By on August 18, 2020

Image: Steph Willems/TTAC

The all-new 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 arrived with many new items in tow, but one of the most notable was the brand’s MultiPro tailgate —  a hinge-heavy piece of hardware capable of assisting box entry, acting as a workshop, serving up drinks, or blasting tunes.

For an automaker that criticized Ford so-called “Man Step,” MultiPro was akin to one of those staircase escalators for geriatric homeowners. Still, it possessed strong marketing potential, and it might soon appear on bowtie-badged trucks.

A report from GM Authority claims the tailgate-within-a-tailgate will appear in the Chevy table under a new name —  Multi-Flex, or perhaps MultiFlex.

The feature will reportedly appear sometime in the 2021 model year, or in the 2022 Silverado stable, if pandemic-related shutdowns pushed development efforts back too far. That’s the year GM plans to spice up its Silverado with a mid-cycle refresh, complete with a belatedly jazzy new interior. CarBuzz reports that GM Trucks confirmed the addition for mid-2021, adding that the name MultiFlex will appear on sales brochures.

The feature likely wouldn’t be made available on all Silverados, but it might serve to bring MultiPro/MultiFlex to the masses at a lower purchase price. Currently, MultiPro is only available on Sierra 1500s in SLT trim and above.

How exactly MultiFlex would differ from the GMC offering isn’t known, but GM Authority claims sources say one or two new features will set it apart from GMC’s unit. The outlet previously published photos of a 2020 Silverado HD test rig sporting just such a tailgate (cleverly disguised by a rubber mat folded over the rear of the bed).

As Chevy, and GM as a whole, finds itself facing its stiffest competition in years from a well-regarded Ram 1500 and new-for-2021 Ford F-150, any new feature capable of sparking consumer interest is a a piece of ammo it can use.

[Images: Steph Willems/TTAC]

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49 Comments on “Report: Chevrolet Silverado to Gain GMC’s Trick Tailgate...”


  • avatar
    JMII

    How about not making a truck that is so high up it requires a step to get into the bed? I know… too late as trucks these days are all about being bigly for the win.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      There hasn’t been a fullsize pickup in the last 50 years where the tailgate was less than a 3 foot “step”.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        For reference – my truck (VIN says 1995, but it has been lightly modified):

        Unloaded height:
        – Bumper “step” (by ball hitch/license plate, covered with 3M “Safety Walk Slip Resistant Step and Reflective Tread”) = 23.5″
        – Bumper (8″ deep [back to front], diamond plate pattern, semigloss black) = 29.5″
        – Bed (top of deck boards) = 33.5″

        I regularly do the two-step up into the bed hands-free (doable on the way down, but a little more tricky).

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          The bumper/deck heights haven’t changed much since ’95. Or ’75.

          Except it was much easier to jump in the bed since we were much younger.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            A neighbour still runs a 3rd generation CK (1990?) as his weekend ‘chores’ vehicle.

            I can stand beside it and look right over/across its cab. Can sit on its open tailgate and my feet can touch the ground. Can climb into or out of the ‘bed’ without requiring any assistance/steps.

            Try that with any new full sized pickup.

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            When I walk around my neighborhood its pretty clear to me newer trucks are higher up. My wife notices it even more since she is “height-challenged” at only 5’3″. This very site a picked up on this trend a decade ago: https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/01/why-ill-never-buy-a-new-pickup-truck/

            Same goes for mid-sizers – I’ve done a direct comparison between my ’02 Dakota and ’19 Ranger that a neighbor has. The Ranger’s bed is significantly further off the ground. I didn’t get my tape measure out but as soon as you walk up to the truck it was obvious.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Can you be a little more vague? There’s a huge difference between 1/2 tons and 3/4s+. Half tons are notably lower since 2010 including 4X4s.

            Yes pickup makers are definitely listening (to the whiners), at least the Big 3 are. Half ton 4X4s now use the same suspension and frame as 2wds and you can’t really tell them apart, except for “4X4” badging and stickers.

