By on December 23, 2020

After a COVID-induced delay of several months, Amazon finally released The Grand Tour’s new episode “A Massive Hunt” on December 17th. Its intended release date was the 18th, but someone at Amazon decided to foist the episode on an unsuspecting public a day early.

What a dumpster fire.

Before you read any further, be advised this article contains spoilers of the episode. You’ve been warned!

The second episode of The Grand Tour’s new format sees the trio of elderly millionaires return to car-related tomfoolery after the boaty “Seamen” of December 2019. While the boat episode was watchable, it was instantly a sort of write-off, not reflective of the show’s true subject. Unfortunately, “A Massive Hunt” isn’t even half as good. The guys head to the French island of Réunion in three very lightly used cars: a Bentley Continental GT (Clarkson), a Caterham 7 (May), and a Ford Focus RS (Hammond). They know there’s a challenge incoming, but what could it be? First, time for a pointless and beautifully filmed drag race.

Turns out the task is a treasure hunt. Viewers are presented with a story about a pirate in the late 18th century, La Buse, and his buried treasure. A letter from the pirate in question also appears which, encoded, requires James May and his decoder pen. The show diverts for the next 10 minutes or so in its poorly written script as viewers watch James pretend to decode the pirate letter. Turns out the treasure is on Madagascar instead, a place for which the cars must be modified in ridiculous ways.

After finding a workshop to modify the cars, the camera cuts to (presumably a week) later, and all three cars have completed modifications. There’s no shots of the guys working on the cars, no mention of the cost of each car initially, and no mention of how much the work cost. We’re not in that Top Gear universe anymore. Three hosts approach cars they have no attachment to, didn’t have to search out on a low budget, and didn’t modify themselves. The work done on the cars is clearly very professionally completed, and fairly extensive. Oh well, let’s move on.

Madagascar is easy to traverse at first to allow for jokes, then roads run out and the going gets difficult. Clarkson proves that if you spend a lot of money on a very expensive car, it’s not that difficult after all. Hammond discovers that applying complicated tank tracks to a Ford Focus makes it unreliable for rough terrain. And May discovers that when presented with an off-road tropical challenge, a roofless Caterham isn’t the best for protection from the elements.

The corny, ridiculous script shines through everywhere. Conversations are clearly practiced well in advance, with no room left for improvisation. The guys spend almost no time together during their travels, and when there’s an overnight stop it’s at a luxurious hotel. Again and again, the episode reminds viewers this is a very well-funded show, and the presenters have all been doing this for a very long time.

And it’s so stale. The rigid plot isn’t believable or interesting, and it builds to a non-climax: A final treasure hunt occurs on a beach, and by that time our hosts don’t really care about the lines they’re supposed to deliver. Clarkson “randomly” decides to “build a shelter,” which is a bar that’s completed in no time, made with building supplies that have British hardware store stickers on them.  The dialogue has our protagonists projecting the same schtick they’ve used since circa 2010, but with the added nuances of them not caring, and being highly overpaid. The sole redeeming quality of this mess is the camera work, which is fantastic as always. The crew really deserve awards for their skilled filming of the locations to which the show travels.

An hour and a half after it started, “A Massive Hunt” proves itself a massive flop. Its actors no longer care and have no new material to cover. They recite the same tropes everyone had memorized in 2012, but the accompanying aspects that made the show enjoyable in its past incarnations have disappeared. These adventures are no longer cheap car challenges, and watching hosts spend unlimited money doesn’t have quite the same charm. The unscripted screwups have no place here, in this carefully orchestrated play which begins and ends after all the expected boxes are ticked. Cars are a background player, there because the hosts need something to cause problems. Otherwise, it’s just an HGTV travel show.

Unfortunately, The Grand Tour no longer carries any of the Top Gear magic it’s been trying to resuscitate since 2016. The new format severed any ties with the “plucky little car show” of 2003 that grew into a global juggernaut. I’d say it’s time for retirement, but we all know there’s too much money involved for that to happen. I guess if I want fun and innovative car content, I’ll turn over to YouTube instead.

[Images: Amazon]

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70 Comments on “The Grand Tour’s “A Massive Hunt” Episode Sums Up a Show Well Past its Prime...”


