By on August 21, 2020

Keen to sweep as much attention away from the 2020 Democratic National Convention as possible, President Donald Trump campaigned in Old Forge, PA while Joe Biden accepted the Democratic nomination at a largely virtual event. You’ll be forgiven for not having watched either, as both amounted to little more than bashing the opposing side with nary a hint of actual policy. But Trump came the closest to offering something truly substantive, reiterating threats to companies to bring factory jobs back to the U.S. or suffer the consequences.

The president insisted that manufacturers would soon find themselves in a situation that benefits America whether they complied or not. “We will give tax credits to companies to bring jobs back to America, and if they don’t do it, we will put tariffs on those companies, and they will have to pay us a lot of money,” Trump said during the event.

Considering his trade policy history, the odds of this being an empty threat are slight. The U.S. enacted sweeping tariffs against China after the administration leveled accusations of rampant intellectual property theft and strong-arming corporations (especially automakers) into entering into joint ventures that required them to partner with Chinese entities and build within the Asian country’s borders in order to sell their wares.

Unfortunately, Trump also adhered to this week’s political theme of offering voters as little information as possible. No details were offered on the alleged credits program or how the tariffs would be utilized to discourage companies from offshoring jobs. But trade adviser Peter Navarro suggested to Bloomberg that the threats themselves could be enough to encourage the desired change.

“The beauty of the Trump tariffs is that they represent a powerful inducement for investment in domestic production by both American companies that have offshored our factories and foreign companies that want to sell into the U.S. market,” he told the outlet on Friday.

“We have seen this lesson time and again during this administration with the steel and aluminum tariffs, with the threat of auto tariffs, and with the China tariffs,” Navarro continued. “Tariffs mean more American jobs and factories.”

While we could have automatically assumed more tariffs (mainly against China) if Trump wins a second term, it’s nice to hear any politician give their two cents on an issue before an election. By contrast, the Biden campaign has been criticized for issuing conflicting information on how it would handle China if the former vice president is elected.

Most are under the assumption that the Democrats would attempt to improve relations with the PRC and rebuild trade  following a similar diplomatic approach as the Obama administration’s. But Biden’s rhetoric on China is far less empathetic now than it was when the Trump administration first took over. We should have a better understanding on the Dems’ trade policies as November nears, and are looking forward to seeing what it has in store for the automotive sector, specifically.

[Image: Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

131 Comments on “Trump Offers Credits for Companies That Bring Back American Factory Jobs, Tariffs for the Rest...”


  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I am all for ‘fair trade’ between nations that have similar standards of living and political freedoms. Oppose ‘free trade’ with dictatorships, 3rd world nations or nations that practice currency manipulation.

    Have even have paid more for many purchases over the past few years to purchase goods ‘made’ in North America or Europe. Unfortunately my ‘assembled in America’ washing machine is assembled from parts manufactured in Asia.

    However without a massive change in how the economy works, the companies do not pay for these tariffs. The consumer does. This has been demonstrated numerous times over the past few years. Plus the loss of jobs for those involved in distributing, selling, servicing, etc the foreign made products. And the lobbying from the multi-national corporations who are only interested in maximizing their profits.

    So a nice stump speech. Good intentions … but you know where they often lead.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      “However without a massive change in how the economy works, the companies do not pay for these tariffs. The consumer does.” Yep, that’s exactly how it is supposed to work. The consumer may perform a check on the difference in pricing for similar items manufactured on-shore and off-shore, make his own decision, and purchase as he pleases. If the higher price of tariff’d items pushes him away, the tariff indeed performed as designed. “Plus the loss of jobs for those involved in distributing, selling, servicing, etc the foreign made products.” – these folks should be aware of the issues of working with off-shore companies before hiring on. Due diligence and all that. I worked for dem deutschen volk for several years and knew their issues before joining them. All things (with the exception of death and taxes) are subject to change over time – whoops! Make that only death – we’re talking a form of taxation here.

      • 0 avatar
        Lynchenstein

        I remember the good ol’ days at TTAC when we could escape the messy partisan world of politics and could visit the messy partisan world of automotive brand loyalty. Sigh. Et tu, TTAC?

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          The messy partisan world of politics DRIVES the messy partisan world of automotive brands.

          And that started with the messy bail out and nationalization of GM in 2009.

          I remember the good ol’ days when gov’t stayed out of free enterprise. But these days any and all political actions can have unintended consequences on global business.

          And that started with the outsourcing of American jobs to overseas labor markets.

          • 0 avatar
            Peter Gazis

            HighDesertcat

            Didn’t you say you’re going to move to Mexico when Joe Biden wins? Good bye!
            We the true Americans are here to rebuild.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Peter Gazis, no need for us to move out of the US of A permanently in the unlikely event Biden should win. But we’ll travel.

            We just spent 13Mar-03Aug 2020 in Ensenada, Baja California, Old Mexico. And it was GRAND. And we have several other properties where we can stay stateside, owned by the family business or Resorts where we have business-memberships.

            We like to travel places. Maybe once there is a vaccine against the Wuhan virus we’ll resume travel.

            My oldest son moved to Japan to be with his Japanese wife, so he put his house up for sale, and we’re handling the sale. There’s a housing shortage at present and the demand for properties is ideal for sellers.

            We’ve got five nibbles right now, all from “back East”, all trying to outbid each other. And none of them have seen the property.

            Life is good. Why move out of the US? We’re totally insulated from an unlikely Biden win.

            It is only cheating by the ‘crats on a scale even worse than in 2016 with that “FBI Insurance Policy” that could rob Trump of a win by a landslide,

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            No one has messed more with “free enterprise” than the Orange Clown who threatens corporations to do his bidding.

            The outsourcing of American jobs to overseas markets was led by the big business Republicans, with Walmart leading the way in China.

            As for the “good ol’ days” of Pax Americana (the Eisenhower post-war yeats), that was when the govvt. heavily taxed businesses and the wealthy (the top marinal tax rate being over 90%) in order to pay down the immense WWII debt (remember when “fiscal conservatives” actually believed in paying down debt?) and to pay for large govt. social benefits under the GI Bill (reserved for white males), as well as huge infrastructure projects such as the Interstate Highway System.

            This led to the largest increase in the middle class the country has ever seen.

            But ever since “vodoo-economics”, er Reaganomics, the middle class has been shrinking.

            Also, all the bail outs (not just for GM) wouldn’t have been necessary if Wall St. and the big banks once again didn’t tank the economy after making immense fortunes from driving up speculation.

