “Few medications anywhere are so benign.”

            Please tell me you don’t believe this. While I do not believe these “vaccines” are stealth killers or that many thousands of died because of it, I also do not believe it is some kind of divine inspired super technology. In 100m doses, I do not believe deaths and significant AEs are in a 0.0000001% etc. range and I hope any rational thinker is not so ignorant.

            Here’s what will happen, it will come back and spread because even some percentage of vaccinated WILL spread it and this event will test the true effectiveness of the “vaccine” in field conditions. If it auto-magically works as sold, you’ll see more of a voluntary movement toward it. Till then everyone needs to just shut up about it.

            “Although COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting sick, scientists are still learning how well vaccines prevent you from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to others, even if you do not have symptoms. Early data show that vaccines help keep people with no symptoms from spreading COVID-19, but we are learning more as more people get vaccinated.”

            https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/keythingstoknow.html

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            If you think vaccine-caused deaths are more than the few we know about, show me the source.

            The numbers say, at least so far, this thing is safer than regular-strength Tylenol. NB: I’m not talking about whether it leads to increased COVID cases among the unvaccinated from increased spread. I’m talking about the vaccine itself.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            There is also this opinion from a Nobel prise winner in medicine

            “French virologist and Nobel Prize winner Luc Montagnier called mass vaccination against the coronavirus during the pandemic “unthinkable” and a historical blunder that is “creating the variants” and leading to deaths from the disease”

            https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/world/mass-vaccination-during-pandemic-a-historic-blunder-nobel-laureate-luc-montagnier/ar-AAKmnJr

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Israel is a testbed for Pfizer. They are report source to this pharma co. See what you get here

            https://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/297051

      • 0 avatar
        multicam

        dal, I hadn’t even considered those who can’t get vaccinated due to medical reasons. Is that even a significant number of people? What are we talking about here numbers wise? What would make someone medically ineligible?

        This makes me think of two older friends of mine and their disabled daughter who I’ve known all my life (she’s my age, early 30’s)… super paranoid before the vaccine, didn’t leave their house because their daughter is high risk. Now they feel safe doing so because of the vaccine. And let me tell you, she is SUPER high risk. She required constant medical attention and monitoring BEFORE the virus was a thing. Frankly I’m surprised her doctors let her get the vaccine.

        So I thought hey, perfect. High risk people can get the vaccine, those of us who aren’t in the slightest bit concerned don’t have to get it, win-win.

        But now you’re telling me I STILL need to feel guilty about not getting it? Dude… no. If you’re scared, get the vaccine; if you’re not, don’t; if you medically cannot get any of the vaccines… well I don’t know what to tell you. Sucks to suck. Keep social distancing I guess. But don’t try to guilt me into getting stuck with something that I don’t need.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          There are “millions of immunocompromised Americans, about 3 to 4 percent of the U.S. population, for whom the shots may not work fully, or at all… Emerging research shows that 15 to 80 percent of those with certain conditions, such as specific blood cancers or who have had organ transplants, are generating few antibodies.”

          https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2021/05/18/immunocompromised-coronavirus-vaccines-response/

          Serious question: what exactly is the big burden of getting a vaccine, if literally millions of people’s lives could depend on it? “Sucks to suck,” really?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “What would make someone medically ineligible?”

          @multicam – it would be a short list.

          Allergies to any component of a vaccine would be the main reason.

          Some cancer treatments mean you have to postpone getting vaccinated. In some cases it’s because the treatment suppresses your immune system to the point where the vaccine would be virtually useless. It’s a bit of a can of worms with some “blood” cancers but we already know what’s safe or not.

          Most immunocompromised people are medically suppressed. There’d have to be an assessment done by experts in those fields to see if a vaccine will work. It’s around 60% effective IIRC.

          There is debate around pregnant women or lactating women. Since both aren’t my area of expertise, I can’t honestly provide more clarity.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Is the Vaccine Safe for People with Autoimmune Diseases?

            Sandy Boek Werness, executive director of the McLean, Virginia–based Global Autoimmune Institute, an advocacy organization supporting research into and education about autoimmune diseases, says “there’s currently no concrete data to elucidate how the immune system responds to the (COVID-19) vaccine specifically in those with autoimmune disease.”

            Whether vaccines are effective in people with autoimmune disease is a more difficult question to answer because “patients treated with systematic immunosuppressants or immune-modifying drugs” were excluded from some or all phases of clinical trials of the Pfizer-BioNTech and the Moderna vaccines, says Dr. Anca D. Askanase

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @slavuta –

            The question was, “Is the Vaccine Safe for People with Autoimmune Diseases?”

            You just posted information about whether or not it works. One needs a functioning immune system to respond to a vaccine. The best way to keep immunocompromised people safe is to get everyone else vaccinated. That’s the whole idea behind “herd”immunity.

            Is it safe? Most “non-allergic” people are safe taking Tylenol for a headache. Whether or not it works is a different story.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Lou_BC

            Most likely, people with autoimmune diseases will not have this vaccine working for them because these people take immunosuppressants. They even advised to stop such medication for certain period after a shot. But if you give this vaccine to a person who does not take such medication and has active AI process, this person might be in trouble.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          “Is that even a significant number of people? What are we talking about here numbers wise? What would make someone medically ineligible?”

          Allergic reactions to vaccine ingredients or immunocompromise. Those two things combined are probably a few million people. If most of the other eligible adults get vaccinated, no problem. If enough poorly informed antivaxxers decide to $hit in the pool, those people are hosed. That’s especially true because at least the immunocompromised ones are some of the most vulnerable to start.

          “But now you’re telling me I STILL need to feel guilty about not getting it? Dude… no.”

          Yes. You do need to feel guilty. It’s not about you, it’s about protecting others. Like every other vaccine has been for the last century, which worked great until the dumb-as-rocks hippies in California compromised herd immunity and let measles and mumps back into circulation.

          • 0 avatar
            multicam

            dal, I appreciate vaccines and have gotten all of the ones I was supposed to growing up. That’s fine. I’m sure I’ll get the COVID vaccine eventually. I just think that people like you and Astigmatism blaming people who you know nothing about for the deaths of millions is a little hyperbolic.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I have been keeping a file with places to visit on my next big road trip. CA, NV, AZ, NM, OK, TX and LA (and parts of UT and CO) are in play for this one. Since everyone and her brother are itching to travel right now, my trip will probably be postponed (again, still) until Fall 2021 at the earliest. [Here’s hoping that the recently-developed (and very intermittent) transmission hiccup behaves itself (replaced both speed sensors in the transmission and it may have helped).]

    When I see crowds, I usually go the other way, so not in a hurry for this one.

    Was recently traveling with family members for other reasons and dragged them through Muscle Shoals AL with drive-bys of Fame Recording Studios, 3614 Jackson Highway Studio and the old Ford Motor Company plant in Listerhill. Little detours like that are a good time for me [not so much for my family]. If you are interested in music, I highly recommend this documentary:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscle_Shoals_(film)

    Have gotten some superb travel recommendations in the past from TTAC, and would welcome some QOTD-type articles regarding travel destinations, great road recommendations and worthwhile stops along the way.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @TooGuy – I’ve been avoiding crowds too but being an introvert makes that easy. I’d like to visit an old friend on Vancouver Island. I haven’t been able to go since Covid.
      I’ve been racking up the kilometers on my dualsport bike. I’ve put close to 4,500 km on it since mid-April. 2/3 on gravel roads.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        @Lou_BC,

        “When I see crowds, I usually go the other way” is not a pandemic thing, it’s all-time thing for me. I just don’t like people. (Especially when they are glommed together in Lemming Mode.)

  • avatar
    dr_outback

    As a former VW/Audi/Porsche service advisor I am surprised that there weren’t greasy finger prints all over the headliner and trim. Haha!

    With that being said, I am always amazed at how intelligent everyone seems to be on the B&B until it comes to the costs involved in automotive service.

    If no one wants to pay the dealer to service their vehicle, then the dealer will have little to work with to hire, train and maintain talent. The vehicle manufacturers certainly don’t want to pay a tech enough time to make repairs. Some repairs pay as little as .3. (That’s 18 minutes for the layman.). So customer pay is the only way to turn a profit in many cases.

