By on July 1, 2020

North of the border, Wednesday dawned on a country celebrating a significantly less festive, no-touch national holiday. No fireworks and crowds on this COVID-y Canada Day, just locals lighting them off from the roofs of walk-ups in your author’s humble neighborhood. The “crowd” outside the Burger King hasn’t grown or shrunk in size (and remains just as clandestine as before).

This year, however, Americans have good reason to join in the celebration.

This week, Ford announced that the 7.3-liter V8 found in its new-for-2020 Super Duty line will be offered as a standalone product. The brand’s newest crate engine is a throwback that generated many smiles upon its release — boasting iron construction, pushrods, and nary a turbocharger in sight, the engine dubbed “Godzilla” generates 430 horsepower and 475 lb-ft of torque. Output doesn’t change in crate engine guise.

Built at Ford’s Windsor Assembly Plant in Ontario, the 7.3L is a breath of fresh air in an industry where downsizing and forced induction is quickly becoming the norm, and even making major inroads in the full-size pickup space. Certainly at Ford, anyway.

Buyers of the crate engine now offered by Ford Performance will be on the hook for $8,150, with the beefy bundle including a fully assembled engine, ignition coils and wires, oil pan, oil cooler, intake and throttle body, and exhaust manifolds. Apparently, the mill can be tuned up to 600 hp without too much effort.

What you do with it will depend on the size, shape, and surroundings of the engine bays at your disposal, as well as your imagination.

[Images: Ford]

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29 Comments on “From Canada, With Displacement: Ford’s Largest Gas V8 Arrives As a Crate Engine...”


  • avatar
    dwford

    I assume this fits in a Miata

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Price is pretty comparable to the GM crate engines, which is nice.

    I predict a lot of tired Broncos and OBS trucks are going to wake up in a big way.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I was wondering how long before the crate version came out. When it was first released for the trucks, the main complaint about the 7.3 and swaps was the depth of the oil pan, and the oil pump and pickup, and how it would make putting the engine in passenger cars an issue. I wonder if they’ve worked that out, or if the Godzilla will be limited to trucks?

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    That harmonic balancer is massive.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Subaru Justy FTW

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    While responsible automakers around the globe are focused on the production of lifesaving masks in response to the pandemic, Ford workers in Canada fiddle around with this anachronistic monument to fossil fuels…

    Ford – We Hate Mankind®

    Canada – Bid On Our Complicity™

    • 0 avatar
      2manycars

      Shove it, snowflake. It the environazis and communistic “progressives” that hate mankind. Of course you are welcome to wring your hands, sniveling and fretting over the Big Bad Ford V8 while you slink around in your Prius. Meanwhile the adults will be pumping and burning fossil fuels at a prodigious rate while thundering down the asphalt in V8 splendor. And loving it.

    • 0 avatar
      2manycars

      Shove it, snowflake. It is the environazis and communistic “progressives” that hate mankind. Of course you are welcome to wring your hands, sniveling and fretting over the Big Bad Ford V8 while you slink around in your Prius. Meanwhile the adults will be pumping and burning fossil fuels at a prodigious rate while thundering down the asphalt in V8 splendor. And loving it.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      This motor probably has a better total lifecycle environmental impact than an EV vehicle, and would be replacing a much higher polluting vintage engine in whatever car tuners put it in. So this 7.3 is actually GOOD for the environment.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      No automaker in the US has done more in response to the Pandemic than Ford.

      They are making reusable hospital gowns with airbag fabric.

      They have designed and are making face shield, and have shared their design and assembly instructions.

      They designed and are building the PAPR to be distributed by 3M Health care distributors.

      They are working with GE Health care to produce parts for their ventilators as well as assembling them.

      Finally they are making basic masks too.

      What have the other “responsible” automakers done?

      Meanwhile all they have done for this is drag out some old photos from its introduction and are selling it by itself instead of with a truck. Speaking of trucks this engine will do a lot for the public good powering ambulances.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      I heard they tried using the 6-axis mill to make masks, but the fabric kept getting fouled up in the cutters. So they decided to sell something made of metal, just to keep the workers off the unemployment line.

    • 0 avatar
      kjhkjlhkjhkljh kljhjkhjklhkjh

      This engine predates the outbreak .. i feel sorry for you.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      He worked for GM I think, though I’m not sure if it was actually GM or “Motors Liquidation”. Salty

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @toolguy Forgot to add /sarc or an emoji. LOL

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      2manycars, nice response. :-)

      dwford, thoughtful answer, thank you.

      SPPPP, I like it. :-)

      And hat tip to Lou_BC.

      But since we are here [VW and GM figures are from May Car and Driver article; more updated information welcome]:
      • VW: ~1 million masks per month (~33K/day)
      • GM: ~1.5 million masks per month (~49k/day)
      • BYD: ~153 million masks per month (~5 million/day)

      Simplistic conclusion: BYD loves me 100X more than does GM?

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Impressive numbers from GM. Then again, as a taxpayer I like to think we deserve a good chunk of the credit for anything GM does, be it building cars, making masks or paying the pensions of former employees. Don’t know if BYD loves me or not. Do know that they have never come to me hat in hand for a handout.

        Or was it “Old GM” that made the masks. It is so tiring to keep track of but as a taxpayer, we should follow our investments so I do try.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          “Impressive numbers from GM.” Exactly *not* my point. Reading comprehension is not your strong suit, is it?

          If GM produces masks at this rate for 18 years, they can give each person living in the U.S. one mask. Doesn’t exactly sound adequate given the CDC’s recommendation that we all wear masks. (And unclear guidelines on ‘re-use’.)

          3M is bumping up production to 35 million/month in the U.S. (which will be a third of 3M’s global production). That’s one mask per person per month – not exactly a glut.

          Since you’ve explained that anything from China is verboten, I’m just wondering how we close this mask gap.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Because, in spite of automakers not making many masks, I have had no issue obtaining masks. As such, I don’t really and since I’m not using said masks I selected BYD because they have never come to me with their hand out on tax day.

            If I’m going to not use a company’s products, I’d just assume not pay for them.

            If I do need a mask to potentially be a lifesaving device, it isn’t going to come from GM anyway because I want it to work correctly.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            And yet again, more of my posts living in your head. You should charge rent.

  • avatar
    kjhkjlhkjhkljh kljhjkhjklhkjh

    Now what is more fun is this is already been cam’d and a head ported to 600+ hp NA, So when the SVT team gets a hold of this and adds a better crank and connecting rods I can see this in a Raptor-ish truck making a OEM warranty backed downtuned-550hp/600ftlb in stock form.

    For the aftermarket a tiny footprint 650+hp block is going to sell very VERY well.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    It’s nice to see that DOHC / turbo is not really the right answer for trucks.
    And kudos to Ford for finally realizing that.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Find a nice top-loader 6-speed to bolt up behind it, and you might have something.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    This is going right into my ’95 Sable.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I would pay good money to see that combo run at the strip. I’ll pay Bruse Springsteen concert type money to see it if you can get the hood to close. Seriously, I love Frankensteins like that.

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    I need it to replace the replacement 390 in my ‘58 F8 5-yard that replaced some I6 half a century ago.

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