  • avatar
    The80SeriesWillOutliveUsAll

    …so what are some recommendations for fun and innovative car content on YouTube?

    • 0 avatar
      Stanley Steamer

      Somehow I’m addicted to Regular Car Reviews. Certainly innovative; car reviews from a philosophical point of view.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        I was going to suggest RCR myself; it’s not appointment viewing or anything, but it is a nice way to burn up an hour or so. I’d prefer a balance tilted more towards car reviewing than philosophy, but that’s me.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      I’ve enjoyed M539 Restorations lately (guy with a bit of a smartass streak fixes up ’90s-’00s BMWs for fun; he lives in Germany so he can get parts without going bankrupt).

    • 0 avatar
      Davekaybsc

      Throttle House! They I think are probably the closest thing to what TG once was. They joke around a bit, but not so much that it gets annoying. Thomas is a racing driver and has real talent behind the wheel, unlike most YouTube hosts. They do fun episodes comparing new vs. old – the Maybach and Bentley GT ones were really interesting. Their camera work is also top notch. I enjoy watching Straight Pipes as well, but TH is a lot more grown up and a lot more professional IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      escapenguin

      My favorites in no particular order: Vice Grip Garage, Junkyard Digs, Hoovies Garage, savagegeese, RCR, Tedward, Winding Road Magazine

    • 0 avatar
      ProKras

      If you like the classic Top Gear format (3 friends doing challenging things with cars) but with fresh faces, palpable chemistry, and YouTube budgets and production schedules, check out “Car Trek” on Tavarish’s channel. It’s a hoot

    • 0 avatar
      Snooder

      Tavarish, Vinwiki, and Hoovies Garage teamed up recently to do a Top Gear Special type show called Car Trek.

      It’s actually pretty good, feels like the same good chemistry as the old Top Gear.

    • 0 avatar
      jagerninja

      Mighty Car Mods. Always Mighty Car Mods.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Hoovie’s Garage, Uncle Tony’s Garage, Straight Pipes isn’t bad most times. I used to like Doug Demuro but he got big and the cars he reviews now are so expensive I feel like you should have to swipe a credit card even be able to watch those. There are several others, many of which certainly are better than this dreck.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I watch SVRA whenever they broadcast races, otherwise I’ve found most car channnels on youtube to be loathsome, too much yackin’ and way too much clickbait.

    • 0 avatar
      Eaststand

      Hoovies Garage is great

    • 0 avatar
      Garrett

      Savage Geese is one of the best car review channels out there. It’s like the snarky, salty older brother to The Straight Pipes.

  • avatar
    Fred

    After you’ve seen a show a 100 times or so, it kind of loses it’s appeal. Doesn’t help that it’s on a service I don’t subscribe too either.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “The dialogue has our protagonists projecting the same schtick they’ve used since circa 2010, but with the added nuances of them not caring, and being highly overpaid.”

    I agree.

    “I guess if I want fun and innovative car content, I’ll turn over to YouTube instead.”

    Leno’s garage is great. A few places strike a decent balance (Alex on Autos, TFL, KBB). Some others have flashes of greatness but host personalities get in the way (RCR, Straightpipes, Throttle House, Savage Geese). A few people are trying *way* too hard (DeMuro, Hoovie, Tavarish). And then there is click bait garbage (most “tuner” and “exotics” channels).

    • 0 avatar

      I tried to enjoy a couple Straight Pipes reviews but they’re too busy trying to be cute with one another and securing future press vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        They do spend too much time being cute with each other (although this is a problem with nearly every team/group, probably everyone trying to be the next Top Gear). Now that they’ve “made it” they have also gone a little too goofy with their recommendations (“why not just get the 911 GT3 instead?”) and do seem too interested in getting higher end press cars.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      No love for Hoovie, Ajla?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Too much acting and too much thumbnail clickbait. The guy is obviously not a giant clown in his daily life so just be normal, I don’t need to watch a character. I think he does it do avoid class envy from his viewers.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I haven’t tuned in recently but I saw him as a more jovial alternate universe me. Classy envy, how?

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I like his taste in cars, but a lot of the acting is just too much (jumping into the “Car Wizard”‘s arms, pretending like he doesn’t know how to use a wrench). The videos with his daughter are nice because he acts more normal and less like a cartoon.