            That’s what happens when the govt, OVER-deregulates, just like the “Enron Loophole” (pushed by Republican Phil Gramm) which allowed Efron to manipulate energy markets, most notably, California’, which Gov. Davis ended up getting the blame for and being recalled.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          When was that? Back when they were reviewing Duesenbergs?

          • 0 avatar
            Daniel J

            @bd2,

            I’m Libertarian leaning, but “free enterprise” has never been free when it comes to trade with many countries. It’s like the socialists saying capitalism doesn’t work, when we have never had “real capitalism”. We’ve only had crony capitalism, just like we’ve always been on the wrong end of the trade deals.

            If it was free capitalism, then why does the EU have high tariffs on our cars? Why does China Steal our IP? Why do we have the chicken tax?

            It truly is a messy game. It’s not just “Orange Man” bad. If “Orange Man” bad, then so was Obama, Bush Jr, Clinton, and so forth. Government time and time again makes poor decisions.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        ” If the higher price of tariff’d items pushes him away, the tariff indeed performed as designed”

        I was just hit with a paying a 25% tariff on parts two days ago. My only cheaper alternatives were Chinese manufacturers with no support vs. the American manufacturer with Chinese manufacturing with stellar support 6 miles away from me. It was already costing me more before the tariff, but the support is worth it.

        Interestingly enough, I discovered Subaru is using almost the same exact parts from the same manufacturer in their next gen eyesight or whatever it’s called. They can import the parts to mexico tariff or somewhere else without the tariff, build the unit there, and ship the final part to the US to go into a car without paying the tariff. If I wanted to bypass the tariff, I could have done the same thing if I set up manufacturing in Mexico. It’s a one off prototype so it’s not worth doing it.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        “I am all for ‘fair trade’ between nations that have similar standards of living and political freedoms. Oppose ‘free trade’ with dictatorships, 3rd world nations or nations that practice currency manipulation.”

        100% agree. Open trade between a 1st world country and a 3rd world country is not “free trade.” it is a wealth transfer from one country to another, and from 1st world workers to the executives and shareholders.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          dwford – you nailed it. Real “comparative advantage” makes sense. Country “A” excels in aviation, company “B” excels in computers. These two countries take advantage of the others’ knowledge and each benefits from the trade between them. What we have with China is a race to the bottom. The fat cats get fatter while the “working” class works more and more and if they are lucky they tread water. More often than not, they lose ground.

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          Your comment is 100% wrong.

          The theory of comparative advantage was,first formally published in 1817, and we have been proving since at least 1846 that tariffs kill jobs and reduce prosperity.

          Free trade is open trade, and benefits all participants, Which is why trade liberalization has been a policy goal of all Western governments (until Trump) and a cornerstone of economic growth, since the end of WW2.

          Cuz Smoots-Hawley was such a brilliant success, wasn’t it?

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Free trade is open trade, and benefits all participants”

            So you believe the US should encourage and engage in commerce with any nation no matter how unsavory their actions may be? I suppose that is a worldview, but it isn’t one I’d support, even if it would be economically optimal.

          • 0 avatar
            dwford

            “Free trade is open trade, and benefits all participants”

            In the most macro sense, sure. But on the ground the reality is is that it is a wealth transfer from the middle class in the 1st world country to the poor in the 3rd world country. The people who really benefit are the upper middle class and wealthy in the 1st world country that get cheaper goods with no personal penalty. The lower middle class and poor in the 1st world country duo get cheaper good, but they have lost their good paying jobs and need the cheaper goods.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “…companies do not pay for these tariffs. The consumer does…”

      Yes and no. Mostly no. The marketplace usually sets the price. And if consumers pay more, it’s a small percentage of their income. How many large purchases are they forced annually anyway?

      I’m sure American consumers pay much more by having their friends and neighbors out of work.

      Make Americans Matter Again (MAMA).

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Yes, I would rather pay more and in return have more and better jobs locally. However multi national corporations profit from moving production to the lowest cost areas. If we just add tariffs, they continue to produce there and increase the price charged to consumers in the nation that has implemented the tariffs. The American market no longer drives global consumption or spending, so enacting tariffs alone will not convince multinationals to move their production. Complicating matters is that many corporations third-party/contract out much or all of their manufacturing.

        A concerted long-term plan requiring multiple like minded nations is required.

        Unfortunately the current president has demonstrated no capacity for long term planning, long term relationships, or the ability to work closely with the leaders of other democratic nations.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Well darn it @Arthur if I don’t get to return the favor…you nailed it here.

          Yes, I want to pay what it costs to bring something to market. That cost should include the cost of producing it in a manner where people aren’t being exploited. There was a time when we realized that communism was exploitive in nature. But we overlook it with respect to China now because they work for cheap.

          There was a time when cotton was cheaper as well because the people growing it didn’t have to pay the people harvesting it. The cheapest source doesn’t always equate to a free market.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yes consumers pay for everything. End of day, middle, every hour. A tariff is no different than any other company expense or tax. If the electric bill suddenly doubles, can you just raise the prices of goods and services to customers? Every time something comes up?

            Not always. Not in free market. At one time Australia charged 59% to import autos. Did Oz consumers pay that? Or did they mostly buy Oz domestically built (foreign makes)?

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        DenverMike, in our society, at the end of the day the consumer pays for everything. There is no Santa Claus. Tariffs raise prices, which are paid by consumers. Ditto business taxes. Ditto social policies, regulations, whatever.

        One may support or oppose specific measures, but at the end of the day all costs are borne by individuals. The only question is how those costs are apportioned.

        • 0 avatar
          SoCalMikester

          we are at a weird place now where the consumer doesnt pay for everything, all the time, directly.

          teslas are subsidized and still lose money. all the amazon free delivery and freebies are subsidized. all the fruits of the gig economy are subsidized.

          if something seems too good to be true, it still is. Santa Claus is AWS and vulture capitalist money

  • avatar
    hreardon

    I’m getting quotes to replace my 50 year old boiler. All three companies have told me that had I done this three years ago, the cost would be about 30% less than it is this time around. Reason: tariffs impacting the cost of steel and components used in the subcomponents.

    While I’d love to save the 30%, I’m all for sticking it to China. Yes, it’s a bit of cutting of my nose, but I think it’s something that needs to happen and I’m willing to accept it.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Bring Back American Factory Jobs”

    So I can call for a Boycott and put your employees out on the street, I’m looking at you, Goodyear

    Who does this joker think he’s kidding?