            3/4 ton 4X4s have always been way up high. But midsize pickups all use the same frame/suspenion too, regardless of powered axles. Except unlike 1/2 tons, they all use the 4X4 setup.

            It also keeps costs down, faster down the assembly line, etc.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “I can stand beside it and look right over/across its cab. Can sit on its open tailgate and my feet can touch the ground.”

            I wonder how much of this is just the proliferation of 4x4s. I can do this on my 2015, but it is 2wd. It seems like wày more trucks are 4wd that 30 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      We were so close.

      carscoops.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/03/PG8_Carscoop_0.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      Generally more travel with more robust suspension, generally a taller frame, generally bigger tires, larger percent of 4x4s, it all adds up. I don’t mind the taller beds- seems like we get a lot for it.

      Side note, my neighbor just got a new chevy truck. Its a gray color with body matched bumpers. It looks great. I’m not sure if these are growing on me or if this particular truck is just really dependent on color for how it looks.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        If it was truly an issue for most buyers, or even a decent small percentage, the trucks would conform. Or El Caminos and Rancheros would still be around and Hot sellers (I doubt they ever were).

        I prefer the occasional struggle with the bed (use). But it means I have a great combination of ground clearance and bed volume.

        The high sides mean I can have the bed full of expensive power/cordless tools, a generator, welder and materials, nothing bolted down, and it looks like an empty pickup parked across the road or lonely side of the parking lot.

        They do make sidesteps and nerf bars the run from wheelwell to wheelwell though. But the wheel spokes are big enough to fit a sneaker or boot into.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @DM: Now you’re just making excuses, like you always do. You were wrong about mid-sized trucks. You were wrong about compact trucks. Both have returned (or is very soon to return.) You are wrong about these tailgates too. The OEMs are making them, no matter how much you may claim they’re a stupid idea.

          Oh, and I wouldn’t leave my power/cordless tools out in the open bed even if the bed sides were too high to even see into it; I wouldn’t want them destroyed by weather. Same goes with the generator. I have a tool box in the truck under the leading edge of the folding tonneau cover which protects them from sun, rain and other weather while being capable of draining without damaging the tools should the box be open in a sudden downpour. Nice thing is, nobody can tell that box is there unless you know what you’re looking for.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The market changed. Ford was wrong too. And we’re still waiting for the compacts.

            It’s normally only for the day, and only the differing tools I’m going to use that day. It’s not always the same job and tools that can be damaged or I can’t afford to get stolen can get piled in the back seat in a pinch.

            I just don’t like the gas powered tools in the cab.

            Some days I’m just hauling materials/supplies and the tools stay at the job. Pickups do well (in the US) because sometimes all it takes is a tarp. And or rain or snow days (that catch you by surprise), you improvise or have the day off anyway.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @DM: Like I said, making excuses. You’re not willing to admit I was right about either of those, are you? Ford and Hyundai are both releasing a true (well, close enough, anyway) compact within the next two years and clearly the OEMs are realizing that they’ve got to change something to make their beds more accessible. Ford was first with their relatively flimsy “man step” thing in the tailgate but I think the Ram and GMC concepts are more elegant and functional. I think the Tesla one is one of the best because it actively tilts back to make the load bed even more accessible, with a tailgate that can serve as a ramp from ground to load floor. No steps needed.

            And the only reason pickup trucks are so large today is because they’re dodging–still–the fuel mileage/pollution fines that would be levied if they’d stayed at their original sizes. Trucks grew bigger to dodge the laws while cars grew smaller in the attempt to stay within the laws. Funny thing is that BEVs could bring the idea of a full-sized car back into realization and still offer 3x to 4x the equivalent fuel economy of their ICE ancestors. And we’re already seeing trucks become battery powered with at least three different brands and models within the next year or so.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Automakers can suggest trends, but they’re just following behind. They’re the tail getting wagged by the dog/consumers.

            What cars are getting smaller? A new Corolla is bigger than a ’94 Camry.

            Have ever seen a new Mustang parked next to a Fox Mustang? The difference is frackin’ mind blowing.

            Of course you can never compare apples to apples. Compare the footprint of a new RCSB fullsize pickup to any from the last 50 years.

            The slightly increased wheelbase and track gives better stability and more room (between the wheels) for disk brakes, front independents with 4X4 diffs, axles, U-joints, hubs, etc. while closer to the ground, as if they were 2wd in height.

            The current midsize 4X4 trucks don’t have the same room (up front) so they can’t use the 2wd Suspension. Consequently, to save/cut costs, all use the 4X4 frame/suspension.

            Of course when comparing vintage Mini trucks to new midsize, it’s as if the (ghost) extra cab 4X4 Mini trucks didn’t exist.

            Clearly it would neuter your entire rant if you ever compared apples to apples.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @DM: “Automakers can suggest trends, but they’re just following behind. They’re the tail getting wagged by the dog/consumers.”

            — Well, I’ll admit you’re getting closer but you’re still off the mark. It’s not the consumers wagging the dog, it’s the dealerships telling both the consumer and the OEMs what they want. True, color-painted cars have become monochromatic because the dealerships don’t want to risk having a certain-colored vehicle standing on the lot for months when it’s so easy to sell a generic-colored monstrosity–often for more–and tell the customer to repaint it themselves (or skin it.) Where we used to have variety, everything is sameness and people are getting sick and tired of it.

            The broadest variety in color is in one place, and even that isn’t very good because any color outside of monochromatic is either red or blue or in such a dark shade of another color as to be practically black! (That one place is Ford and its F-series trucks.) Oh, sure, they may offer some ‘unique’ color for a year and vary that year over year but that still doesn’t allow for personal individuality.

            “Have ever seen a new Mustang parked next to a Fox Mustang? The difference is frackin’ mind blowing.”
            — And its still smaller than a ’69 through ’73 Mustang, even if larger than a Fox.

            “Of course you can never compare apples to apples. Compare the footprint of a new RCSB fullsize pickup to any from the last 50 years.”
            — I have. The modern tailgate is a full foot higher than a 50-year-old model, even on the 2WD models. The body is up to three feet longer while the bed is up to two feet shorter, not counting the 8-foot-long-bed models which today are special-order models simply because they’re so long today. Their width may be similar but today’s trucks are still wider–when you don’t include the mirrors on each generation. Going crew cab simply made them bigger than ever while functionally reducing their utility as a personal utility vehicle. As I remarked elsewhere, they’re used far more as status symbols and ego boosters than true utility vehicles, now. Even essentially brand new I use my mid-sized truck far more than most modern full-sized trucks in a utilitarian manner.

            Oh, and those 50-year-old trucks at least had the option of a proper bed-side step both in front of and behind the rear wheel well so you could reach farther into the bed from the side. That’s not even available any more in modern trucks. Those side steps you mentioned for the modern trucks stop well short of the wheel well for most and simply don’t resume after the wheel…not even for long-bed models.

            “The slightly increased wheelbase and track gives better stability and more room (between the wheels) for disk brakes, front independents with 4X4 diffs, axles, U-joints, hubs, etc. while closer to the ground, as if they were 2wd in height.”
            — As if they truly need all of that. No, when a bloomin’ Ford Fiesta can have disk brakes, U-joints, hubs, etc. while sitting FAR closer to the ground than even a 2WD truck, such height is not necessary even for a 4×4 model and wasn’t even available as a factory option (the height, I mean) 50 years ago. Jacking them up was always an aftermarket modification and still is. A factory truck simply doesn’t need 9″+ ground clearance, even with 4×4. That height reduces stability, not enhances it.

            “The current midsize 4X4 trucks don’t have the same room (up front) so they can’t use the 2wd Suspension. Consequently, to save/cut costs, all use the 4X4 frame/suspension.”
            — Irrelevant, as stated above.

            “Of course when comparing vintage Mini trucks to new midsize, it’s as if the (ghost) extra cab 4X4 Mini trucks didn’t exist.”
            — Yet they were still very visibly smaller in every dimension than modern mid-sizers. I didn’t get to take a photo of my ’97 Ranger next to my ’19 Colorado because I sold the Ranger one month before I took delivery of the Chevy.

            “Clearly it would neuter your entire rant if you ever compared apples to apples.”
            — Except that I just did compare apples to apples and managed to refute every argument–again.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Dealers don’t wag the dog either. Tomato/Tomato.

            Except we’ve been through this 1,000 times. You don’t want 15 inch wheels on a fullsize. Or drum brakes anywhere.

            Higher ground clearance is automatic.

            The frames on 1/2 tons are a foot tall in some places (near the center) and you certainly don’t want to go back to flimsy.

            Also (to save costs), the Heavy Duty pickups share the platform with 1/2 tons so of course they’re using the same frames, different gauge.

            But there you go again. Your old Ranger was a 2wd regular cab. If this is what you call “apples to apples”, I don’t know what more I can say and can’t really help you. (No one can…)

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    How about a MultiFlex tailgate as an aftermarket replacement for the Colorado as well? The benefits are more than just being a couple of steps up into a too-high bed, after all.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      It wouldn’t surprise me if they add it as an option in the smaller trucks in the future. However, unless they do it before the redesign don’t count on there being an option to retrofit your truck.

      I’m sure that if the aftermarket tried to produce it GM would try to stop them from infringing on the patents they hold for their design.

      On the other hand it took the aftermarket to prevent it from banging into an installed hitch that isn’t hooked up to a trailer at the time.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Improvise. You’re a genuine truck owner now, and this close to a lumber jack and whatnot. Try carrying a couple milk crates back there. One just for the Bungees. You can use one for a step and the other for small items you’ll need to retrieve later.

      If you can’t reach a milk crate while still standing on the ground (without high heels), try a rope ladder.

      My mother stands 5’1″ (with a Tundra) and developed a system on her own. She zip-tied a plastic commercial bread-tray to the back corner of the bed, so when she drops the tailgate, her groceries or whatever are right where she put them, on the left rear corner.

      Truck owners find individualized workarounds that work for them. They could be 7’1″ and still need a reach tool for some trucks or situations, for whatever reasons. Like bad knees.

      Except I realize some here aren’t looking for any kind of solutions and love to hear themselves snivel and rant.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @DM: “Except I realize some here aren’t looking for any kind of solutions and love to hear themselves snivel and rant.”

        — And you’re one of the worst of them. There are workarounds for almost everything BUT…

        There shouldn’t NEED to be workarounds.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          You’d rather pay $1,200 or whatever for a man-step?

          Half the products I buy get modified in some way for my specific needs or use. I first go to the discount rack.

          For some I have to get out the plasma cutter and welder for.
          The pickup bed reach/enter is an easy one and I move on with my life.

          Ask me why I prefer the pickup beds that are challenge?

          I’ve come to expect that most products (at least what’s in my price range) are for the average user, and definitely not me specifically.

          Maybe I’m the one that’s being silly, but I’m all about the quality of life, least struggle, etc. If I squint a little, I live like a millionaire, except on a Blue Collar, flea market, yard sale budget .

          I’m set to retire a multi millionaire, thanks to my cheap fixes, life hacks, going with the flow, etc, without suffering too much day to day. Or at all.

          Life’s too short for the not happy, unsatisfied, complaining, etc.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @DM: “You’d rather pay $1,200 or whatever for a man-step?”

            — No. I’d pay it for the cargo management features and just take advantage of the fact that it also allows a form of staircase.

            I like the fact it can extend the bed and still proved a stop to reduce the risk of a load sliding backwards out of the bed.

            I like the fact that it can partially lower, offering another way to limit the movement of a lumber load that’s braced on the lip of the tailgate with an additional location to tie it down so it won’t slip from side to side and potentially risk smashing into another truck to either side of yours.

            I like the fact that it offers a way to lean farther into the bed to pull out your load without having to climb into the bed to reach it. (Ram’s split tailgate offers this function as well, though lacks the previous two features.)

            Simply put, the steps, while convenient, are not the reason I would purchase this tailgate but it is a feature I wouldn’t ignore, either.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            OK, but in the meantime, you’re just going to continue the complaining and live disgruntled? Or adapt and seek solutions for now?

            I must have circled the planet several times with the tailgate down and material/objects/furniture sticking past. I’ve never lost anything and rarely tie/bungee anything down.

            Most things want to shift forward if anything. All those fancy man-steps seem like dead weight to me. It may cost $1,200 to buy, but at least $5,000 to replace.

            It’s an easy decision for me.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “but at least $5,000 to replace.”

            For someone preaching ingenuity and adaptation for several comments you sure threw in the towel fast.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Even the basic used ones are $800 minimum. Plus a gallon of Bondo. The man-step replacement cost would make it a target for thieves. Plus I’ve taco’d too many tailgates to count.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @DM: As usual, you don’t pay attention to what people write. Why should I wait until you tell me to do something that I did when I purchased the truck? I knew the problems before I bought the truck and ordered the parts and components I wanted even before the truck was delivered. It’s not perfect but then, the truck itself isn’t perfect. But it does serve the need better than “… zip-tied a plastic commercial bread-tray to the back corner of the bed, so when she drops the tailgate, her groceries or whatever are right where she put them, on the left rear corner,” and looks better, too.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @DM: “Plus I’ve taco’d too many tailgates to count.”

            — A very revealing point about you. In owning four different pickups I’ve never “taco’d” a tailgate once. Doing a job right the first time means you never have to go back to fix it later.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Clearly you prefer to swim upstream, fight the system, than go with the flow..

            I don’t have time for that. I’m always scrambling/finding solutions, putting out fires, it never ends.

            When you’re actually using your truck and not just for work, but always pressed for time, juggling phone calls/texts, food/drinks, etc, backing up constantly while maneuvering in tight spaces, squeezing between forklifts, pallets and whatnot, stuff is going to happen.

            I’ve also taco’d tailgates by putting too much weight on them and even trailer mishaps. I’m always buying back windows too. So what it happens.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @DM: “Clearly you prefer to swim upstream, fight the system, than go with the flow.”

            — That’s what being an individual is all about; making your own path–so long as it doesn’t hurt others. Because of it, I was able to fix avionics systems faster than anybody else, while following the rules. It isn’t the rules holding you back, it’s your ability to use those rules to greatest benefit. Knowing WHAT to fix is far more important than knowing how to fix it and the best mechanics and technicians use their experience to know what tests to make and how to analyze those tests to determine what needs fixing. After that, following the book on the fix is simplicity itself.

            Being an individual doesn’t mean you have to go against the flow; rather, you need to get ahead of the flow and help steer its course. That’s something you seem unable to grasp. Instead of putting out fires, you need to learn how to prevent them so that you don’t have to work as hard or spend as much money. It can end if you can just figure out how to get ahead of it.

            You’re stuck in a rat race and you don’t want to acknowledge that. Everything you just stated shows a lack of knowledge and planning and that’s not something I can teach you. You’ve got to learn how to think for yourself instead of following somebody else all the time.

            Think! Plan! Get ahead of the game!

            Once you figure out how to do that, you won’t be wasting your time and money trying to fix your mistakes.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            If by “individual” you mean chronic complainer instead of fixer and move on’r, I agree.

            You never said how you work around the “problem”, which seems isolated to a few snivelers and a relatively small percent of pickup owners.

            If you’re not actively searching for a solution, but obviously complaining nonstop, they’ve got “a word” for folks like you, but I won’t use it here..

            What “Rat Race”? I’m 52 and retired. I still “work” for myself and choose when to work, which is often an 80+ hour week.

            A banged up truck isn’t a “mistake” anymore than a damaged race car. I put in 3+ hours today and moved the truck in and out of tight spaces at least 100 times.

            Often you’re dealing with glare, sweat in your eyes, some spatial disorientation, fatigue and other, while your head’s on a swivel, with dusty mirrors, etc.

            Twice I’ve failed to put it in Park (last year) as I jumped out, one time I caught it, and the other it Reversed into a retaining wall. Let’s just say I built the wall to spec or better..

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @dm (You don’t deserve capitalization any more):

            “You never said how you work around the “problem”, which seems isolated to a few snivelers and a relatively small percent of pickup owners.”
            — Actually, I did say; you just chose not to see it.

            “If you’re not actively searching for a solution, but obviously complaining nonstop, they’ve got a “word” for folks like you, but I won’t use use it here.”
            — The solution is to make your viewpoint known and obviously there are more voices for the changes than there are against them, or said changes wouldn’t be happening.

            The rest of your argument proves my point about you.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            So your “solution” is going online and making a lot of noise on the subject? Then sitting around, hoping GM one day hears your sniveling rants? Then does exactly what you want?

            Bless your heart… But you’re not really using the business end of your pickup much, are you? What, a couple times a year? Or why wouldn’t you make your life easier in the mean time?

            Or do you prefer to struggle? I know you prefer to complain. But if GM does respond to your “solution” or fix, and does it to your complete satisfaction, are you going to trade your truck in for one? Or spend the $5,000 to upgrade yours?

            Besides, in the optimal scenario, you rarely have to get up in the bed. Remember those ’80s Mini Trucks? You could reach any part of the bed with your feet on the ground.

            What if nothing gets done in 10 years? Will you keep on waiting, hoping and dreaming for GM to “fix” it forever?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @dm: Poor boy; you just don’t want to understand, do you?A pity. I’m not struggling nearly as much as you are with my truck. It does what I need, even if it’s not perfect for my wants. Don’t you get it? I’ve made my wants known and have built enough of a following that the OEMs have heard my wishes and acted upon them. It’s only a matter of time and I, for one, am patient.

            When the time comes for change, I will make the change that is most efficient for me, whether that by modifying my existing truck or replacing it with a new one. I won’t know until that time which is the better choice. I will remind you, however, that when I buy new, I tend to keep the vehicle for 10 years, plus or minus a year or so depending on circumstances. In 10 years, they might have the exact capabilities I want, including smaller size and maybe even, by then, be fully battery powered with 500+ miles of range and have the ability to go anywhere I wan’t without my having to touch the steering wheel (though I, like you, prefer to drive the vehicle manually as much as possible.)

            And you just made my final point for me: “Remember those ’80s Mini Trucks? You could reach any part of the bed with your feet on the ground.” That’s exactly what I want in a small truck. What I carry most of the time isn’t things thieves would want to pilfer and if it is, it’s usually secured tightly enough that they’d have to work to get it out, assuming it’s light enough to be lifted over the side of the bed in the first place. And I don’t beat my truck up in carrying anything because I load it carefully and secure it so it can’t move. That includes any lumber I might carry. Thieves want things of value that are light and easy to carry… those sorts of things almost never go into the bed and if they do, again, they’re not going anywhere until I take them out.

            As for your last question: It certainly didn’t take the OEMs 10 years to make the changes I’ve wanted so far. Again, I’m patient. Unlike you.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Wow! Your little crusade and childish tirades have forced auto (pickup) makers into action??

            Then by all means carry on………………………………………………………………………………….

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You’ll figure it out… some day. ;p ;p ;p ;p ;p

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s amazing you’ve actually changed the market! And thanks for not canceling fullsize pickups!!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @dm: The market is changing to come closer to my wants than the other way around. Full sized pickups are still too big and I think once the “compacts” are established, the current mid-sizers will evolve to become the full-sizers of the future. When my Colorado can tow more than a Ram Eco-diesel (and the diesel version even more than that) then we’re already seeing where the truck industry is headed. It’s just a matter of time.

  • avatar

    GM should spend more money improving their rubbish interiors.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      akear-
      Did you actually READ THE ARTICLE? They are upgrading the interiors as well.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        It remains to be seen if THAT helps. GM is grasping since RAM so embarrassingly ate their lunch, put GM’s crank in the dirt, and stepped on it.

        Don’t misunderstand. I used to be a HUGE GM fan. My first-bought new pickup truck was an 1988 Silverado Extended Cab Long Bed with the 350 V8 and THM350. Not perfect but on par for those days.

        But what has evolved since then is not worth having, at any price. Just the Chinese-made parts and assembly in Mexico should make a buyer wary and scream Caveat Emptor.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @hdc: So spoiled! I’m quite happy with my GM interior. Well, except that I have a back seat I didn’t want cluttering up what should be a flat load floor behind the driver’s seat. And I’m not sure that taking the seats out would even then give me a flat enough floor for what I wanted to carry in there.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            My 5 year old F150’s rear seats fold up on the back of the cab and reveal a totally flat load floor. You pull a lever and fold it up…takes like 5 seconds and there is no hump in the floor. Is this not something the midsized trucks do? It looks like the Ranger retains a hump back there as well though the seat bottom can be removed on the extended cabs.

            This is actually something I use pretty frequently and losing it would be another compromise I’d have to make all in the name of making it easier to park my truck in the garage. As such, I’ll let it stay outside since it is, you know…a truck.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Went and looked out of curiosity…Looks like the flat rear load floor in the rear is a RAM (Not Classic) and Ford thing. You are correct that it is quite handy.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Art Vandelay: Crew cab or extended? What do those seats rest on when down? From what I’ve seen, over the last few years in particular, nearly everyone has gone to using a huge plastic plinth (with hollows in them for “small parts storage” that are A) difficult to remove by one person and B) take up almost all of the floor space under the seats. Last time I looked, even last year’s Honda did this; pretty much sacrificing the whole reason for having those seats foldable in the first place. I’m not absolutely certain about Fords but I recall looking at extended cabs from most, if not every, available brands and this was true of most, if not all, of them. I’m not a Ford fan so I didn’t give the recent Fords more than a cursory look and I certainly wasn’t going to by a four-cylinder engine to tow a 7000#+ travel trailer, even if the turbo does give it 300 horses.

            I don’t trust turbos that well in the first place and I’ve seen what happens to horsepower if that thing blows under load; especially when it’s trying to pull not only the vehicle’s weight but an additional 1.5x that weight on the tail. I bought what I did because I wanted a non-turbo engine capable of pulling that kind of weight without a V8 fuel-hog under the hood for those predominant, non-towing times. (Maybe I should have gone for Fiat’s 28-liter four instead? :p )

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Mine is a Crew Cab, but the normal extended cabs have the same arrangement. The seats don’t fold down…The seat bottom folds up and the whole affair hangs on the rear cab wall. There are some small bins right against the back wall where I keep my hitch and some ratchet straps. It makes for a nice large flat area.

            Now you can screw it up and order a stereo with a subwoofer under the rear seats, but mine is an XLT and I didn’t get that.

            It is a handy arrangement. Stuff like that may contribute to taller trucks…You need the floor higher or the trans and driveshaft lower to avoid the hump in the floor but even if it raises it up I’d make that trade.

            And if a Turbo ever blows on my truck, I’d probably replace the turbo before continuing to haul. I lost compression on a cylinder in a TBI 350 on an old Chevy I used to have due to a busted ring land IIRC and I certainly didn’t keep on towing…That thing didn’t have the power for it either.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Art Vandalay: Sounds like Ford did something right, then. Too bad I’ve had nothing but bad luck with the brand.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Vulpine, I had to take out the rear seat a couple of times on my Silverado to fit some tall, bulky items when the bed was already loaded to the max.

            It’s not a flat floor and neither is it on the Tundra, when you remove the rear seat (for dog kennels as an example.)

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