By on October 26, 2020

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, LH front view - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars
Not long ago, I became curious about the production longevity of the good old three-speed automatic transmission in North America. The first really successful true automatic had four forward speeds and the two-speed Powerglide delivered the slushbox to the masses, but the three-speed Detroit automatics of the 1960s truly converted the continent to the two-pedal religion. During the last couple of decades of the 20th century, the three-speed got sidelined by more sophisticated transmissions. What was the final new car you could buy with a three-speed transmission in North America? That’s today’s Junkyard Find: a 2002 Toyota Corolla CE, found in Denver last week.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, rear view - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsMy search for the last three-speed-equipped new car (yes, car — three-speeds stayed in trucks a bit longer here, and that’s a story we’ll discuss later) took months of poring over sales brochures, EPA data, reference books, and online comments from your enraged uncle who clearly remembers his neighbor buying a 2005 Cavalier with a three-speed. In the end, the winner of the Keep That Reliable Hardware In Service Forever trophy goes to — of course — Toyota. The 2002 Corolla CE and the base version of its NUMMI-built twin, the Chevrolet Prizm, had three-speeds, a year after Chrysler went to four-speed automatics in the Neon and Caravan and GM abandoned the three-speed in the Metro and Cavalier.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, automatic gearshift - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsToyota believes in selling stuff that works, regardless of current fashions and/or the derision of automotive journalists, which is why you’ll see that near-identical cruise-control stalk in so many Toyotas and Lexuses from the early 1990s through a few years ago. It’s also the reason that Toyota was the last holdout selling new cars with four-on-the-floor manual transmissions here (the 1996 Tercel). I’m working on pieces about the final three-on-the-tree and three-on-the-floor cars you could buy new, so check in later for those.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, decklid badge - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsToyota USA probably says “CE” stood for “Cheerful Edition” or “Competitive Edition,” but I’ve always believed that the C in this badge stands for Cheap. The CE-badged Toyotas lacked the luxury features of their upscale brethren, but they were Toyotas and they would do that Point-A-to-Point-B thing like no-hassle clockwork, for decades. Sure, you could get an ’02 Daewoo Nubira for much less than a Corolla CE, but then you’d have a Daewoo.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, overdrive switch block-off plate - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThat said, the fact that the CE got a 200-yen block-off plate in the spot where the overdrive button lived on the higher-end Corollas … well, it must have been a depressing sight when coupled with the view of that grim, forklift-seat-grade upholstery. Note the little rectangular indentation where the OVERDRIVE label would have gone in a Corolla S or LE or Prizm LSi.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsI think most of these cars were sold to fleet operators, not individual buyers torn between the Nubira CDX and the Corolla CE, and so the Super Indestruct-O gray interior was a strong selling point.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, decklid badge - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsMaybe a few years operating out of the Budget counter at DIA, then auctioned-off to a commuter who just wanted cheap, dependable wheels.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, wheel - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsSpeaking of wheels, dig these Nissan rims! Thanks to the magic of the ubiquitous 4x100mm bolt pattern, every junkyard offers dozens of affordable aluminum wheel choices to Corolla CE owners tired of their grimly utilitarian steelies.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, broken door handle - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe most annoying failure on the low-end Corollas and Prizms of this era was the finger-slicin’ busted door handle. Always the driver’s door, of course, and I’ve seen some innovative field-expedient repairs of this problem in junkyards.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, HVAC controls - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsWhat’s this? Air conditioning? 2002 Corolla CE buyers could get the “Extra Value Package,” which added A/C, a cassette deck, and a digital clock. Since rental-car customers were getting soft by the early 2000s, Budget Rent-a-Car must have felt compelled to fork over a few extra bucks on this car.

2002 Toyota Corolla CE in Colorado junkyard, window crank - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsEven with its gray-on-grey-on-gray interior and 1965-technology transmission, this bargain-basement car got the job done for 18 years before getting discarded.


My fingers are stuck together!


Drive your dreams.


I’m pretty sure only the Budget Town Cars got the aromatherapy candles.


They had good drugs in those late-1990s Budget brainstorming sessions.


You sure this high roller wouldn’t prefer the Corolla CE and its bulletproof three-speed, rather than risking a Jaguar breakdown?

For links to 2,000+ additional Junkyard Finds, visit the Junkyard Home of the Murilee Martin Lifestyle Brand™.