            With the “class envy”, he’s a fairly wealthy guy (especially for his age) and his family is fairly wealthy too. I think he tries to offset some of that appearance to the YouTube plebs by acting especially inept.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Ajla

            I could tell in a few vids he obviously had his dealer lic even though I think he said he got out of that game (KS is prob less stupid about lics than most states). But the tip for me was him talking about his Gram’s grey market SL560 which I think he inherited. That’s serious money in the 80s, probably oil/nat gas in family given where they are located. But, what’s a successful YT channel pay? Can’t imagine its peanuts. Plus its all a deduction, his whole life is probably deductible outside of his house… not to mention KS and OK are cheap as hell compared to even where I live. I think he’s in part a character but not 100% fake, but perhaps he’s the son of Thurston Howell, III, playing a role I dunno.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I don’t begrudge his or his family’s success but I do think it is a motivator for a lot of his goofing around.

            His Turbo R being a repair diva basket case also crushed my dreams.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I like Hoovie, even though it’s all fake. And, yes, I do think he’s just as big a dork in real life as he is in those videos.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Check out “Curious Cars.” The guy’s a car dealer, so he’s basically advertising the stuff he’s filming, and he’s not much of a “video host,” but he’s put up some AWESOME older survivor cars that are all in great condition.

      This one, in particular, should cause an instant car-gasm for anyone with a malaise-era road boat fetish:

      youtube.com/watch?v=up0nXgxTMmY

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Yea, I’ve watched some of CC and it is a decent channel. “CearalMarshmallows” used to do videos like that years ago, but he then drifted into only doing mega beaters and hillbilly stuff. Saabkyle did a lot of old stuff too in the past.

        This is more my style anyway:
        youtube.chttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-sjhT6nt5Iom/watch?v=n-sjhT6nt5I

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Makes me sad to see something with the Engine of the Almighty – they just towed my old Buick away the other day. My kid got rear-ended in it, and the insurance company totaled it out. Damned if it wasn’t still running and drivable, though. In fact, the ONLY time that car was ever on a tow truck was the time it got hauled away.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            That’s sad but at least the engine or parts of it will likely live on. A LeSabre is a just a vessel for the 3800.

            I haven’t owned a Buick V6 vehicle since early 2015 now. I’ve been keeping my ear to the ground for either a Grand Prix Comp G or a 2-door something but nothing good yet.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @ajla

            When I make my millions I shall create a grand Popemobile: a G-Body L67 Riv with a 4T80 transaxle.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    That’s too bad. Classic Top Gear was a must see in our household and the only show that every member of the family including those who did not even drive enjoyed.

    The key ingredient was the interplay between the three.

    The reason that I joined Amazon Prime was to watch The Grand Tour. Although with the pandemic it was useful to retain that membership.

    Yes the Grand Tour has had its ups and downs. Some clips were well below Classic Top Gear quality.

    However watching Top Gear after Clarkson, May and Hammond left was like watching a bad cover band. We just stopped.

    Hopefully the issues with this episode of The Grand Tour were pandemic related and they can experience at least a partial renaissance before retiring.

    And despite the review, yes I will watch this episode. But probably follow it up by watching one of their classic episodes such as the Vietnam trip, search for the source of the Nile or trip through Syria or building a bridge over the river.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Interesting take. You are, of course, completely wrong, but interesting none the less.

    • 0 avatar

      Awaiting your reasoned contradictory argument?

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Hope you have about 10 years on your hands…

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Interesting that you want a reasoned response when you didn’t give a reasoned explanation why this show is last it’s prime.

        They have literally stuck to the same formula that made them what they are. You have a very well shot, fun, and witty, and funny show that is a nice way to escape the world for an hour and a half.

        You’re the type of person to rip on AC/DC for sticking to what made them famous. It’s called success.

        There is nothing close to this on YouTube or regular TV. The stuff on YouTube, while decent, shouldn’t even be talked about in the same company with TG or TGT.

        And little Mikey don’t be so bitter all the time. It’s, frankly, pathetic.

        • 0 avatar

          I did explain why it’s past its prime. You just have to read the words, all the way to the end.

          Saying “it’s literally the same as always” means you’re not paying enough attention to what it is today.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Yep. Read it a couple times. Excusing the rather clumsy writing you still fail to establish why this show, which features a tried and true formula, is objectively worse than the other shows they have done.