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      As was pointed out, Goodyear closed at least one US plant last year (Gadsden, AL) and moved it to Mexico so it isn’t like they are being driven out by election year rhetoric and as Alabama supports numerous profitable manufacturers (Hyundai, Honda, Toyota and Mercedes Benz to name a few it sure seems like they were chasing the dollar

      And for the record, first time in the rain in my Challenger today. I’ll be going back to Bridgestone’s or Michelin’s as soon as I can vaporize these Eagle RS-A II’s. Not impressed for an all season. I’ve done better on summer only tires. But then again, you kind of know this with Goodyear’s…I’d have never gotten them on their merits, they came with the car.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        You may have missed my point, the President on one hand is asking to bring back jobs to America, but then threatens American jobs by calling for a boycott, because his feelings got hurt

        He repeatedly tries to play both ends against the middle causing confusion and mistrust

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          President want to force losers in management out and replace them with some real people

        • 0 avatar
          Daniel J

          Lie2me,

          Its not just his feelings. Its the double standard of the left. They can boycott and cancel whom they choose with the weight and power of the media. But alas, conservatives aren’t allowed to?

          I find it hilarious when the left says they don’t have cancel culture, then calls out Trump for being a hypocrite. Trump can’t be a hypocrite if the left doesn’t truly have cancel culture, which of course, we all know they do.

          Lets even get more to the point however, I think these two things are mutually exclusive and fairly nuanced. But I guess no one understands that individuals can feel one way about one company because of their specific actions, and feel another way on the larger scale of bringing jobs back.

          • 0 avatar
            randyinrocklin

            @daniel, It’s no sense in reasoning with fools like lie and dailey.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            randyinrocklin, They’re trolls. Good old trolls.

            No matter what the facts someone presents, they will always take a trolling stance against it or fornicate it out of shape until it is unrecognizable.

            If you want tangible and solid discussions, visit the various money boards where everyone’s got skin in the game. Yeah, they discuss cars there too.

            It’s a world where money talks, and bullschit walks.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            If someone posts an opinion that differs from yours, they are fools or trolls.

            Got it.

            That’s the quickest and easiest way out.

            It takes hard and honest work to evaluate one’s position and that of another. The “hard” part is to be “honest” about one’s own opinions and where they come from!

    • 0 avatar

      It is a shame that American companies support rioters who destroy our cities. People who abandon cities are not coming back.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        The B&B do realize that Bridgestone, Michelin and Pirelli are not American companies, don’t they?

        As for rioting and violence. Since 2002 the vast majority of domestic terrorist attacks and bombings have been committed by members of the far right. Not the left.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Yep. They are simply better tires…well Bridgestone and Michelin anyway.

          Incidentally the last pair of tires I bought were Coopers for the truck. Not outstanding but they ride and wear well which is fine for a pick up. They are US made and reasonably priced.

          But with respect to performance tires you kind of have to look at non US stuff sadly.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Art Vandelay
            I did not like the stock GoodYear Wrangler SR-A’s on my truck. They were sh!t. Poor wear and flat resistance. I’ve gotten great life out of the Wrangler Duratrac’s. I might try a set of Cooper tires next.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          This, the far right is much more dangerous.

          Tennessee’s Republican governor just signed a bill making it a felony if convicted for protesting.

          This is on top of Republicans (esp. Trumputin) trying their darndest to make sure that voting by mail in ballots becomes harder, among other things to take away the vote.

          Why aren’t these right-wing militias up in arms over the anti-democracy movement by Republicans to suppress the right to vote (but yet, they have a total cow when asked to wear a mask for public safety/health)?

          What’s simply hilarious is that one state has sent requests for a mail in ballot with an image of the wannabe tin pot orange despot, proclaiming that it is the Dems who want to take away their rights. Lol

          • 0 avatar
            Daniel J

            bd2,

            You can still walk in and vote. Jesus. No one is taking that away.

            I just read the bill you speak of in TN, and specifically says camping on state property.

            “The state defines unauthorized camping as setting up a temporary structure, i.e. a tent, tarp or piece of furniture between 10 p.m.-7 a.m. in a non-designated camping area. People found sleeping, storing personal items, cooking, lighting a fire, and “digging or earth breaking” are in violation of the new law”

            So, come back the next day.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Not to mention that America was born of a Revolution. That included killing, burning, destroying, and yes, ripping down British statues. Over the centuries America has had uprisings – it is what drives the social ratchet forward. Funny, during the Vietnam war, protesters were beaten by dumbasses building the World Trade Center and Tricky “Law and Order” Dick was cool with it. So much for Law and Order…usual authoritarian horsecrap.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            There isn’t going to be a revolution. Revolutions are uncomfortable, bloody wars. When you are breaking glass and burning buildings, you are rioting. A Revolution would be when you start trying to break the glass and burn the buildings in areas where people are willing to fight back, and it will be short lived in such areas and bloody.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “Bring Back American Factory Jobs”

      The only way to do that is to kill AI and robotics. The predictions on job losses over the next 20 years due to those 2 factors are staggering and they have nothing to do with China or any other foreign country.

      Tariffs are paid by the people buying the product which is usually the middle class. Tax breaks are paid by the middle class since virtually everyone else doesn’t.

  • avatar
    redapple

    The Twitter.
    The braggadocio
    The inflated claims.

    Yeah – it s a bit much. But I look at him like one of my engineering employees. His form is not polished. I look at results – job performance.

    Record good economy before the China Plague.
    Re built military
    Isis treaty.
    Attempted N Korea decrease in hostility.
    Tax cuts
    Energy Independence
    Bucked up NATO – pay your way guys, why are we on the hook for your defense?
    Put Israel up on our relationship level.
    Got out of Iran deal. #1 sponsor of world terror. Put these crazies on the raod to LEGAL nukes.
    Re balanced the trade with Mexico and China
    He is harder on Russia than Obama was.

    I could go on.

    He s like an employee who s form is not good – but is a stellar performer. Outstanding deliverables. Every smart Manager KEEPS people like these.

    Deal with FACTS. Not emotion.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      ” look at results – job performance.”

      Yup, this guy has had an impressive first term of accomplishments.

      The swamp creatures are squirming and spasmming at what Trump has achieved in less than four years on the job.

      He’s got the ‘crats involuntarily retching and hurling. Most effective President of my lifetime, even better than Reagan.

      He helped a lot of Joe Sixpacks and Sally Homemakers with his policies. Hell, he helped me and mine bigly.