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65 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 2002 Toyota Corolla CE, Last of the 3-Speed Automatics...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Whenever I think of a basic generic “car” this is the car that pops into my head. If there was a single car that I’ve paid little or nor attention to over the last 40 years, this is it… Well, there was that one time when it was grounded to the ground that made me laugh :)

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    I rather like those Nissan wheels.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    “Toyota believes in selling stuff that works, regardless of current fashions and/or the derision of automotive journalists.”

    Maybe this is why the 2020 Sienna I just bought this weekend can’t tell me the pressure in each individual tire, it just has the same idiot light on the dash that I remember from 20 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      One of my pet peeves – that’s just plain lazy. My 2013 Outback has the same idiot light. Subsequent generations now spill the state secret as to which specific tire needs air.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        I’d *somewhat* understand the cost cutting if this was a base model van. A 2020 stripped out Voyager I recently drove for work didn’t have automatic headlights (which I wasn’t sure was even legal in 2020).

        But my Sienna came with a lot of other fluff that I’d trade for a real TPMS in a heartbeat (radar cruise control, lane keep, auto braking, etc)

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        You know you can tell which tire needs air by looking at them. If one of them is low enough for that light to be on then that tire will look low. If more than one is low enough for the light then those tires will look low. If you can’t tell which tires look low and which ones don’t, then my advice is to look harder and pay more attention to your tires- as if your life depended on it.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          If your life depended on it, could you visually tell the difference between 35 psi and 28 psi when it’s dark outside? Because I’m humble enough to admit I can’t always. And I know my wife (who drives the vehicle daily) can’t.

          Yes, one could carry a pressure gauge and check them (and I do, since the van won’t tell me). But the entire point is that in 2020 that shouldn’t be necessary.

          But I’m always happy that know-it-alls are here ready to pounce on this as a personal failing instead of a cheap decision by Toyota.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            I can tell which front is low because the car pulls to that side when I hit the brakes. The rears are a little harder to tell.

            Or I just fill top off all of them.

            If you’ve already got your hands dirty topping off one tire then why wouldn’t you top off the rest? I’m always happy that know-it-alls blame someone else. ;)

            Don’t you love your wife enough to educate her about something this important? Or if computerized tire pressure monitoring is so important then why did you choose a vehicle without it? I guess either your wife’s safety isn’t as important as you imply or maybe you’re just looking to complain about your first world problems.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “Or I just fill top off all of them.” (edit won’t let me edit)

            Or I just top off all of them. If it’s a leak that’s bad enough that topping off the air won’t fix it, then yes it’ll be very obvious, with or without a pressure gauge. And if it’s not bad enough that the difference isn’t visually obvious, then I might as well top off both to make them even as well as the tires on the other axle while I’m at it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Oh, Jim, you’re so logical. The TPMS has spoiled me to the point I rarely look at the tires, but my complaint is that the idiot light doesn’t come on until the tire gets down to about 20psi, by that time I’ve already figured out that I have a problem.

            Cars do so much for us these days it’s really easy to get lazy and wait for the car to tell us that there’s a problem

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            “maybe you’re just looking to complain about your first world problems.”

            I thought this was patently obvious in the first post. I don’t make buying decisions on trivial matters like this, but I will complain about short-sighted and cheap decisions after the fact. Is it the end of the world? Of course not. Is it something that IMO should be included in every new 2020 vehicle? Yes.

            As far as my wife goes, she knows how to read a pressure gauge and fill a tire. She knows how to spot a tire that’s actually dangerous, not just low enough to make the light come on. I don’t think visually identifying 5-10 psi is a critical skill, and teaching her to fill every tire when one is a few pounds low just means she’ll have 3 that are overinflated.

            I’m sorry this became such a ridiculous argument because it was just supposed to be a fairly light hearted jab at Toyota.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            Jack- cheers, and sorry for turning into “that guy from the internet” on you.

            -Jim

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Oh, you’re that guy Jim? My internet has been running a little lean, any suggestions?

    • 0 avatar

      Car companies are sometimes weird. See my Wife’s Pilot EX-l missing memory seats.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      @jack4x It must be model-specific, or related to a platform refresh – my mother-in-law’s 2017 Camry XLE shows all the individual tire pressures. I would bet the 2021 Sienna shows them, since it’s new.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Like many (most) in Canada and the Northern USA we drive all winter with our ‘tire pressure’ light on because it is too much time/effort/cost to convert winter rims/tires to use with the automatic tire pressure sensor in the vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      I’d much rather have the simple speed-sensor-based TPMS. I don’t want to have to deal with sensors in my winter wheels, or the future maintenance of any of them.

    • 0 avatar

      That’s just being cheap, using the ABS to tell you one tire has just crapped, unlike TPM in each wheel. My Ace of Base Jetta S does it too.

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      This honestly isn’t a big deal if the maker is using an indirect TPMS method but what is maddening is if you’re paying for individual sensors, then it should at least display it.

      Even with indirect TPMS, many cars actually still tell you which wheel is throwing the light. Toyota or Subaru (at least my 2015), nope. You got a light. That’s it.

  • avatar
    DOHC 106

    One of my friends had one and it lasted until 220k and the power train started to give out. I would have prefered an old beater like this one: simple and basic vs my 2005 Nissan sentry which had problems till I finally got rid of it. The sentry had better rims and more features, but poor quality at least for my model year.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I worked for Enterprise in the mid-late 90’s as a car washer. The NUMMI cars and Toyota’s took rental abuse fairly well. But the three speed auto was not pleasant to drive, especially in western PA with lots of hills and odd traffic patterns. Sure, they were smooth and unobtrusive, but driving an inferior Hyundai Accent or Mitsubishi Mirage with a 4 speed auto was a much better driving experience.

    I sort of miss the lack of theatrics in simple 3,4 and even 5 speed automatics. There’s been a few times in my experience with multiple vehicles with 6+ gears I’ve thought “What is going on up there?”. Combine this with start/stop technology, it’ll be interesting to see the longevity of 2018+ vehicles going forward.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    And I would have thought the Cavalier was the last 3-speed auto…

    I’m looking forward to the last three on the tree and three on the floor. For cars, my sense is the 1979 Chevy Nova and 1979 Aspen/Volare are the last three on the tree. Three on the floor…could that be the 1976 Dart/Valiant? Or a later AMC Gremlin?

    Yep, we’ll see how the turbo, 10-speed, stop-start hold up. I think pink reliability/durablilty is 1995-2010.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I had one of these (complete with 3-speed slushbox) in ’98 Prizm LSi guise. Powertrain was fine, except for losing a radiator at around 50k or so. However the interior really started to fall apart around year 15. (I had sold it to my Dad around ’03 or so.)

    I do miss the blessed simplicity of those climate controls, and the Double-DIN Delco stereo in the Prizm was much easier to use than most units.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Nice writeup Murilee, thanks.

    “Keep That Reliable Hardware In Service Forever”…
    This week I got bored with the brake system on my 25-year old GM truck and decided a more modern GM truck braking system might be more interesting – so I disconnected the manifold vacuum line running to the brake booster.

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    Stalk Cruise Control – My current generation Lexus has that stalk and its more intuitive than any other CC controls that I’ve used. Worst CC control is probably the VW version from a few years back. Ford was pretty bad too. Not sure about the latest ones as I don’t get to rent cars any more due to COVID.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      Absolutely! So intuitive. I have lived with three Toyotas so equipped. The gestures are distinct, directional, and can be done blindfolded.
      It is so easy to make a mistake with the on the steering wheel buttons on my 2020 RAV. Every action is just a clicky press of little tightly spaced buttons. It takes far more mental and manual attention to ensure the proper button gets pressed.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Ironic because Toyota was an early leader in four speed automatics- a lot of their cars had those as an option in the early 1980s.

    • 0 avatar
      tomLU86

      The original (1983-84) Camry had a standard 5-speed manual or optional FOUR speed automatic.

      It was the first 4-speed auto on a mass-market 4-cylinder.

      The W123 Mercedes was the first four-speed auto (excluding various 1950s GM cars) that I am aware of, and as I recall, Ford had it as an option in the downsized 1979 LTD, and GM had it as an option in their full-sized cars in 1980. So equipped, a 1980 Caprice 305 got THIRTY highway mpg per Consumer Reports. I was a teen, and was very impressed with that! (Too bad GM wrecked the car’s appearance for 1980…)

      I understand automakers are a business and every penny counts, but I’m amazed at how long it took the US automakers, the automatic EXPERTS, to get to four-speed automatics, let alone GM offering TWO-speeds up until the early 1970s–talk about the arrogance of the Mark of Excellence….

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “So equipped, a 1980 Caprice 305 got THIRTY highway mpg per Consumer Reports.”

        Ironic that’s about as good as anything has been for the past thirty years save things like Prius or three cylinder gas motors.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          I would assume that CR, the official publication of squat to pee, tested at a safe and malaise-legal 55 mph in 1980.

          What doesn’t get spectacular mileage at a crawl?

          • 0 avatar
            gearhead77

            I remember this from old CR’s and maybe new ones. If you read their report, they’d have the EPA test and their numbers. There was usually wild swings IIRC.

            EPA numbers 15/22

            CR 9/15

            Now, we all know the EPA cycle, especially in the old days, was not representative of how people actually drive (and still isn’t). But they’d get something like the above and I don’t know how.

            I’ve never gotten less than a 2-3 mpg difference from the EPA numbers. Adjusting for the large amount of hills as well as stop and go traffic where I live as well as odd traffic patterns, I don’t think its unreasonable.

          • 0 avatar
            tomLU86

            Yes, most likely CR tested the car at 55mph. I really don’t remember. I do remember the THIRTY though, because 30 mpg was a milestone number.

            Even at 55, this was pretty impressive for a full-size car with an automatic.

            From the mid-70s to the late-70s, Consumer Reports had multiple mpg numbers, that fascinated me as kid. From the Feb 1977 issue (that I happen to have handy) for the “new” 305 Caprice, we have

            195-mile test trip: 17.5
            CITY: 10.5
            OPEN-ROAD: 20.0

            Constant Speed: 40mph give 21.5mpg
            50mph gives 21.0 mpg
            60mph give 19.5 mpg

            AND, to top it off, they had a fuel-use of $650 for 15,000 miles; that corresponds to 1,000 gallons or 15 mpg, which is the average of the first 3 figures.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            My 1965 Impala with the Powerglide is the answer to your question. That model had several engine options from the straight six to the 409 V8, and the best you could squeeze out of any of them (on the freeway!) was 12 MPG.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Funny you mention the door handles.

    A friend had a 2000 Prizm with the same ones, but it was his interior handles which snapped off regularly. It got so bad that I just bought a pack of 10 to replace them for him every few months until he got rid of the car.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Was there an appreciable real world difference in fuel economy between the 3 speed and the 4 speed? Was the theory that the amount you’d spend on gas would be made up for buying the cheaper car?

    I always wonder at what point it ceases to be worth adding options to a cheaper vehicle, when available, and just jumping up to the next trim level…

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Four vs three speed was sort of a little of everything- better highway economy and a bit less noise, smarter takeoff in first gear, less rpm drop in upshifts going up steep hills (made a big difference in low powered cars back then). I’m not sure you’d save a lot of absolute dollars in less gas money over the life of the car unless you did a lot of highway driving. City mileage wouldn’t be much different, if any.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Parted with my 2000 Corolla after twenty years, I miss it. It had only one by design annoyance; at twilight its white face dials were unreadable when their back lighting matched the ambient light and washed out the markings. This contrasts with my list of six built in annoyances in the 2020 RAV 4 that replaced it.

    My Corolla was the five speed stick (of course) and the power was quite adequate. I often pondered how badly having only three gears to work with must have crippled the powertrain performance. Way back when, I got to experience a 4speed stick vs a 2peed Powerglide Vega. As expected, the Powerglide model had higher highway RPMs and noise, far worse fuel economy, and far slower acceleration.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      “I often pondered how badly having only three gears to work with”

      Remember that a torque converter is effectively your first gear in an automatic. When really put your foot into it, a torque converter typically doubles the torque from what comes in from the engine to what goes out to the transmission input shaft. The first gear in a lot of three speed automatics is around 2.5:1 while the first gear in a lot of manuals is between 3:1 and 4:1. So what effectively happens is when you put an automatic in D or 1 and drive away normally, you briefly get a little bit more torque multiplication than you would in first in most manuals, then in the next few seconds it sort of mushes along into progressively less torque multiplication until the torque converter acts as what they call a “fluid flywheel” with a little bit of slip and effective no torque multiplication (i.e. 1:1).

      But the torque converter is what makes the difference between an automatic with very few gears from being practically undriveable to being practical. Without it, the car would accelerate off the line like when you start out in a manual in second or third gear.

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        Your reply is bringing up recollections of reading about the triple turbine Turboglide transmission. It was a fascinating concept, even as it was quite fuel inefficient.

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          Yep, exactly- fuel inefficient indeed. Until the carmakers perfected a reliable lockup torque converter then that’s what kept manuals alive and selling for so long.

  • avatar

    I would have guessed Neon off by one year.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    So this is a 1-VIN (NUMMI-built) car, right? I usually blame things like the monochromatic interior on GM’s influence.

    When I met my wife, she had a ’92 Corolla sedan, not DX or LE, so, the cheap version then. It was the three-speed auto, and had a/c. It was a Fremont car, and used a Delco alternator, which was the weak link on that car. It also didn’t have factory cruise, but instead a dealer-installed Rostra cruise control, which could never hold a steady speed, and instead hunted back-and-forth, 1-2 mph either way.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I had a coworker who owned the mid 96-7 base-grade Tercel with the four speed manual. Rubber floor coverings and the passenger side mirror was an option.
    I think the last three on the tree trucks were the 80’s era Dodge Ram vans which later dropped the manual well before they met their end by 2003. The pre 1994 D-series pickup as well as the Ford F-series had the three on the tree until the mid 80’s.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I distinctly remember a conversation with my girlfriend at the time about what the CE meant. She was gifted a 2000 Corolla and my memory is fading, but I think it was an LE. We were driving somewhere and wound up behind a CE version and she was concerned it was a nicer trim level. I wasn’t sure, but I thought it was the lowest trim.

    I eventually settled on CE standing for Consumer Edition and her Limited Edition was better.

    I would put $10k on her having no recollection of that conversation 17 years later, but I still think about it every time I see a Corolla after I check to see if it has the round high beams and backup lights to confirm it was her facelifted generation.

  • avatar

    Like your comment on the door handle, Murilee. I used to have that issue with the 84 Shelby Charger I owned. The handle always seemed to pull with very little resistance so it took me a few replacements before I tried lubricating it periodically. Used spray lube through the access holes to soak the pivot points and no more broken handles. Biggest DUH for me at the time. In examining the handle itself, it was cast with the “joint” in the cast at a poor place – right where the force applied while opening would put stress on the weakest point of the handle casting.

  • avatar
    boowiebear

    Doesn’t a 3-speed kill gas mileage with no overdrive negating the benefit of an econo-box? I had no idea 3-speeds last this long!

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Sometimes the four speed option comes with a shorter final drive ratio, so that sorta splits the difference between improved highway mileage and improved acceleration. It depends on the make/model/year and you’d really only know if you dug up the data. Some cars came with a variety of gearing over their lives, and what sold well one year to the next changed with the price of fuel.

      That’s a complicated way to say “well, yes, sort of.”

  • avatar
    Russycle

    How about 4-speed automatics, does anyone still offer one? I know Toyota used one in the xB until it sashayed off this mortal coil a couple years ago. Anything newer?

  • avatar
    conundrum

    So what actually killed this Corolla CE? Couldn’t find a mention in the text. I theorize a nearby neutron-shower nuclear explosion that fried the electrics. Or maybe the owner developed a case of terminal boredom with piloting an everyday cockroach after 18 years. Cuz the body doesn’t look too awful bad, as we say around here. Jeez, there are guys around these parts that do the dealer and tire store backlot patrol every day to find discarded skins with a sixteenth of legal tread and good for thousands of klicks of happy motoring. A perfect Corolla, with mag wheels, man! that needs only a pair of visegrips and a combination hammer/screwdriver to resuscitate would be gone from that scrapyard by tomorrow am, leaving everyone wondering “How’d they do that?”

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      That’s what I was wondering too. The body looks good and the interior isn’t bad. The drivetrain is about as durable (and replacebale from the junkyard) as you could imagine.

      I’d rule out the nuclear explosion – it would have ruined the paint – but electrical problems are probably the cause. It was mentioned above that the Delco alternator was a problem, and maybe like Ford, it was inadequate and kept getting replaced with another inadequate unit.

  • avatar
    sayahh

    Bought a MY2002 CE on New Years’ Eve 2001 for my dad. Figured he didn’t need a LE or a S since they all had the same engine, but I didn’t check the transmission and regretted it every day until I sold it in 2019 because gas prices in California are pretty high. Wanted a 2020 Corolla Hybrid but ended up getting a Camry.

    Toyota USA was pretty shady, and while it wasn’t quite a bait-and-switch, especially when the Monroney window sticker had the specs listed, I went in expecting the CE to have the same spec as, well, a CE trim model, which previously had a 4-speed transmission, but turned out that the 2012 CEs had more in common with the discontinued VE model, e.g., 3-speed auto transmission, than the old CE models. Btw the Canadian CE trim model retained the 4-speed transmission.

  • avatar

    That’s just being cheap, using the ABS to tell you one tire has just crapped, unlike TPM in each wheel. My Ace of Base Jetta S does it too.

  • avatar
    Polka King

    I thought my 2012 Hyundai Pontiac-Vibe-Clone had a three-speed automatic. There’a only 1-2-3 on the gearshift thing. I do know that the rpms at highway speed are quite a bit lower than my manual Subaru, which I forget whether it was four or five speeds but it certainly wasn’t three.

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