            Further, you have no idea what type of concessions they had to make due to the plandemic affecting the end product. But continue to complain.

          • 0 avatar

            I’ll copy paste for you, just this once.

            “And it’s so stale. The rigid plot isn’t believable or interesting, and it builds to a non-climax: A final treasure hunt occurs on a beach, and by that time our hosts don’t really care about the lines they’re supposed to deliver. Clarkson “randomly” decides to “build a shelter,” which is a bar that’s completed in no time, made with building supplies that have British hardware store stickers on them. The dialogue has our protagonists projecting the same schtick they’ve used since circa 2010, but with the added nuances of them not caring, and being highly overpaid. The sole redeeming quality of this mess is the camera work, which is fantastic as always. The crew really deserve awards for their skilled filming of the locations to which the show travels.

            An hour and a half after it started, “A Massive Hunt” proves itself a massive flop. Its actors no longer care and have no new material to cover. They recite the same tropes everyone had memorized in 2012, but the accompanying aspects that made the show enjoyable in its past incarnations have disappeared. These adventures are no longer cheap car challenges, and watching hosts spend unlimited money doesn’t have quite the same charm. The unscripted screwups have no place here, in this carefully orchestrated play which begins and ends after all the expected boxes are ticked. Cars are a background player, there because the hosts need something to cause problems. Otherwise, it’s just an HGTV travel show.”

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “I’ll copy paste for you, just this once.”

            Thanks for reposting your diatribe. It doesn’t change the fact that you’re completely wrong. When people can watch it and not touch their phones for an hour and a half you know it’s a massive success. It’s highly enjoyable and accomplishes it’s mission, much to your dismay.

          • 0 avatar

            Engaging with you has been fun.

            I used to love the show, now I don’t. It’s okay to disagree on its current state. It doesn’t mean the person writing a critical review of something another likes is jealous, wishes them ill, or any of that. I just don’t like it.

            Just as when someone likes the show, it doesn’t mean they’re devoid of critical thinking skills or memory of the greatness the show used to have.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    New Top Gear is better now Matt le Blanc is no longer involved. The Grand Tour was very disappointing and I have to say I think the trio are somehow worse off for now being on the BBC anymore. Think about it Amazon is generally a bit lane anyway. Netflix does a much better job.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d say Netflix has more to choose from, but Amazon has some really good good stuff – “The Expanse,” in particular, is amazing. Also love me some Mrs. Maisel, LOL…

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I was never a big “Top Gear” fan to begin with. Mainly it has to do with Jeremy Clarkson – the guy just strikes me as an a-hole who got famous for being an a-hole. YMMV, I guess.

    But I did try out the first episode of “The Grand Tour,” and found it to be more of the same, just on a higher budget, as Corey says.

    Favorite streaming car show is definitely “F1: Drive To Survive.” It’s absolutely first class car porn, particularly if you have a 4K TV.

  • avatar
    JMII

    It was funny but totally predictable. The show is no longer Top Gear, its the Grand Tour and this is the new format like it or not. The wife and I still watch, but the number of LOL moments are going down. At this point its more about the locations, its basically a travel show with 3 guys you already know and some odd / interesting cars used to move the plot along. Its not “bad” but the format is limiting.

    TG went from being a not-so-serious car review show into a 3 guys doing random stuff with cars, to a travel show involving cars. Somewhere in the middle the mix was perfect and the show peaked, but now its swung too far from the original format.

    What is really killing them now is that each episode is like a mini-movie that takes months to produce. The delay between episodes is just too long to hold interest. At this point another Star Wars show or movie will arrive before the next Gran Tour adventure.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    “A show well past its prime”?

    The lame and contrived Grand Tour never had a prime.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I think part of the issue is that they’re all getting older and just aren’t feeling it anymore. Many of the antics do feel forced at this point, but it’s a known quantity and ultimately the ratings will decide if the show continues on past whatever they’re calling a season or two more. I enjoyed the episode, but I’m also one who perpetually rewatches the same things over and over. Most of the gags were ones you could see coming a mile away, but it was fun.

  • avatar
    lstanley

    There were some laugh out loud moments for sure but I also can’t recall what they were as I type this…… maybe that is some indicator of the quality or lack thereof of the Grand Tour vs classic Top Gear.

    Here is where this one went wrong: it was 45 minutes of the same shot of traversing muddy roads and for the first time in a long time I was just bored watching it. I like the idea of the Bentley especially, and was impressed with the Caterham for sure, while the Ford left me a bit meh. This would have been a much cooler muddy road adventure if they each rolled in a classic Land Rover.

    If it was me, and it’s not, I would have done the adventuring and the driving on Reunion and not shipped over to Madagascar. Reunion looks just as spectacular as Madagascar, at least if the show was going to be mostly about a green tropical island and beaches.

    Regardless, I will watch each episode as they come out. Unlike so many, I still enjoy the three of them, Clarkson especially, and will be sad when the inevitable cancellation comes….

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    I have read that Amazon Web Services is so insanely profitable that it allows Bezos to splurge on vanity loss leaders, like Amazon video.

    But to one of the World’s richest men, it gives him the privilege to cavort with celebrities.

    Who says money can’t buy you love?

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Amazon video is also probably just a carrot to drive more Prime subscriptions, and drive more normal Amazon business (if you’ve already got the delivery service paid for, why not use it?). It doesn’t have to be a money maker in the same way as other streaming services, if it helps them earn more elsewhere.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    eh. Enjoyable regardless.

    But if the world turns such that I turn on the TV and see DeMuro standing there squeaking “THIS is the…” while spreading his arms, my TV will have three bullet holes in it within a couple of seconds–and that will be the end of TV for me.

  • avatar
    Derived

    People have been saying this about this show and TG before it for over a decade now…and almost every time, it usually boils down to an internet blogger complaining that some “rich old white men” are more famous and more successful then they are at this line of work.

    Not sure if that’s ultimately what you’re getting at, but I don’t really know what you expect. The whole thing is just supposed to be tongue-in-cheek, fun, not taken super seriously. That was always the point. The journey is the destination. You weren’t supposed to get any unknown, profound knowledge out of watching this. You were just supposed to feel the way you feel when you screw around with some old friends on a trip for a weekend. That’s really what it is. Is it fresh, cutting edge and lighting the world on fire? No, it’s not. It’s not supposed to. And many of us don’t expect that from it.

    Having said all that, yes, I would have done a few things a bit differently. And I would like to see them go a bit “back to their roots” once in a while to keep it truly entertaining. But overall, I think for a long time now, their work has best been approached as a travel show with a particular emphasis on cars, with some rather tongue-in-cheek but (I think, at least) funny bits thrown in once in a while. That’s what I expect, and that’s what they delivered.

    • 0 avatar

      Compare, for example, the old TG specials or segments featuring cheap cars

      Africa
      Africa Wagons
      Vietnam
      Thailand
      Cheap Italian Exotics
      Cheap Coupes
      Alfa Romeos
      Police Cars

      to this, and then you’ll see the issues. None of those were super serious – and I agree that was the point. But they were fun to watch, some good entertainment, and had presenters who wanted to present a show.

      This doesn’t have any of those things. They’re tired of doing it.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Recently went through an extensive phase of re-watching Top Gear episodes, and also ran across some ‘behind the scenes’ material on how the show was made.

    Top Gear peaked awhile back. For a few seasons it was genuinely funny, instructive, and watchable with the whole family. (An earlier phase was awkwardly fixated on phallic references and introduced us to Jeremy’s pervy side with some of the guests – ick.) The Grand Tour peaked relatively early and has been on a slow fade.

    [Exercise for the reader: Which phase corresponds to TTAC’s current state – no, nevermind – too depressing.]

    Agreed that Jeremy Clarkson is Generally Not The Nicest Person On The Planet. But he is also without question the motivating genius behind the peak years of the show. The team went to ridiculous lengths to prep and polish the show in a way that came off as spontaneous (some of the lines were held back until the actual shoot, and so actually were spontaneous to a point). [There are other Genuises Who Aren’t So Nice In Person – e.g., Simon Cowell, Jeff Bezos. But they do have real talent.]

    Like Peak Car and Driver long ago (the writers and the readers who wrote Letters), Peak Top Gear had an opinion – a well-formed opinion based on actual thought, experience and reflection – and clearly expressed that opinion, but didn’t expect the rest of the world to automatically fall in line with it. [A potential lesson there for all of us.]

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Overall a nice, intelligent discussion. An enjoyable read. Thanks.

    Perhaps the fact that they have an almost unlimited budget and too much time to fill/put the show together means that they have lost some of the tight editing and ‘spontaneity’?

    Much like some director’s cuts where the director’s ego has gone too far?

  • avatar
    Goatshadow

    Agree entirely with the review. This episode was a flop. The Vietnam boat episode had so many good moments and had a decent rewatch value. This had none of either.

  • avatar
    jmo2

    “ The second episode of The Grand Tour’s new format sees the trio of elderly millionaires return to car-related tomfoolery”

    That’s why I love them. It’s also why I’ve moved so much of my auto media consumption to YouTube. The youtubers make $100s of thousands to millions and can easily afford to buy the cars they review. The same is especially true for TGT.

    My consumption of blogs has declined because they are mostly populated with bitter jealous impoverished hacks.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “ My consumption of blogs has declined because they are mostly populated with bitter jealous impoverished hacks.”

      That’s exactly what’s going on here. The three boys are successful and putting out wonderful content and some fee the need to drag it down simply because they didn’t like it. Pathetic.

      • 0 avatar

        “… fee [sic] the need to drag it down simply because they didn’t like it.”

        You’ve discovered the point of a critique and/or review, and I congratulate you for this discovery.

        Successful /= good

        And the “YOR JUST JEALOUS!!1!!1!” argument is as facile and childish a “rebuttal” as humanly possible.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    Sadly, Amazon has pruned away most of the fun parts of the show. While I enjoy the adventures, I really miss Celebrity Brain Crash and Conversation Street. The decision to axe the tent and all its segments was, in my opinion, a mistake.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Redeeming aspects of this episode:
    • The shark jump joke (worth the price of admission)
    • Brexit references [extremely timely]
    • World’s most expensive motorway
    • Seeing the ‘tank tracks’ in actual use

    (My nuclear family enjoyed the ‘National Treasure’ slant, and actually made it through the entire episode without regressing to smartphones [a lofty goal, rarely achieved])

  • avatar
    Jingo_Balls

    I think the author missed the point of the show. This episode was absolutely a caricature of itself, intentionally so.

    The conversation between Hammond and Clarkson on the beach summed it up through the setup that culminated in, “…well, if there is a shark, we could just jump it” / “I think we did that in 2013.”

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I feel like a big difference between TG and GT, is that the former had to deal with BBC execs and TV rules. GT is just Amazon laundering money to a few old rich guys so they can go on vacations.

    I did make the mistake of trying to watch some of Mays “our man in Japan”, that one was awful. Stick to toys James.

  • avatar
    07NodnarB

    Two words, three syllables: MOTORWEEK!!! Retro or new (especially retro) you just can not go wrong.

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    Regarding these episodes of The Grand Tour being pandemic-related: Is that somehow related to Jeremy Clarkson contracting COVID-19?

    https://deadline.com/2021/01/jeremy-clarkson-coronavirus-battle-sunday-times-the-grand-tour-1234664076/

  • avatar
    Svoboda123

    I raised my son on Top Gear- sadly stale now its true. But hard to replace for those with a brain or over the age of 23. U.S. & U.K. recent versions SUCK (but Chris Harris rocks). Savagegeese are gret reviews, but zero fun. Wheeler Dealers on MT are Brit humor fun but mechanics, not reviews. Throttle House is okay but you need budget to do hilarious car-destroying things. Motorweek is a HUGE yawn. I don’t see anything even close.

    FYI: Season 14, a great one, is free streaming on Prime of late.

  • avatar
    renewingmind

    > While I enjoy the adventures, I really miss Celebrity Brain Crash and Conversation Street…

    You might be the inky over person in the universe to miss celebrity brain crash. What a waste of minutes that was.

    Grand Tour isn’t nearly as good as peak Top Gear was, but it’s miles better than post-Clarkson top gear. And I’d rather have grand tour than no grand tour if we can’t have the show we loved.

    YouTube can be fun, I do like car trek and enjoy hoovie, Doug demuro and tavarish, but it’s nowhere near the same level of show.

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