      But as we all know, all good things will come to an end. If not in Jan 2021, then certainly after the next “FOUR MORE YEARS.”

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        You sure live in an alternative reality.

        The US hasn’t seen this low point in decades and the swamp has only filled, led by the Grifter-in-chief himself.

        How many Drumpf associates, including those who have worked in his administration or campaign, have been indicated now?

        Not to mention LONG list of Republicans who have worked in national security, including some in the Drumpf admin, who state that Drumpf is a threat to national security.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      @ redapple,

      “He is harder on Russia than Obama was.”

      You just killed your whole argument :(

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Meh, he’ll have more flexibility after the election, or so I’ve heard.

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        LIE

        Well, you must not have studied the russian matter much, no avail.
        So, my listed facts and others i can list Evaporate suddenly and you win. He s bad.

        So, clear judgement has left you and orange man bad.

        I agree. You are right. Biden (for 3 months then Harris takes over) is great. Biden great. Lie – you are so wise.

        ORANGE MAN BAD.

        DEADWeight I understand now.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          You sir have not read the bipartisan Senate Intelligence Committee reports released by congress on Russian collusion and you won’t either, because your mind is already made up

          If anyone else is interested

          https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/18/us/politics/senate-intelligence-russian-interference-report.html?auth=login-facebook

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      The economy only followed the trajectory set by the previous administration. Only the upward graph of the previous administration was actually better.

      Has set record national debt levels. Thus borrowing now to try to gain votes and holding future generations hostage to massive debts.

      Got publicly pantsed by North Korea. Gave their regime recognition and received nothing in return.

      Isis was destroyed primarily by Kurdish troops. Who the USA then abandoned. Only this time there were no last minute helicopters leaving the roof of the US embassy.

      Tax cuts for the rich. Increasing wealth disparity.

      Alienated most nations in NATO. Thus strengthening the Russian threat in Eastern Europe.

      The #1 sponsor and financier of world terror is Saudi Arabia. Check the list of 9-11 terrorists. Research where Wahhabist thought comes from.

      Had to bail out American farmers with billions of dollars due to the botched tariff plan in China. Has not ‘balanced’ trade with China or reduced Chinese holding of American debt, but cut a deal for his daughter’s brands.

      Plays nice with Putin, tried to get Russia re-instated into the G8, has not made protest about Russian bounties on American soldiers, held back assistance to Ukraine while it is being attacked by Russian backed insurgents. Has allowed Putin to become the world’s richest man, and Russia to gain a foothold in the Middle East.

      So in reality at best a D performer based just on these. Add in the total disarray among staff, with a constant turnover, and the admission that he makes things up (after speaking with the Canadian PM), constant mistruths/mistatements, total mishandling of the COVID situation, and the loss of American prestige worldwide and you have a ‘failed’president.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Redapple/HighDesertcat

      • Piled on the Debt in a time of piece and prosperity.
      • Abandoned our Allies on the battlefield (see Syria)
      • Supported and retweeted racist propaganda
      • Took young children away from families

      AND REFUSES TO WEAR A MASK DURING A PANDEMIC!

      If you guys like Trump so much, you should listen to his advice and shove a blue light up your @$$.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Trump’s going to win by a landslide this time. It was Divine Intervention that put him into office in 2016.

        That’s why there is all the effort on the part of the ‘crats to cheat their way to a win in 2020.

        The ‘crats cheated in 2016 and it backfired on them, and people are going to the Big House now.

        Allahu Akbar!

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      He was handed a strong economy. He has besmirched our standing throughout the world. His criminal enterprise is slowly crashing down around him. Many of the people he’s hired, “nothing but the best”, are grifters. The handful of competent folks that put their foot in his pond soon fled. Perhaps they’ve helped you, but the tax cuts did nothing for me.

      I’m more of a Jeb Bush/Dennis Kasich kind of guy, but I completely lost interest in Trump when he disrespected McCain and then a Gold Star family. He has no moral compass, no constraints, no control. To me the president must strive to set a moral example. The name calling, pathological lies and slander at his age indicate something is seriously misfired. My heart is heavy for Melania and Barron.

      Covid45 has claimed 6 people I knew. All he had to do was care enough to pretend it was serious and let the experts make the plays. This is on him alone.

    • 0 avatar
      KingShango

      This is a joke right?

      Record good economy before the China Plague – aka inherited an economic boom
      Re built military – What? The military has had near historic levels of funding since we invaded Afghanistan, the idea that they’re hurting or underfunded is just ridiculous.
      Isis treaty – Sure I guess, I’m sure there won’t be any more problems in the Middle East.
      Attempted N Korea decrease in hostility – Negotiating with N Korea is good, they still have nukes btw, but negotiating with Iran is bad?
      Tax cuts – Chis Christie or Marco Rubio would’ve got the same cuts with a lot less drama.
      Energy Independence – Same as the economy, was already happening.
      Bucked up NATO – pay your way guys, why are we on the hook for your defense? – If NATO starts “paying their own way” why do we need to “rebuild” our military? This is a way overly simplistic view of geopolitics
      Put Israel up on our relationship level. – I agree with you on this one
      Got out of Iran deal. #1 sponsor of world terror. Put these crazies on the raod to LEGAL nukes. – See N Korea above. The Iran deal was a first step not the end of the road.
      Re balanced the trade with Mexico and China – The new NAFTA is a reskinned old NAFTA, hardly a dramatic victory.
      He is harder on Russia than Obama was.- How exactly?

      Any other republican candidate in 2016 would’ve gotten the same results or probably better.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The moment is see something like “Isis treaty” and the end statement says “Deal with FACTS. Not emotion.”, it’s blatantly obvious that we have someone that isn’t dealing with the actual true real world “facts”. FAUXED news aren’t facts.

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    I like the idea of bringing jobs back to America, especially those that were outsourced by the previous administrations.

    But there was so much outsourced, especially to China, that no amount of Trump incentives can bring them all back within the next four-year term when President Trump gets re-elected.

    So I’m with Arthur Dailey on this, “Good intentions … but you know where they often lead.” I support the effort but believe it when I see it.

    In the mean time, the like-minded can always choose to #BOYCOTTCHINA.

    I do, where I can.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      The company where I work markets small simple single-use (disposable) electronic instruments. Our company founder was a WWII vet, and worked VERY hard, over many years, to find/develop a domestic manufacturing partner for our products. His efforts were entirely fruitless.