    But yet everyone wants a loaner for the day and a free car wash and really high end snacks AND then have the audacity to say that they have “a guy” who can do it cheaper.

    It simply amazes me that there are so many geniuses on this B&B who cannot grasp basic economic principles.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “With that being said, I am always amazed at how intelligent everyone seems to be on the B&B until it comes to the costs involved in automotive service. ”

      Then don’t sell a product with a comprehensive warranty. I don’t think the customers are the party failing to grasp economic principals here.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @dr_outback – It isn’t hard to find out what technicians are paid or to calculate “overhead”.

      I can go to a different shop and get a guaranteed quality repair done by a certified mechanic for a lot less than a dealership, that’s all anyone needs to know.

      It’s simple economics.

  • avatar

    Half of the comments in this thread is about traveling to India during pandemic. On the other hand it makes it easy to skip half of the thread and save time.

  • avatar

    And your other car is a Lexus GS350? In the nine years since I bought mine, it has required annual oil changes, a battery, and a new cruise control switch.

  • avatar
    renewingmind

    Well. We have put in over 7700 miles driving around the country so far since mid April and we are currently 2000 miles from home so I’d say we are firmly in the travel camp…

  • avatar
    nrd515

    I had a friend who for some reason, picked at the headliner in every vehicle he owned. Replacing them, and doing the job right, is/was an almost impossible task, from what I saw and later on, experienced for myself.

    First car I saw was a 70 Buick Regal GS. Nice car when he bought it, soon the headliner was hanging down, with duct tape on it as a bad choice of keeping it out of his face. Took it to the Buick dealer, and paid the body shop to replace it, and they totally messed it up. Puckers and folds, it was terrible. The dealer finally sent him to the other side of town to a trim shop, and they got it right. Until he picked at it again. Next one was a ’75 Vega, as he went “economy” for couple of years. Same deal as the Regal. Awful job on it, and off to another trim shop for a do over. Then came his ’78 Camaro. The only problem that car had that didn’t come from his awful driving was the headliner was bad before he got it. And him picking at it made it fall down both in the front and rear. Somehow, the dealer did it perfectly. Same dealer that had done the Vega about 4 years earlier. And then the worst of all. He bought a ’73 Challenger Rallye 340 in amazing shape in 1980, with only 12K miles on it.
    I did a tune up on it, and it ran very well. The only thing that wasn’t OK on it was the front brakes were warped, so a brake place I knew did them. Well, soon he had the headliner torn up and the local dealer assured him “We know what we’re doing!”. As it seemed most Las Vegas dealers were back then, they lied. Between the ripples, the bunching, and the amazingly potent smell of contact cement, it was just a mess. The body shop manager seemed shocked when he complained about it. “I don’t know what you want!”. We hunted down the trim shop that did the old Regal and the dealership eventually said they would pay for it. I moved away after the Challenger was finally done right, but his headliner misadventures have continued ever since.

    So a friend borrowed my 2010 Challenger for a weekend “test drive”. I got his older Grand Cherokee. So he comes over Monday morning and he says, “I had a little accident!”. He got into the back seat when his wife was driving and he tore the headliner just in front of the back window with some sort of 3 ring binder ring snagging it. He said, “I’ll pay for fixing it!”, and I said, “You have no idea what a huge pain in the ass it might be to get it done right!”. I took it to the dealership near work, not the one I bought it at, and that turned out to be a mistake. Terrible job, I don’t see how it could have been much worse. I balked right away, and they agreed to let me take it to a nearby trim shop and let them have a try. They screwed it up too! I finally took it to the dealership I bought it at, and the body shop guy assured me “You will be happy, he does a great job on that stuff!”. And he did. My only complaint was I had to drive my friend’s Grand Cherokee another 2 weeks until the car was done. The dealership that got the headliner perfect was unable to get the replacement R/T stripe on the front quarter even remotely close to the other side when they repaired my car after a fender bender. They assured me that would make it right, and call me when their “stripe guy” was coming in. They didn’t call, and when I finally asked about it, they said I waited too long. Screw ’em, they will never get any more business from me.

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