By on January 27, 2021

BMW

BMW has proclaimed the 2022 M5 CS Sedan, with 627 horsepower and 553 lb-ft of torque, to be the quickest and most powerful BMW production vehicle ever produced, with a claimed 0-60 time of 2.9 seconds and a top speed of 190 MPH. It will arrive in the U.S. in the second half of 2021.

BMW

Having recently updated the M5 for 2021, the M5 CS adds more power, performance, and all-important interior appointment exclusivity, and is 230 pounds less than the M5 Competition. Liberal use of CFRP materials boosts the power-to-weight ratio of an already-high M5, since the M5 CS’ S63 4.4-liter M TwinPower turbo V8 only netted 10 HP more than the M5. The torque band is more impressive, with 553 lb-ft from 1,800 to 5,950 rpm, wider than the M5 Competition by 90 rpm. Redline is 7,200 rpm, with high-pressure, direct fuel injection, liquid-to-air intercooling for the twin turbos, and an oil system with two pumps.

BMW

Coupled to an eight-speed M Steptronic automatic transmission with Drivelogic and the M xDrive all-wheel-drive system, the M5 CS at 2.9 seconds is 0.2 seconds quicker to 60  mph than the M5 Competition. With the standard M Driver’s Package, the top speed is 190 mph, which also includes a BMW driver’s training voucher. 4WD, 4WD Sport, and 2WD are the selectable xDrive modes. To further enhance driver control, the Dynamic Stability Control system offers three settings, DSC on, M Dynamic Mode, and DSC off.

BMW

Extraordinarily short shift times are promised, along with quick responses to accelerator input. The Drivelogic switch on the shifter gives you three more choices, efficient, sport, or track, rather than a manual transmission that would allow you to make all the permutations yourself. BMW’s description of the exhaust system is as eloquent as the tone itself, another choice of three options, efficient, sport, or sport+, plus an M Sound button that mutes the V8’s roar to an understated note.

BMW

10 percent stiffer springs, 0.2-inch lower ride height, increased negative camber, a firmer rear anti-roll bar, and tow-link ball-joint mounts are a part of the M5 CS’ chassis and suspension tuning. To take advantage of the lower ride height and no-cost optional Pirelli P Zero Corsa high-performance tires, there’s additional spring and Dynamic Damper Control tuning over the M5 Competition.

BMW

 The M5 CS uses carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) to shed weight, in the roof (standard on all M5s), vented hood, front splitter, mirror caps, rear diffuser, and rear spoiler. In the engine compartment, the nicest-looking BMW engine cover I’ve ever seen is made from CFRP. Reduced soundproofing also lowers the M5 CS’ bulk, but a quiet ride isn’t the objective in a car like this, is it?

BMW

For the first time, there are M carbon sport seats in front with matching bucket seats in the rear, covered in black Merino leather with Mugello red accents and contrasting red stitching. The front seats are new lightweight, heated, and electrically adjustable M carbon buckets with side bolsters, integrated headrests, and illuminated M5 logos. The two rear passengers each have their own individual seats, and all the headrests are imprinted with a map of the Nurburgring’s Nordschleife. Quite the finishing touch, wouldn’t you say?

BMW

At an MSRP of $142,000 plus a destination charge of $995, is this limited production four-seater a must-have in your garage?

[Images: BMW]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

31 Comments on “2022 BMW M5 CS – Quickest and Most Powerful Ever?...”


  • avatar
    micko4472

    Comments? Oh yeah. One presumes most of these will be leased, and I’m
    betting there’ll be a limit of about 5K miles per year. You’d be crazy
    to buy one unless you like to have your car in the dealer’s service bay
    very regularly. Direct injection, twin turbo?? An invitation to problems.
    Not to worry, though: BMW will be making lots of money on these things
    because the customers never learn.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Are the people buying a $143k limited-edition track sedan really worried about its long-term reliability though? This isn’t a 540i that someone is going to use for daily commuting.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I would totally DD it (if I had bought more GME).

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          With those seats?

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            And with 10% stiffer springs along with special tires I would assume it has a very harsh ride.

            This car seems to be an answer to a question nobody asked. The M2 Competition is the track car for BMW fans.

            I do like the dark green with bronze wheels.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            If I could do a seat swap, I would, but I’m not sure about those these days because of the sensors and airbags they put in seats.

            @JMII

            Cannot be any worse than the rubber band tires they put on the 24in wheels of the heavy ass fake SUVs. Such a great idea in the crumbling Northeast.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Anyone who goes out and buys a sedan, out of all things, as a track car, is so far gone off into loopyland that there’s likely no telling what figment of his insane imagination he may be worried about.

        Other buyer of fast sedans, even ones capable of acquitting themselves better than average for the class around a racetrack, bu them mainly for road use. And while 90210, like other zipcodes heavy on $143K sedns, may be one of the better places to break down, breaking down still sucks even there.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Is the M5 materially more likely to break down during the initial ownership period versus other $143K vehicles?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Probably not. I’d imagine this would be more maintenance-intensive and fussier than a regular BMW sedan, but probably not unreliable (think Giulia Quadrifoglio) per se.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          My E36 M3 sedan just sent me a text telling you to go to #%ll.

