By on May 26, 2020

ford

All the flash with only some of the dash — that basically sums up Ford’s 2020 Edge ST-Line, a midsize CUV that mimics the looks of the sport-focused ST but politely says “no thanks” to a hotter engine.

Orders opened today for the new addition to the oft-overlooked Edge family. It was the strange popularity of the Edge ST, which landed back in 2018, that prompted the minds in the Glass House to copy a trend that’s become all the rage among its import rivals.

Hyundai has N Line, Volkswagen has R-Line, and now Ford has ST-Line.

ford

In the case of the Edge, going the new ST-Line route means the 4,000-pound crossover maintains the model’s stock 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, good for 250 horsepower and 275 lb-ft of torque. Omitted is the well-regarded 2.7-liter turbo V6 (335 hp, 380 lb-ft) found in the ST.

Clearly, the appeal here is to just look like you can put the power down.

By ticking the ST-Line box, Edge buyers line themselves up for all the visual trappings that set the ST apart from its run-of-the-mill brethren. There’s an ST-style grille, body-colored bumpers, a black ST beltline molding with sporty lower cladding, fog lamps and LED lighting, black roof rack side rails, 20-inch gloss black aluminum wheels, and, of course, Edge ST-Line badging to confuse your friends.

“So, this is the hottest one they make, right?” they’ll ask.

“Wrong. Dead wrong,” you’ll hopefully reply (unless you’re on a date).

ford

The appeal for customers is obvious; not everyone wants to shell out for a V6, and not everyone is content to look like they’re driving a rental. For Ford, the appeal comes from a slightly loftier sticker gained from an appearance package cobbled together from an existing trim bin.

Stickering for $38,100 before destination in front-drive guise, the ST-Line sits above the volume SEL ($34,355) and matches the price of the upmarket Titanium. Moving up all the way to the top-slight ST would set a buyer back $43,265, so, if looks are all that matters, the ST-Line can be seen as something of a bargain proposition. TTAC readers might see it another way.

Ford claims that in 2019 and 2020, “nearly 13 percent of all Edge sales have been ST models” — enough of a take rate to break out a whole new trim.

While we haven’t received any confirmation from the boys and girls at the Blue Oval, it seems pretty likely that Ford has a similar treatment for the Explorer in mind.

[Images: Ford]

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23 Comments on “Three Dressed Up As a Nine: Ford Debuts Edge ST-Line...”


  • avatar
    jkross22

    Always liked the ‘new look’ Edge, but that’s waaayyy too much money for one. It’s a cheaply made thing, but they want nearly 40k for one that just looks like it’s not slow.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The sooner this black-wheels trend runs its course, the better.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    $38 large for a FWD model…

    (Shakes head)

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    You’d think it was the 1970s the way the decal based performance packages are proliferating. Better by stock in a weather resistant vinyl decal company.

    “THIS STICKER ADDS 5 HP!”

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    This is nice, but like most Fords 2 year old ones are half the price as new

  • avatar
    Maymar

    Looks like it’s stock Edge suspension as well? So, people would rather the illusion of a performance vehicle rather than buy a normal car that drives slightly better?

    I wish Ford would bring over the Vignale line they use in Europe. If the industry has decided I pretty much have to drive a crossover, I’d rather they go full Brougham. Performance trims are nonsense on crossovers, I’d prefer something Novocained out and feel absolutely nothing.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Ford does, it’s called Lincoln which they don’t sell in Europe

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The Edge ST and a base Nautilus are around the same price, but if you want a Nautilus with a V6 you’re paying at least $10K more than the ST, or $15K more than this fake ST. Add another few thousand bucks for the comfort seats that you really want on a Lincoln (and the option package they require). It’s a different price universe.

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Eh, during Peak Brougham, you could have tuffed velour and padded roofs on models in any division. If a fancier Edge steps on Lincoln’s toes, just push Lincoln a little further.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I believe they did briefly. There was a Fusion Vignale (or whatever they called the trim above Titanium) on the lot when I bought a Ford in 2016. Notable by the quilted-looking material on the dash. Probably dropped because no one wanted to spend $35K on a Fusion.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    ST-Line?

    I see focus groups are not something Ford is investing in anymore. ST-Line is awful. Just awful. Call it sport and be done with it. Yes sport is astoundingly generic but Sanitary Towel-Line absolutely ruins the ST name (as dumb as it is)

    ST should have been SVT. This ain’t Europe. ST is meaningless.

    • 0 avatar
      DexteriousJones

      I dunno, this feels like the exact type of trash a focus group would churn out.
      “Can we get the -looks- of the ST, but not have to pay for the silly engine and harsh suspension?”

  • avatar
    DexteriousJones

    Absolutely detest this.

    What is with auto manufacturers being so willing to water down their performance branding? Either you want the performance model or you don’t. It’s the Syndrome meme; if everything is a performance model, nothing is.

  • avatar
    Johnnyangel

    If your dad was a spendthrift he would have bought luxury cars galore and spent your inheritance for sure. “Skinflint” may have been the word you were looking for.

  • avatar
    gtem

    The Germans have been doing this forever with their AUdi S-Line, etc. Count me as a fan of the Edge, I always enjoy my upper-trim 2.0T rentals. But that much money for some dolled up variant? No thanks. What I’d rather see is the 2.7T as an option in a plainer-wrapper Edge that has some real meat on the wheels for pothole duty.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      You know what I think many of us are missing?

      Back in the day where you could easily get vehicles with large amounts of torque and displacement with a cushy suspension. A 2.7 turbo Edge with the smallest wheels possible and the most sideway would appeal to me.

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