      We learned that USA is entirely unable to manufacture simple electornic components like resistors, capactitors, and diodes. The US factories that once did that production disappeared in the 1970s. We also learned that when we order a new die mold for the plastic case of our device, in USA it would take months to have such a thing produced. Our supplier in China usually has such a thing in three weeks.

      When we found a domestic electronic assembly house, which would order components from China for assembly in its soutwest US facility, we learned A) costs for finished products were higher than what we could SELL them for, and B) most of the assemblers were illegal immigrants (sorry, “foreign nationals” for those who seek political correctness) from south of the US-Mexico border…which mostly defeats the purpose — employing Americans!

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        R Henry, regrettably there are so many similar stories out in the market place. One of them was Muntz TV, the founder was a friend of my dad’s in SoCal.

        I try to set all that aside and focus on buying what is made in America, by Americans, for Americans, whenever I have the chance.

        One of the most influential things we can do is to look at where a product is made, if we have that opportunity.

        I recently started taking 2 pills because of age-related problems, and one is made in India, the other is made in Germany. My wife is taking another pill that is made in Israel. In each case, these are the sole-source countries of origin for these meds.

        I don’t think Trump has enough time to change all that, even if he’s in office for four more years.

        But I hope some companies will take him up on his offer. Then again, once the ‘crats come into power, everything will be outsourced again and American jobs lost.

        They did it once before, they’ll do it again. For sure!

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          highdesertcat, the fact is that American manufacturing is alive and growing – and has been for many years. But it’s evolving.

          Bureau of Economic Analysis data tells us that US manufacturing output has doubled since NAFTA was signed – and that’s in constant dollars, so inflation removed.

          During the same period, Bureau of Labor Statistics data tells us that direct manufacturing employment has fallen by 1/3.

          So, manufacturing output has steadily grown while manufacturing employment has steadily fallen. This is all about automation, and the trend in US manufacturing to higher-value, higher-technology products. Which we sell to the same countries from which we import lower-value products. And everybody wins from that.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @ect: Yes, US manufacturing is definitely growing. One growing sector is additive manufacturing. It’s a huge threat to China’s manufacturing sector. It’s not just plastic. They’re now doing metal printing as well. Porsche even printed pistons. Of course, it’s highly automated and instead of a machinist, you have a robot doing the work.

            I’ve been printing a lot of parts that normally would have been made in china. Plastic cases for devices. My daughter has even been requesting household items. She’ll find the design online, email it to me, I’ll do some preprocessing, then ship it to a printer. It then takes away work from someone in China. Of course, since it’s automated, there is no US worker involved either.

            Rather than penalizing American consumers and small businesses with tariffs, the government should be directly targeting foreign products by developing and encouraging technologies that make US manufacturing more economical and convenient than offshore. Additive manufacturing can be a major part of that effort. More research and education is needed to make it more widespread. Tariffs are a passive response. Improving manufacturing technology is a proactive and much more effective approach.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The out-sourcing of jobs was led by Republicans, and Walmart (a huge donor to Republicans) led the way in China.

      And the orange clown is all bluster and doesn’t walk the talk.

      The Drumpf hotel/condo built in Chicago and Vegas were built with Chinese steel and aluminum.

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    Trump record the 1st 3 years:
    • $3 trillion added to National Debt.
    • 250,000 manufacturing jobs lost
    Translation: Trump threw a party on the National Credit Card, and we have nothing to show for it.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      My list is a bit longer, but yours is good

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        I agree that list has some good points. So how do you see the Democrats turning all of that around? Assuming the polls hold and Biden wins. And does that 250,000 figure you cite include some jobs lost to covid-19?

        • 0 avatar

          Democrats will not turn all that around. They are hell bend to turn everything upside down. It is the revolution baby!

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            Well, they keep talking like they will. And that is actually appealing to me. But I am a little concerned and want some details because Obama did not create manufacturing jobs. We lost 300,000 during his term and there wasn’t even a pandemic.

            https://www.factcheck.org/2016/12/obamas-record-on-manufacturing-jobs/

            But I’m not saying they haven’t learned or do not have a plan now. So I would like to hear it. I’m not trying to be a smarty pants, I’m just honestly trying to get information.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            Inside Looking Out,

            Oh, the dems would turn things around and around and around. By the time they got done the average person in this country wouldn’t know which end to sh!t out of. The scary part about it is that it is so obvious what they will do if they get in, but people can’t see it. They should know that all the riots and the noise that went with the riots is a perfect, and obvious, foretaste of what will happen if the dems get control. The same corporations that funded the lovely rioters and stopped the governments of cities from containing the rioters are backing and controlling the “democratic” party.

          • 0 avatar

            “did not create manufacturing jobs”

            Don’t worry they will create lot of manufacturing jobs in labor camps. Who you think made vast amount of V1 rockets and T-34 tanks during WW2? Not Chinese workers.

          • 0 avatar
            Imagefont

            Fact: Obama handed Trump a thriving economy. Trump deserves NO credit for Obama’s good work.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          Since at this moment it appears he’s going to win, or at least there’s a very high probability, I would really like to hear what the plan is versus trying to turn this into a typical name-calling political thing. Thanks guys.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    So the guy screaming be afraid of fascist socialists is promising socialism…

    Take all the time you need to unpack that.

    Tariffs are price controls.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      How without tariffs will the incoming Democratic administration correct the negative aspects of China’s trade policies do you think?

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        That was the major point of the TPP, to form a trade bloc that could pressure China.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          China is not a party to the TPP. There were no provisions in it designed to pressure China. Plus, Hillary Clinton came out against it in 2016 anyway, as did the major labor unions.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Superdessucke – TPP was designed to funnel billions away from the Chinese and into American hands and those of its allies. If you limit trade with an adversary and boost trade with other countries in the region, that in fact pressures the adversary.
            Hillary changed her mind because she wanted to look like she was supporting unions. That ploy didn’t work.
            TPP wasn’t designed to help American workers directly. The theory was to drain money going to China and put it into the USA which would spur industrial growth in the USA.
            It was meant to be a first step in a long term Pacific rim plan.

            An interesting part of that TPP deal was that Canada was going to give some concessions to the USA. Trump was bragging about getting benefits for the USA out of Canada with USMCA but all of those concessions were part of TPP. Canada did not give up anything new.

  • avatar
    ajla

    China is worse than Trump and will remain a problem long after he’s back to judging Miss Universe and selling things on QVC.

    I’d like the US government to take aggressive economic action against the mainland, even if that leads to price level increases in the US.

    A deal with the devil is still dealing with the devil.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      China’s long-term economic philosophy is “Global Dominance” and “Military Superiority” over this planet.

      You also need to know why that philosophy exists since the end of WWII.

      There’s plenty of reading material out there if you’re interested, especially in the recommended reading materials of the National War College and The Air War College, and other think-tank organizations (of which there are a ton!)

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Agreed. I’m all for free trade but China hasn’t engaged fairly, and they have other intentions that are less than filling the world with the goodness of cheap goods. If Biden wins, and the polls indicate he will, then I expect he will be tough on China also. The other posters are saying he’ll do it smarter. They haven’t explained how but I don’t care how, just do it.

  • avatar

    Stop the Invasion, Boycott Envasion

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    I also try to purchase “Made in the USA”, but there are many instances where this is no longer possible, at any price.

    Beyond the partisan finger pointing, there is a third party which, in my opinion, is responsible for the most damage: corporate America.

    Those are the ones who sold America’s soul to the devil, in the chase for ever growing profits.
    And payback time is approaching.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      How do you see the payback coming? How will it manifest itself?

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      schmitt trigger,

      You could say corporate America is the culprit. But, they mostly just tried to maximize profits by minimizing cost. Which is just good business in a free market economy. Unfortunately that led to major offshoring.

      Trump’s tariff idea limits how “free” that free market is. It’s hard to deny that. But, at the same time, if something like it isn’t done then the US economy will continue to take a nose dive. An economy built on manufacturing and tangible goods is (I think, correct me it I’m wrong) far more solid than one with its manufacturing base offshore.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        It’s not just the economy. Countries which cannot make things are weak and vulnerable, as we just learned the hard way during the COVID pandemic. We couldn’t even make our own masks and ventilators at the outset.

  • avatar

    What actually is happening – the Global order as we knew it is crashing down. World is on the verge of radical change. Globalism which was the result of WW1 and WW2 and Pax Americana is coming to the end. In every country nationalist leaders are taking power. It will happen in Germany too – just watch Euro TV. Large companies are interested in Globalism and therefore they are against Trump. Rioters are nothing but paid actors to help to remove Trump. Why Trump? Because he is a disruptor. He will do all necessary changes fast and will save us time and misery. If Democrats take power they will resist necessary changes but result will be the same only we will arrive there hard way with lot of misery and lost lives. And remember – hard way means there will be draft in US army. Just professional army will not cut it.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Inside Looking Out,

      I’m afraid that if the dems get the power they will do more and more to force their idiot ideology down our throats. Free speech? Forget it — it will be offensive. Revisionism. Counter revolutionary. Or whatever they decide to call it.

      Of course, it goes without saying that all these activists and rioters haven’t the slightest clue about what they are being used for. They don’t even seem to know that they are being used. A lot of the same stuff happened before the 2016 election. Funny how every four years there is a great resurgence of racism in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      Imagefont

      “Rioters are nothing but paid actors to remove Trump”
      Yeah, you caught me, I was being paid to riot. The money came from the Deep State Fund, financed by a giant child prostitution ring in pizza parlors all over the country. But I went on strike because I wanted a raise! So I protested!
      You may need to adjust your tin foil hat.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        You joke, but look at what our President just Tweeted…

        Donald J. Trump
        @realDonaldTrump
        The deep state, or whoever, over at the FDA is making it very difficult for drug companies to get people in order to test the vaccines and therapeutics. Obviously, they are hoping to delay the answer until after November 3rd. Must focus on speed, and saving lives! @SteveFDA
        6:49 AM · Aug 22, 2020·Twitter for iPhone

        The FDA is now part of the “Deep State” Hahahaha!

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          Lie2me/Imagefont,

          You guys are so right. It’s a well known fact that the rich and powerful have never conspired behind closed doors. Corruption in ‘Merica? Never happen (except if it’s a republican, lmao).

          You’re all so ready to yell at people who don’t wear a (useless) mask. You would say they are putting everyone else’s lives at risk; so they need to “grow up.”

          But, the truth is that your addiction to the comforting lies the media feeds you is putting other people’s lives at risk. So you need to wake up.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Nah, I just get my kicks by reading the BS Trump tweets every few minutes. If you want a good laugh just go to his Twitter feed and read them for yourself

            He has become completely unhinged

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Yeah @image, imagine what kind of conspiracy nut one has to be to think a bunch of elites are involved in pedophilia. Oh wait…

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Don’t forget the cannibalism as well

          Hahaha!

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            The irony of it is that it looks like all the dem sponsored hijinks this year has ended up turning off a lot of people. A lot of people who say they have been lifelong dems are now saying that all the chaos has changed their minds, and now they are going to vote for Trump.

        • 0 avatar
          Imagefont

          I believe one of President Trumps pedophile friends just killed himself in jail recently so you may have a point.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I don’t agree with rioting and looting, but I was privileged to have been part of the protests in May. The Women’s March in 2017 was spectacular as well. Peaceable assembly is a linchpin of our democracy.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      @Inside looking out:
      “Rioters are nothing but paid actors to help to remove Trump.”

      I have about 50 friends who have been protesting for free!

      They’d love go get paid for it. It’d be a great second job for most of them, and it’s something they’re going to do anyway, so why not get paid for it?

      Can you point me to a job posting or direct me who to call? We could all use a side hustle, and they’ll be out protesting either way.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Protesting isn’t the problem. Or the job. Rioters/looters can be a totally different set of actors. And could be the cops themselves.

        If a government has decided to go to war, something has to spark it. Offen that spark needs to be helped along.

        It’s just curious that riot police were way more interested in busting the peaceful protesters than the rioters/looters.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @DenverMike – “It’s just curious that riot police were way more interested in busting the peaceful protesters than the rioters/looters.”

          It’s safer to shoot a guy in the back or kneel on a guys neck than go after a mob of criminals busting sh!t up.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Prediction: We have seen our last two-term president for awhile (this prediction relates to 2020 and to 2024).

    Prediction (this one is shakier): Biden will be the last non-celebrity president we see for several terms (exception granted for vice presidents who become president).

    [As usual, I will be voting third party, not that my vote will count for much directly, since I don’t live in a swing state.]

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    The stock market appears to think Trump will win re-election. No way it would be setting records if Biden was favored to win.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      … or not

      “The stock market would love a Democratic sweep in November”

      https://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-stock-market-would-love-a-democratic-sweep-in-november-2020-08-14?mod=article_inline

      Doesn’t matter, most people are more interested in their health and their jobs then they are in the stock market

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Exactly. Way too many people have their heads buried in Fox and OAN and quite frankly both are considered infotainment. But to each their own.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          Dave M,

          “both are considered infotainment.”