          • 0 avatar
            4onthefloor

            My E46 convertible did the same! If I didn’t know how to wrench it would be long gone. No major problems, but small ones, at the most inopportune times. It’s the last great BMW for the average guy IMHO. tithe newer ones in driven just don’t have the same steering feel. Mine is highly detailed, and I have had people ask me if I’m rich sometimes. No I tell them, your several years old Camry is worth more.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      Never learn? They learn that they love the car. It’s about having enough money that you can buy a car for reasons other than total cost of ownership. Obviously you’re not in that position.

    • 0 avatar
      johnnyz

      Ford rolls out DI TT motors all day long w/ 2.7 and 3.5.

      American exceptionalism and reliability!

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    “Liberal use of CFRP materials boosts the power-to-weight ratio”

    This vehicle is a featherweight at only 4,114 pounds (cnet.com weight figure).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_fiber_reinforced_polymer

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      This vehicle has 627 horsepower. A Tiger II tank from 1944 had ‘690’ horsepower (from a Maybach gasoline V12). The weight makes a difference. Power-to-weight is a real thing.

      [This is going to be on the test.]

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        “This vehicle has 627 horsepower. ”

        The crazy thing is that it’s underpowered next to its 1100hp competition. A second 0-60 slower too.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Who makes 1100hp gasoline luxury sedans with 1.9sec 0-60 times? For half-sane money?

          2.9 to sixty, is already completely nuts. At least in a big cruiser like this.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Model S Plaid and Plaid+. They’re quoting March delivery. $119,990 for 1020 hp and 1.99 0-60. $139,990 for 1100 hp 9.0 1/4 mile and sub 1.99 (can’t they just say 2.0) second 0-60 time. Lucid Air is in the 1,000 hp range too. Wouldn’t be surprised if the C8 E-Ray hit those numbers as well and maybe for less than the Tesla or Lucid. At the higher end, you can get a Evija or Rimac at 2000 hp. That’s what some diesel locomotives in the 19 40’s and 50’s were rated at.

            The Model S is now 410 to 520 miles range depending on the version.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            Gasoline…….

            Anyone can plug big electric motors into a battery and make it to 60, if barely, before the resulting jalopy either runs out of range, or goes into self preservation mode.

            In practical terms, the kind of power required for 2.9 0-60 in a big sedan, matters not from 0-60, but from 100-160, or above. Primarily on German freeays (at least among the law abiding). Which implies meaningful range at speeds up there. Not just making it to 60.

            For something to be interesting, it must at a minimum be relevant for something. Not just a na-na-na-na-na-na stunt.

          • 0 avatar
            4onthefloor

            @stuki
            Came here to say this. You beat me too it. For the autobahn, it’s perfect, though now they are limiting the areas where you can go flat out, according to friends in Germany. For our roads? Hahaha! Don’t worry though, our government will fix the roads! Hahaha! Nah we’ll rebuild the roads in some foreign country before we repair ours.

  • avatar
    gasser

    For the last 2 weeks, every time I log onto msn.com and ad/puff piece for the M5 CS pops up on one of the pages. It looks like the same blurb, but I have never read it. IDK who is interested in this car, but it isn’t me or anyone I know. With the small number of these that will be sold, I don’t even understand their marketing strategy. The only car less appealing to me than a new 2022 M5 CS, would be a used one in 2025.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Though I am not in a position to breathe on this car, let alone buy or – more likely – lease this car, and recognizing that styling is entirely subjective, I can say it’s one of the most attractive BMWs I’ve seen in a long time. I’m with the commenter above in that I love that color.

    Why did the “lesser” BMWs get saddled with that garish smashed butt-cheek grille when this one gets a relatively tasteful rendition of BMW’s trademark?

  • avatar
    downunder

    I still wonder what the thinking is behind the “Android tablet stuck on top of the dash” look for the info center. It makes look like an afterthought, instead of an integrated part of the vehicle. I know that it isn’t a BMW thing, just following the other sheep.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      I have to wonder if it’s similar to the reason why some automakers experimented with the centrally located gauge cluster at eye level. Keeps everything in view and draws less attention from the road.

      I’m ambivalent to the trend really, having had Mazdas of late. Their implementation seems to be better than others, but I might be biased as I’ve not yet driven another vehicle with a different implementation.

    • 0 avatar
      4onthefloor

      Thought about that too, but where else can you put it? Especially with screens getting larger.

  • avatar
    Boff

    My recollection is that the M3/M4 CS was a bust. At least they left the center armrest on the M5 CS. Only Porsche it seems can get away with decontenting their cars while charging much more for tiny increments in performance.

  • avatar
    EX35

    I wonder how a used Chevy Ss + suspension/brake upgrades + procharger would compare?

  • avatar
    johnnyz

    Let us not forget the previous v10 M5 and those darn connecting rod bearings.

    Silly bmw.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • mcs: @Garak: It would also be good for search and rescue. In a search, with a gas model, the noise could drown out...
  • Garak: I could see quite a few places where you’d might want an electric model. Countries with expensive gas,...
  • DungBeetle62: Don’t know whose apple my Dad polished but in the early 80s after a parade of awful Cutlasses...
  • JD-Shifty: lowest gas prices were under Clinton. But that’s none of my business. We’ve seen wild price...
  • Buickman: anyone notice AutoNews has eliminated their comment section?

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber