By on July 16, 2020

Auto plants across the U.S. are a beehive of activity as workers (and their bosses) seek to make up for lost time. The two-month coronavirus shutdown drained inventories, yet the virus that sparked the unprecedented closure of workplaces across the nation hasn’t gone away.

As you read yesterday, the ongoing pressures reportedly forced one Detroit-based automaker to take desperate measures just to keep the taps running. So Detroit Three automakers probably reacted with trepidation after hearing the U.S.’s most car-heavy state isn’t afraid to pump the brakes once again.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer issued a warning yesterday, saying that lockdown measures could return if residents don’t abide by a mask-wearing mandate designed to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus.

“If Michiganders don’t mask up when we go out in public, cases could rise and we could be forced to close down more of our businesses, including auto manufacturing plants that employ thousands,” Whitmer said at a Lansing press conference, per Bloomberg. “A second wave of this virus could be absolutely devastating.”

It’s a scenario that would hit Michigan-based automakers hard in the wallet. The country’s best-selling vehicle, the Ford F-150, is assembled in Dearborn, along with a slew of other high-margin moneymakers assembled throughout the southeastern expanse of the mitten. And Whitmer’s liable to do it if things get bad, if past actions tell us anything.

Following the reopening of businesses and the resumption of auto production, COVID-19 cases predictable rose again, though the case count hasn’t matched the first wave of the virus that swept through Michigan in March. State-level data (graph 2) shows a post-opening bump beginning in late June. New cases on July 15th were the highest recorded since mid-May.

Because things can get tout of hand in a hurry, vigilance and, yes, compliance is necessary to maintain some kind of quasi-normal society and economy. Businesses need to generate revenue, otherwise we’re all pooched.

Where exactly the line that Michigan can’t cross sits, triggering new preventative measures, remains to be seen. Or not, if things go well.

[Image: General Motors]

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63 Comments on “Read My Lips: Michigan’s Governor Issues a Warning...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    My theory is that the rise in CV cases is directly related to the heat index outside. Temperate weather makes it comfortable to be outdoors, but very cold or very hot weather drives people back indoors, and in closer proximity to one another.

    Evidence of this is the initial spike in the North and Northeast during winter, then a drop in late spring, followed by a sudden rise in the South, then nearly everywhere. Most of the country is in a typical summer heat wave right now, sheltering in their recirculating A/C.

    An unknown for me is the effect of being inside a very large building, like a car plant. Personal proximity is part of the job, but the ceilings are high and in some cases could be similar to being outdoors.

    In any case, the same decisions face every school, sporting event, business, and group. A back-and-forth policy will drive people crazy.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @SCE to AUX – the WHO and other professionals are indicating that under some circumstances i.e. enclosed spaces that airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 may occur. For the most part droplet precautions apply. It appears that the outdoor protests have not contributed to an increase in cases. That could be due to increased “clean” airflow and UV damage to the virus.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      SCE, opinions are like my backside. This guesswork by non-medical pro’s such as yourself is like what I do when I guess what’s wrong with my car. Sometimes I’m right, usually I’m not.

      Leave it to the pro’s who will sometimes get it wrong, but will also have a knowledge base to draw from that you do not.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        “Leave it to the pros”…

        The Titanic was designed and constructed by accomplished professionals at the top of their game.

        “The Experts” have had some serious serious lapses around this pandemic.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @ToolGuy: “The Titanic was designed and constructed by accomplished professionals at the top of their game.”

          — … And sent on its first voyage with construction crews still aboard and incomplete due to politics.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @Toolguy, blaming the designers of the Titanic is like someone who blows their brand new F-150 through a red light and into a transport truck and then blaming the designers of their truck.

          The Titanic had 2 sister ships. Both of which successfully crossed the Atlantic multiple times. Although one was sunk in WWI by a mine.

          • 0 avatar

            Notable lessons were requiring a 24/7 radio watch on big ships and making sure there was a 1:1 passenger-lifeboat ratio. One theory which seems credible had to do with a temperature inversion affecting visiblity as well.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Arthur Dailey: … And the other was sunk by a U-boat.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            @Arthur Dailey: OK. The captain (another expert) was no slouch either:
            https://mollybrown.org/captain-smith/

  • avatar
    R Henry

    “Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer issued a warning yesterday, saying that lockdown measures could return if residents don’t abide by a mask-wearing mandate designed to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus.”

    How will the good Governor measure the extent of mask wearing? What is the target threshold of compliance? 84.32658%? How was that target derived?

    The word “arbitrary” gets used a lot, and it is precisely this kind of “warning” (threat) which correctly earns the moniker.

    • 0 avatar
      Giskard

      There really isn’t anything arbitrary about this. Covid cases are on the rise which, if left unchecked, will overrun hospital capacity. If people wear masks it will reduce the spread and cases will level off and decline. You don’t measure the number of people wearing masks – you measure the number of new active covid cases. It seems pretty straightforward to me.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      80% was target. They apparently thought 80% compliance could be more effective than a lockdown. Study pointed to: https://arxiv.org/pdf/2004.13553.pdf

      I think it’s more that they (politicians) are told a number and why but they don’t have all the facts at hands to explain why it isn’t arbitrary.

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    We’re still in the first wave, Ms. Whitmer. The virus was never eradicated and the hotspots were never contained. A second wave could be devastating, sure, but it’s going to take at least another 6 months to figure out what happens with the first wave.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    For greatest safety, the goal should be 100%. I know there are people who don’t like them and even people who may forget them on occasion but if you want to stop this spread cold, then wear your mask and try to make sure everybody else does. Even if you’re wearing your mask, avoid anyone not wearing it by no less than 6 feet of separation. Your mask doesn’t prevent YOU from getting it but it does indicate that you’re unwilling to spread it, even if you’re non-symptomatic. The mask keeps you from breathing on them and therefore if they are wearing one, they’re not breathing on you. Get it?

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      We’re still breathing in the same atmosphere, so we are going to transmit virus particles to each other. But the mask at least stops SOME of the particles. I, for one, would rather breathe in 10 virus particles rather than 100. That initial load of virus might make the difference between an asymptomatic illness and a deadly illness. We don’t absolutely know how much difference it makes, but I have a family to take care of, so I can’t really go YOLO on this.

      I don’t understand why some people get so bent out of shape about having to wear a mask. In my state, Pennsylvania, the rules are pretty reasonable. If you are within 6 feet of another person not of your household, you have to wear a mask. If you are outdoors and more than 6 feet away, you don’t have to wear a mask. If you are working in a private office, you don’t have to wear a mask. If you are in a public working space, you have to wear a mask. It all makes sense to me. I don’t like it, but I will put up with it for now to make the country safer.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @SPPPP – See my reply to @SCE to AUX. The virus needs a droplet of liquid to transmit and survive. It can survive in very small droplets and has some survival time on a surface.
        You make a valid point about number of “viral particles”. Viral load is what will determine your body’s ability to fight it off. A small “load” could be fought off but not a huge “load”.
        The metaphor of a few soldiers charging your defensive position versus thousands is the simplest comparison.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Opposition to doing something simple for the common good shows just how far American narcissism has gone. Justifying this behavior then becomes a game of blaming vast left-wing conspiracies and the R’s that the Left has brainwashed.

      “Nobody’s gonna tell me what to do”
      “The data is fake”
      “People are being counted twice”
      “Only the weak die”
      “Hospitals are empty”
      “I feel fine”

      …and on and on.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I agree, well said

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        People with a distrust of the government typically came about it honestly though. Mine came about as a result of that whole “WMD” bit and grew in the years that followed.

        I don’t see this as a conspiracy or malice…just good old fashioned incompetence…another impression I came about honestly lol.

        I wear a mask and observe guidelines because it is common sense and I’m not generally a d!ck but no, I don’t especially believe they have any real handle on actual numbers or how to get a handle on this and people will suffer needlessly as a result. At the end of the day, all you can do is look out for number one.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Yep, if I’ve learned anything from all of this is to do your own research then do what you need to do to protect yourself

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Healthy distrust of government makes sense. But what we’re dealing with here is healthy distrust of basically EVERYTHING – science, good will, medicine, even common damn sense. It’s distrust for the sake of distrust. That goes way beyond distrust of government – it’s plain old cynicism, to the 100th power. It’s almost like nihilism.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Like most things, mask wearing was made political by Trump. By appealing to distrust that many people have, he found a receptive audience.

            Unfortunately, WHO and other healthcare pro’s got initial estimate wrong. Some said 3-15% of the population would die from this – a data point irresponsibly repeated here by someone on this comment board. Others said we would get a reprieve in the Summer months.

            Distrust isn’t just sewn by governmental incompetence. It’s also a result of those in public health making wildly wrong guesses so they get attention.

            Lots of blame to go around.

    • 0 avatar
      Kendahl

      Nobody talks about it but the key to stopping the pandemic is to reduce the transmission rate below one infected person infecting one previously uninfected person. If the transmission rate is one to one, the pandemic will continue indefinitely at a constant level. If it’s one to many, the pandemic will explode which is what’s happening in several states right now.

      The virus is not a self sustaining life form. It needs hosts to perpetuate itself. The trick is to deprive it of hosts. There are several ways to accomplish this. Some are better than others.

      The best would be massive immunization. An immune person is a dead end for the virus. However, we won’t have a vaccine until at least next year and it won’t be 100% effective. Still, it will make a difference. The most important factor will be the number of prospective hosts that become off limits to the virus.

      For now, the best we can do is to stay away from infected people. This is difficult since they are contagious before they know they are infected. In addition, there are essential jobs that must be filled regardless of risk. It would be even worse to shut down public utilities, the medical system, police, fire and EMS services, food production and distribution. No matter how careful they are, workers in those fields will get sick and infect their colleagues.

      Even though masks provide very limited protection to individuals, they do help by limiting contamination of the atmosphere surrounding infected individuals. It gets back to cutting down the number of people infected by one person with the virus.

      No matter what we do or don’t do, the pandemic will come to an end after the virus begins to run out of vulnerable hosts. In the worst case, it will be after a large fraction of the population catches it and recovers. The cost will be a huge number of deaths of those not strong enough to hang onto life until their own immune systems defeat the virus. We went through the same 100 years ago with the Spanish Flu. About 30 million Americans caught it and two thirds of a million died. Scaled up to today’s population, that would be 100 million cases and 2 million deaths.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Kendahl – Even if a good vaccine is developed one does not get 100% seroconversion. The other question is how long will immunity last. more experts are believing that herd immunity will only come with a vaccine with seroconversion of at least 80-90 % of the population.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Batten down the hatches .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I’m happy to wear a mask, but for me and my family to wear masks, I need to be able to obtain masks.

    If you tell me a mask is a good idea (and it is), then a “real” mask is better than a homemade “face covering”. Face covering is better than nothing, but I’d like a N95 or KN95 equivalent, without the exhalation valve that defeats the purpose. [I’ll even wear a full-face 3M/Honeywell type respirator, if they were available, which they generally aren’t.]

    The U.S. “full court press” for mask production has been embarrassingly weak. Ford is bombarding me with commercials that show N95-type masks with a Ford logo on them. The reality is that Ford are producing such masks *for use by Ford*. Good for them, and better to produce some masks than to produce no masks. But the way the masks are presented in their ads would be equivalent to Karen down the street making masks for her immediate family members and putting her family crest on them and then posting on Instagram that she’s a hero. She’s not a hero, she’s covering her own backside. At full production, Ford plans to have 80 employees producing face masks. With 85,000 employees in the U.S. this is equivalent to a 0.1% effort – like me spending 81 seconds per day on an issue that I regard as a high priority.

    [And don’t look now, but over half of the “American” Ford Motor Company employees work outside the U.S.]

    I picked up a four-pack of face shields at the warehouse store the other day, for around 5 bucks. Produced in “evil” China. Where are my U.S.-produced face shields?

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Try Ebay, they have thousands of masks many US made

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        If ebay is the answer, why are “Grave Shortages of Protective Gear” (NY Times) still being reported at hospitals?

        https://tinyurl.com/ybz3bq8j

        [I have some issues with FDR, but he would have *crushed* this one.]

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @ToolGuy
      In a professional setting N95’s or any mask certified as a respirator requires “FIT” testing. That means you are taught to put on the mask. You are taught to do a “seal” check and then you are tested to see if that mask actually seals to your face or if it leaks.
      Anyone buying N95’s who haven’t gone through the process are just wasting their money. Under those circumstances you might as well buy a standard mask.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        This is a lesson I learned the hard way courtesy of a little room and a bunch of CS gas pellets.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        @Lou_BC, I painted my truck with real live 2K ‘death paint’ (isocyanate) and didn’t smell fumes during the process – I know how to wear a respirator and I know how to seal check it. And if we were serious about masks anyone could be trained regarding the fit issues (the Ford employees in the current commercials have apparently been trained?).

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          My point is simply that if you want to wear a N95 you need to know how to use it and pass a FIT test. I do not know your background so if you are trained and experienced with them great. Most people aren’t.
          Respirators aren’t necessary for COVID-19 unless you are in very close contact with people in very high risk situations. I’m trained and participate in drills to manage high risk infectious diseases like Ebola.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Weird. A lib wants to shut down businesses.

    People need to realize that illnesses are contracted every single day and we don’t shut down.

    People also need to realize that this so-called “surge” is more by design than organic. Hospitals reporting anyone with symptoms as a positive cause. Positive antibody tests being considered as a positive test. You have test kits being sent in having never Boucher a human coming back positive and then you have medical organizations reporting only positive tests and not total number of tests. So some medical facilities are showing positive tests in the 90% range when in reality it’s under 10%.

    Anyone with a brain knew this corona cold was nonsense when it wasn’t a concern when there were riots. Our media and political “leaders” literally put corona on pause while the riots took place.

    Just take your hydroxychloroquine and enjoy life. No need for a (completely ineffective) mask or shutting down businesses. All that nonsense is to drive a particular result of the election this fall.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      138,000 people have died from “nonsense”, but yet you’re still here. Too bad bullsh!t isn’t fatal

      Don’t forget hydroxychloroquine is useless without a Clorox chaser

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “ Don’t forget hydroxychloroquine is useless without a Clorox chaser”

        Oh so you’re still of the mindset that hydroxychloroquine does nothing despite studies saying it’s a fantastic treatment for the corona cold?

        TDS right there folks. Don’t let facts get in the way of hate (that should be the Democrat party motto)

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          EBFlex, you are starting to sound “out there” when you criticize the response to a *new virus*. To continue with my trailer analogy from above, if you wake up and find an unknown firearm on the floor of your trailer, you don’t check if it’s loaded by pointing it at your dog and pulling the trigger. You assume it’s deadly until the point at which you have enough information to call it safe.

          And frankly, the sky’s the limit for the final death toll from this virus. We don’t even know how long immunity to re-infection lasts yet. Maybe you could survive it in 2020 and die from it in 2021. We just don’t know yet.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @SPPPP – great metaphor but in EB’s case, you should have suggested pressing the barrel firmly against the posterior palate of the oropharynx before squeezing the trigger. Aiming at a poor dog, what were you thinking? LOL

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The USA has 4% of the world’s population but 25% of the world’s cases. At the current rated of spread, there will be 250,000 less voters come election day.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @Lou_BC: … And most of those missing are going to be Trump supporters.

      • 0 avatar
        Daniel J

        Lou_BC,

        Because everything exists in a vacuum?

        First, I don’t believe ANYTHING coming out of China. I believe they have many more cases than they are reporting.

        Now, in saying that, what makes our country unique is the what drives our case count up. We have high mobility. We have a healthy distrust for government. We have a stronger value in individual independance than many other countries. Unlike many other countries who have dealt with pandemics in the last few decades, we haven’t, as a country, had to deal with that. We were less prepared because of it.

        People would have lost their collective minds if Trump executed some sort of Marshal law back in March. No one wants Trump with that sort of power. I know I don’t.

        • 0 avatar
          Daniel J

          And of course everyone talks about how lockdowns were working with many states early on. The problem with looking at data, especially in the April and May, is simply that in the south, people were spending much more time outdoors. Its also a psychological factor that I know first hand that early on people were willing not to go into public places because of all the unknowns. Eventually people just couldn’t deal with not living their lives as normal anymore and eventually started going out, before and after the end of lockdowns.

          I’ve read from several experts stating that locking down again will have some impact, but won’t slow it down like it did early on because people will simply congregate at home with friends and family, something many weren’t willing to do in April and May.

          The other issue is that when the lockdowns occured in much of the south, everyone piled into HD, lowes, and Walmart. Now they can disperse throughout many other retailers to reduce proximity. I know when they opened retailers up that walking into department stores felt so much safer than walking into Lowes when Lowes was slammed

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Daniel J – Vulpine has multiple valid points. Those who have a “healthy” distrust for government are the one’s not trusting the medical community.
            Part of the problem in the USA is politicians took the lead. Every country with good COVID-19 controls let the medical experts call the shots.
            Another issue is the simple fact that the USA does not have universal health care coverage for the population.
            It is a huge problem that has been mismanaged across the board. Other countries have made mistakes but recovered form them rather quickly.

          • 0 avatar
            SPPPP

            Daniel J, I think the effect of a second lockdown will be reduced simply because we let the virus spread too far. We stopped travel from China too late, we stopped travel from Europe too late, and we never really stopped travel across state lines. Now there are so many cases out there that it won’t be as easy to stop the spread anymore.

            If you will pardon the goofy analogy, I think it’s like if your carpet is on fire in 2 places from a couple of dropped matches. When you fight the fire, you have to put it all the way out. If you get distracted and go answer the phone, the fire will flare up again. You may come back to find that half your carpet is now burning. You can’t put out that much fire with just one beer. Now you have to waste a whole 6-pack putting it out. Too bad that you didn’t stick with the job the first time, or you would have gotten off much easier. But if you hem and haw too long over how much beer it will take, your whole trailer might burn down.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Daniel J: I do agree with some of what you say but at the same time you make so many errors! You claim that, “We have a healthy distrust for government” and yet, those very same distrustful people are doting on everything our current President says, up to and including actively poisoning themselves when he ‘muses’ about drinking bleach or disinfectant to kill the disease. That is by no means a “healthy distrust.” Those same distrustful people are actively ignoring–nay, going even farther than that, they are actively protesting–recommendations to protect their lives in the name of “personal freedoms” and many of these active protestors have fallen victim to the disease AND DIED of it! This is not a “healthy distrust.” Rather, it is an unhealthy trust in the one man who tells them what they want to hear, no matter how dangerous it may be to personal and national health.

          Sure, SOME people would have lost their collective minds if Trump had executed some sort of marshal law early on–but far more people would trust him NOW if he had. Instead, his approval ratings at their lowest point in his administration–and that’s really saying something considering how low it’s been for most of his 3.5 year ‘reign.’ Many people who voted for him the first time around have already stated they will NOT vote for him this time around. If he achieves that Electoral College majority again this time, it will be because he and the Republican Party heads stole it. I would not be surprised to see some sort of coup happen to force him out of office if that happens.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Funny that Trump hasn’t said anything as bad as the little elf doctor and his gross miscalculations regarding this cold.

            And how do you square all the things I brought up? There is clearly an effort to boost the numbers for some reason other than accurate reporting. You cannot say that counting random symptoms with no test and positive antibody tests as positive cases is genuine and honest. It’s flat out corruption. And when that level of corruption is called out (by outlets like Fox 35 in Orlando) the story is buried faster than we can imagine.

            It just isn’t that bad. The hysteria is completely unwarranted. You start counting the deaths from the flu or other benign illnesses and they would look far worse than they are and all the mouth breathers would be clamoring for masks etc.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @EBFlex – “You start counting the deaths from the flu or other benign illnesses”

            You are completely clueless.

            Benign by definition means “not harmful in effect”

            Anything causing premature death is NOT benign.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @EBComrade: is it your goal to have enough of the population of the USA weakened by this virus that it creates sufficient chaos for the Kremlin to enact a Red Dawn scenario?

      Because what you post has zero scientific or medical credibility.

  • avatar
    Rich Fitzwell

    With any luck, Biden will pick her for his VP and that will get her out of Michigan.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    It is a sad state of this country that we cannot fight this scourge together because we are so divided nowadays.

    United we stand, divided we fall!

    Both Putin and Xi must be absolutely delighted at our self inflicted wounds.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @schmitt trigger – rugged individualism is a great myth propagated to sell the masses on rampant self serving unfettered greed. Wars are won by unity. Countries thrive with unity. The “real” Rambo is a dead vet who’s name is carved into black marble.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        We can agree to disagree but I still believe that individualism is a virtue & that people working towards their own goals is a good thing and that issues dealing with COVID have had very little to do with that.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @ajla – individualism in the context of free will, free speech and freedom to reach for your goals/dreams is highly desirable. But that is NOT how it is packaged and sold overtly or subliminally. Success at any cost regardless of collateral effects is how it’s sold.
          Wearing a mask, social distancing etc. has been politicized and sold as a violation of individualism/personal freedom.
          Freedom is only possible if the societal structure you are within is functional and stable.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Success at any cost regardless of collateral effects is how it’s sold.”

            Where are you shopping at?

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        “Rugged individualism” and “Pulling yourself up by your bootstraps” were the teachings of Republican Jesus, aka Ronald Reagan. This has led to a generation or two of rugged individualist who honestly believe their company is constantly looking out for their best interests and of course compensating them as much as their company can. In some sort of schizoid dichotomy they believe they elected a (supposedly) rich guy to stick it to rich guys and guys better educated than them (the deep state). The opposite has occurred, a rich guy helped other rich guys get even richer and the swamp (deep state) is even more fetid. This how we’ve ended up with a sub-set who believe their individual rights supersede any public health doctrines or rules.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          When European Americans settled the west they did it largely communally. The Mormons. The use of wagon trains. Co-ops.

          And the desire by the settlers for their territories to attain state status so that they could have the advantages of government.

          Too many Americans are unaware of the realities of their history.

    • 0 avatar

      If you took all the money Putin spent….GRU surveillance, co-signing the Deutsche Bank Loans to Individual-1, hiring folks to spam Twitter and other platforms with nonsense, servers of bot-farms, a bit of election machine hacking….he hasn’t even made a down payment on one set of fighter jets. The discord he has sown by a lucky break when a minor surveillance target somehow became President is epic. Meanwhile, not a peep out of him about the Bounties paid…not a word. Covid should have been his re election ticket, show some leadership, send a little money around, rally the troops. Instead we get literal jack-boots and illegal police. Amazing.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    This should be stone simple but sadly had turned into a political fight by some. 1. Your dog and cat have to have their shots? Right? Your vet won’t treat them if they don’t and Fido can’t get groomed. Your spawn have to have their immunizations? Right? Oh you can refuse and home school them; thanks for making them potential (likely) disease carriers. Or you can live in a neighborhood of Kookietown and become an anti-vaxxer. There’s a pandemic going on. The pandemic is spread by airborne pathogens. Wearing of masks aids in slowing down the spread of airborne pathogens. This shouldn’t be that hard for the most dimwitted of us to figure out. Not wearing masks and not social distancing only helps the airborne pathogens spread and abates the pandemic. Some can pooh-pooh masks and social distancing. Those measures worked in NY,MD, and VA. Masks in public places should be like vaccines, mandatory. Like vaccines they work. For those muttering “I have muh rights!”, they end at the tip of your nose for public health concerns. See, it’s really stone simple.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Is it just coincidental that among the states having the highest percentages of positive tests are those who comprised the Confederacy and that the states that fought on the side of the Union generally rank among those with the lowest positive rates?

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/health/coronavirus-canada-bars-reopening-1.5652671

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