          And, of course CNN and the NYT (which used to be a good newspaper) are straight up.

          Let’s face it all these rags slant things. Fox towards the right and CNN towards the left (which is where most of the media is). Getting any kind of picture of what is going on takes a lot of reading and not just from tabloids like CNN, NYT, Fox, etc. The journalistic integrity of the main stream media is generally poor.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Old_WRX, I don’t know what happened to you, but for a lifelong engineer you have lost all your critical thinking skills. Were you a good engineer?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        That link (which is an opinion piece not any type of statistical analysis) isn’t exactly a glowing recommendation of Democrat party policies. It literally calls them “a party of drunkards”. Its position is that higher taxes will hurt corporate earnings but will be offset by higher government spending and easier credit standards to make capital expenditure cheaper.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      “The stock market appears to think Trump will win re-election. No way it would be setting records if Biden was favored to win.”

      Biden is currently favored to win in all the betting markets. And the stock market may react positively to a Biden/Harris presidency given that the likely outcome of that will be increased focus on globalization and “free trade” (as that term was defined during the Obama years and before). So that would be good for corporate profits and thus the stock market.

      Stock market doesn’t necessarily track the interests of the working class in the U.S. or even the overall health of the U.S. economy, though that helps, and it has over the last three years. But Obama’s presidency was very good for the top tier of our society and corporate profits.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Lie2me,

      “Old_WRX, I don’t know what happened to you, but for a lifelong engineer you have lost all your critical thinking skills.”

      No. And, yes I was a good engineer. At least the people where worked sure seemed to think so. But, I mostly saw was what could be improved on — which is probably one of the reasons I was good. I was never content to keep doing things the same old way. Always pushing the envelop on quality and quantity of my work.

      If my approach to engineering had been like the average American’s way of keeping informed, I wouldn’t have been nearly as effective. I listened to what people had to say, but I never assumed that was the last word. All hypotheses are provisional and always subject to change if new information should come to light. All work is work in progress. If you think you really understand what is going on in the world, then chances you are wrong and have slipped into the comfort of seeking confirmation rather than information.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Ok, but you sound more and more like FOX News and less like whatever other news source are telling you. My lifelong engineering experience taught me to gather as much info as possible and when you’re pretty sure you have what you need to make recommendations, go check it all again

        Then after checking it all again go to the history and see what has worked and not worked in the past and who was responsible for the successes and failures

        Only then can you make informed conclusions, but still lay awake hoping you didn’t miss something

        “Dem sponsored hi-jinks and Dem chaos” is right out of Fox and Friends. The chaos, disarray and mismanagement comes from incompetent leadership at the top

        ……………………………….

        “Donald J. Trump
        @realDonaldTrump

        Leadership: Whatever happens, you’re responsible. If it doesn’t happen, you’re responsible.

        1:01 PM · Nov 8, 2013·Twitter Web Client”

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          Lie2me,

          OK, if believing that CNN and NYT are handed down straight from god helps you to sleep at night, I guess that’s what you are going to do.

          I should mention that I’ve always been a democrat. And, I still believe in some of the things the dems claim to believe. The problem is that the dems are now owned by the corporations. Oh, but that’s right, it doesn’t say that on CNN or the NYT (couldn’t have anything to do with who owns them, nah). The information about who owns what “news” sources is readily available.

          Several years ago I read the “The Conscience of a Conservative” by Barry Goldwater and learned that a lot of it made sense to me. It would be nice if the dems and reps practiced what they preach. The point at this time is NOT that the Donald is any prize; he’s not. The point right now is that there is a particularly dangerous threat from the democratic side.

          But, if you don’t mind living in a country without police (I believe that as of yesterday, Portland Oregon had enjoyed 68 straight nights of riots — city is run by dems) and don’t mind carefully monitoring your speech for anything that anyone might allege is offensive, then by all means vote for the dems. And, they will make sure that we all get to enjoy living like the people of Portland are — terrorized by the mob.

          But, to save you the trouble of responding, I’m sure that what I have just said disagrees with what it is says in [your favorite “news” source]…

          So, have a nice day. But, I do strongly recommend that you start looking at other sources than just the MSM. No competent engineer would only listen to what management said — if he/she did then when they flipped the switch the wheel wouldn’t go round. The MSM is like management — their heads are more than just a bit lost in the politics. You need to go down to the machine shop and push it around with machinists, out to the production floor and talk with the people there, to your internal customer and hash it over to find out what they really want (often not you’ve been told they want). If you just go along with all the talking heads, the gizmo won’t fill the bill. Then you get dirt on your face — even if you did just what they asked you to do. Use you brain. You didn’t make a lifelong career in engineering by getting info blindly, did you?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    “China’s long-term economic philosophy is “Global Dominance” and “Military Superiority” over this planet.”

    You hit the nail on the head. Despite who is in office and our trade policies we have become more and more dependent on China. China’s intentions toward the US and our allies are not good. China is on the road to become the Number 1 Economic Global power and I fear China might eventually become the Number 1 Global Military Power.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      What I like about President Trump’s dealing with China, NATO, and other nations is his rude, crude, socially unacceptable direct approach. Like many other American citizens, I believe that America has been abused by other nations way too long. I especially like Trump’s de-coupling from China, and repairing the damage the last administration has done to America.

      The question has thus become, “Will election cheating by the ‘crats in 2020 be enough to deny Trump a second term?”

      It wasn’t in 2016, in spite of the FBI Insurance Policy.

      I think it will be a similar election to Bush v Gore.

      But if Trump wins a second term, that will be good news all around for the auto industry, and everything else.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        “…The question has thus become, “Will election cheating by the ‘crats in 2020 be enough to deny Trump a second term?…”

        Well, let’s see.

        1. Republicans have pushed Kanye West onto the ballot in some swing states. A local news station recorded a female lawyer for the GOP rushing in with a stack of signature sheets(*Lane Ruhland, who represented the Trump campaign in court last week, was seen on Tuesday dropping off ballot signatures in Wisconsin on West’s behalf.). Why? Obviously to try to siphon black votes from Sleepy Joe.

        2. Covid testing has slowed from about 800K/month to 700K a month…Why? So the White House can cook the books on the status of the pandemic and show improving numbers. Easy with all data being routed to the WH first…even if you don’t believe they are cooking anything, the optics are horrifically bad.

        3. Putting a crony with zero postal experience in charge of the USPS to slow down the mails. Were some of those sorter machines that were being removed slated for removal before? Yes. But not all of them. Plus the removing of collection boxes, and the slowing down of the delivery. I’m sure you will say all the images leaking out are made up by union malingerers with an ax to grind over lost OT. So, we did a test with some mail to a friend’s house. Result was unfortunately inconclusive. One item took six days to get there. The other, mailed a week later, arrived in 3.

        4. Threats to put the military and “troopers” at polling places – one of the oldest voter suppression mechanism known to authoritarians and very much a part of America’s past.

        These are the top four that popped into my mind. I’m sure you will dismiss them all. However, something to think about – both sides of the aisle are highly suspicious about the validity of our election process. Being that voting is a fundamental part of our democracy, such a loss of faith in our voting system is highly damaging to our country’s stability, no matter what you political position might be.

        I can’t share your optimism for the current administration. The guardrails of our democracy have been badly battered and compromised by Trump. Another 4 years will firmly cement our country’s drift toward authoritarianism.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          “Covid testing has slowed from about 800K/month to 700K a month…Why?”

          My small Midwestern small college town is now accounts for about 1% of the COVID tests nationally.

          Why? Because we decided to use the expertise of our scientists to reopen our University properly.

          We’re about 6 months behind the curve here, but we’re way ahead of the rest of the USA and we’re sciencing the sh*t out of this problem.

          Hopefully it’ll work.

        • 0 avatar
          Daniel J

          ” The guardrails of our democracy have been badly battered and compromised by Trump. Another 4 years will firmly cement our country’s drift toward authoritarianism.”

          Really? And Obama said he fix it with his pen. and folks who say the same thing wanted Trump to roll in the national guard and shut the country down which he has no legal authority to do so.

          If anything over the last few months we’ve realized how much autonomy the states and local governments do have.

  • avatar
    lwest

    This article is lacking Truth and Cars.WTF

  • avatar
    Freddie

    The argument against tariffs in one word: Pinto. Ok, another word: Vega.

    I think most TTAC readers with a sense of history know that the Detroit Three and the UAW had nothing but arrogant contempt for car buyers – until Toyota, Honda, etc. posed an existential threat.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Toyonda are part of US auto industry. They hire here in America

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      The domestic auto makers did do a very impressive job of avoiding making a decent small car. Year after year, model after model. Vega, Pinto, Gremlin, (s)Pacer, Chevette. An absolutely stultifying parade of misguided junk.

      I still remember all the fuss about how the Chevette was going to be something great. At the time I was working for a Chevy dealer (in the grand position of used car lot boy) so I heard the hype day after day, and, stupidly got sort of sucked into it. Then I got a chance to drive the great new Chevette! What a piece of poop. It felt like all the mechanicals were made out of cheap plastic. And drove like something twenty years out of date.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Fears that Biden as president would end free speech and institute ‘socialism’ ignore the fact that no Democratic president has tried any of that. Even Obama with Biden as his VP. Biden is an old school politician who will actually try to work with Republican politicians.

    The current president has however threatened American democratic principles. Has mused about placing troops/police at polling stations, emulating every tin pot dictator of the past century. He has questioned the legitimacy of the American judiciary, a branch of the government which requires separation from the executive. He has attacked the free press, an outlet which is necessary for a democracy. He has made various unsupported claims questioning the American voting process, thus challenging the foundation of American democracy.

    All of these claims mirror the propaganda spouted by the Soviet Union to discredit American democracy.

    And he created national government debt at a record rate, during a boom economy. The exact opposite of what economists recommend.

    I agree that Biden is a weak candidate and if elected probably will not complete his term. However Biden is not a direct threat to American democracy. The incumbent is.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “The current president has however threatened American democratic principles.”

      I can cite multiple examples of presidents from the past doing the same things you listed. And the country is still here. And some of those presidents are on money and mountains.

      Whether Trump or Biden wins this year I’ll feel no larger degree of relief or dread. I don’t think Trump is a good leader and I’m not going to vote for him, but I think the talk about how he is some sort of unique existential threat to the country or the world is overstated, the same way that talk about how Biden is some puppet to the Weather Underground commie pedophile cabal is overstated. At most Trump is a symptom of issues, not the cause, and they aren’t going to disappear just because he does.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Arthur Dailey

      “And he created national government debt at a record rate”

      I believe the great money grab under the guise of stimulus has been a bi-partisan effort.

    • 0 avatar
      Daniel J

      I think anyone is allowed to attack the free press when the press ain’t free and most of the press have an agenda. Attacking the “press” is very different than many on the left pretty much telling folks who don’t agree with them to shut up.

      While I don’t think a Biden win will get us there, I think we are a few elections away from Stalin or Mao.

  • avatar
    imnormlurnot

    After reading most of these comments, I think when it comes to politics and economics, most of us can drive a car with an automatic transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      We’re a bunch of know-it-alls about everything, that’s why we’re the B&B

      ;-)

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Never could learn how to drive an automatic. Stick shift sure.

      Reminds me in high school back in the dark ages. I was used to manuals. I was driving a friend’s parents’ mid 60’s Electra 225 with a monster V8 and a two speed automatic. When I was going to turn a corner I went ahead and shifted to low with the PRNDL for some engine braking, but because I was used to a MT I pushed down the clutch. Oops, that’s not the clutch it’s the left half of an ultrasensitive brake pedal. Locked up all four with a lot of impressive noise.

      • 0 avatar
        imnormlurnot

        I did the same; changed from parents pickup with 3 on a tree, to parents Caprice with power brakes. The brakes were impressive: impressed the steering wheel into my face. Only my ego was bruised.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    For those who wrote any of the 118 comments, I have a question for you all:

    Was there any argument that changed your mind? I read a few comments and skipped the rest because why bother anymore. I still clicked, so hopefully Interscope or whoever now owns this property made $0.025 off of my eyeballs, but I’ve spent more time typing this comment than I did on the article.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • probert: Do whatever you want – it’s all happening regardless.
  • probert: You are talking about America, which is of course, gong to be a decade or so behind advanced countries. and...
  • probert: Yup – but Tesla was building from the ground up, ford has over 100 years of experience. Got to find...
  • probert: Sony and Motorola still make phones
  • ToolGuy: You know that dream you have where you forgot to do your homework? I wonder if Bill Ford (“A lifelong...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber