By on April 17, 2020

2019 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e

2019 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e Fast Facts

2.0-liter four-cylinder gas engine combined with electric motor (398 net system horsepower; 296 hp @ 5,500 rpm; 472 lb-ft net torque; 295 lb-ft 1,500-4,000 rpm)

Eight-speed automatic transmission, permanent four-wheel drive

N/A city / N/A highway / 42MPGe combined/19 combined (EPA Estimated Rating, MPG)

N/A (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $79,000 (U.S) / N/A (Canada)

As Tested: $93,200 (U.S.) / N/A (Canada)

Prices include $1,295 destination charge in the United States. The Range Rover Sport HSE P400e was not available in Canada for the 2019 model year. It is, however, available as a 2020.

Even Range Rovers need to go green.

Or, at the very least, offer “green” engine options to accrue cred with the right kind of well-heeled buyers.

While I believe some of the greenies with plenty of green in their bank account are sincere about their intentions to save the planet (and I definitely believe the climate is changing, and we’re at fault), other green types are simply signaling virtue. Still others think they’re doing the right thing, without considering that not all hybrids are the same.

Some hybrids aren’t even meant to maximize fuel economy – their electrified hardware strives mainly for enhanced performance.

Enter the 2019 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e (Land Rover insists on the “Land Rover Range Rover” naming convention, and now that we’ve got the SEO-friendly text out of the way, we’ll be dropping that). The performance numbers are solid. The MPGe number isn’t terrible. But 19 mpg in gas-only mode? That’s not great. The electric-only mileage range is up to 19 miles, and if the battery is drained, you’re likely to see numbers closer to that 19 mpg figure. Other reviewers who measure fuel economy certainly did.

The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder gas engine makes 296 horsepower, while the electric-motor it pairs with puts out 114 horsepower. Total system power is 398 horsepower and 472 lb-ft of torque. Yes, I know the hp numbers don’t add up correctly – that’s usually the case with hybrid systems.

2019 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e

All-wheel drive gets the power to optional 21-inch wheels via an eight-speed automatic transmission, and an electric air suspension with adaptive damping underpins it all. That all-wheel-drive system has an electronic differential that can torque vector via braking.

Land Rover/Range Rover would love to tell you all about the plug-in hybrid’s trickery and wizardry and how that makes this heavy SUV better at saving the planet than a similar-sized, petrol-only luxury barge, but while there is cool green tech on hand, that tech takes a backseat to performance when you’re behind the wheel.

[Get new and used Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e pricing here!]

2019 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e

About that wizardry: Here are a few examples of what Range Rover has cooked up. One neat trick is that if you’re using the nav system to guide you, it will take traffic, environment, and other factors into account to operate the hybrid system in the most efficient manner.

Trick number two: You get regen not just when braking, but also when coasting.

Trick number three: When in Sport mode, the system sends extra charge to the battery, so that the electric motor can be used to boost performance.

Trick number four: A Save mode holds battery charge so it can be used later.

Full EV mode can be activated via a button, if the driver so chooses.

All of this goes unnoticed, unless you’re paying close attention. Mostly, the Range Rover Sport P400e drives like any other Range Rover Sport – accelerates relatively quickly for a heavy luxo SUV, has steering that feels sporty enough, and rides like a luxury vehicle.

2019 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e

Inside, the P400e has the dual-screen center stack that a lot of JLR models are rocking these days, and it looks good and works well. Same goes for the capacitive-touch steering-wheel controls. The interior looks and feels as luxurious as you’d expect at this price point. That said, I cringe at the thought of any of those things needing repair once the warranty ends. That’s not a shot at JLR’s less-than-stellar reputation for reliability – well, not entirely – but even if the brand had a rep for being bulletproof, I’d still be concerned. Even the most reliable brands aren’t perfect.

Outside, you get the usual Rover box-it-came-in shape, with a sloping, angular nose giving the look a bit more aggression.

Standard features include blind-spot monitoring, traffic-sign recognition, adaptive speed limiter, driver-condition monitoring, rear-cross traffic monitoring, clear-exit monitoring, LED headlights and DRLs, power liftgate, panoramic sunroof, rain-sensing wipers, leather seats, heated front seats, dual-zone climate control, power tilt/telescope steering wheel, keyless entry and starting, premium audio, 10-inch touchscreen, navigation, satellite radio, USB, Bluetooth, ambient interior lights, Wi-Fi hotspot, and an interactive gauge display.

The options list is where things get insane, as they often do with high-dollar luxury imports. Let’s start with the $4,000 Driver Assist Pack, which includes blind-spot assist, 360-degree camera, adaptive cruise control with steering assist, high-speed emergency braking, lane-keep assist, and park assist. Similar features are available for less money, or even standard, on some mainstream vehicles.

A Climate Comfort Pack includes heated steering wheel, four-zone climate control, sliding panoramic roof, and a refrigerated compartment in the console for $1,385. The $1,635 Vision Assist Pack includes automatic high-beam assist, configuration options for the ambient interior lighting, and head-up display. Add $355 for headliner there, and $665 for a black roof here, and a pinch of $355 black veneer, plus a dash of $610 soft door-close, with another $710 for the red paint, and $100 for cabin air ionization, and 21-inch wheels at $1,835, plus $1,120 to heat AND cool the front (and rear) seats, and top it all off with a $135 110-volt socket, and you have a recipe for an SUV that crossed the $90K mark.

2019 Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e

It’s one thing to be judicious with the option box. The real question is – does your lifestyle make sense for a PHEV that costs several grand more than gas-powered versions? Are the potential fuel savings worth it? Will you drive the vehicle in such a manner that you’ll actually save on petrol? That’s what one of the buff books asked – and I think that’s a very good question.

Of course, the math is just part of the equation. For some, it will be about the cool factor. Others will love to feel green even if they’re burning deceased dinosaurs most of the time.

You don’t need to sacrifice luxury or performance for this plug-in hybrid. But you will need to lay out extra cash up front.

Whether that’s worth it to you is your choice.

[Images © 2020 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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54 Comments on “2019 Range Rover Sport HSE P400e Review – Green Cred Will Cost You...”


  • avatar
    R Henry

    “I definitely believe the climate is changing, and we’re at fault”

    Oh gawd…puleeez don’t bring yet more politics here.

    I surf here to avoid the venomous politics that pervade our culture, and I really want to enjoy my automotive hobby as an escape from politics…

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      +1 It’s getting pretty hard to find sites that aren’t all politics all the time

    • 0 avatar
      fourthreezee

      Amen to that R. Henry!
      This practically a re-written press release from LR. And isn’t it curious how all of these failing newspapers and websites don’t realize that they alienate at least half of their potential readers when they inject their leftist politics into their Own articles and reviews. You’d think they actually cared about their balance sheets…
      On the bright side I now know never to read any of Tim Healy’s articles again.
      Oh how I long for the good ole’ Farago days when TTAC’s reviews were actually relevant and hard-edged. Back when the reviews were honest & the word ‘Truth’ in TTAC actually meant something. Political commentary was strictly off limits in the content.
      And what’s with all these Canadians Writers anyway? You’d think they actually had money to purchase a luxury vehicle after they get finished paying all those taxes.
      Meh-

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Yeah, and thanks for keeping that little political rant to yourself

      • 0 avatar
        Tim Healey

        Last I checked, I’ve lived my entire life in America. :)

        • 0 avatar
          fourthreezee

          So that’s true in your case – but my point remains about the Canadian car reviewers here and their “viewpoints”. I didn’t empirically state that all the reviews were written by Canadians on this site. Once again: reading comprehension.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            What does being Canadian have to do with anything? Are you one of those blowhards who think you’re somehow special or better than everyone else just because you mother happened to be standing on a particular patch of land when you crawled out?

            People who take immense pride in something they had absolutely nothing to do with amaze me.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      I hardly think acknowledging what all but a handful of scientists believe is a factual truth is political.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that ‘my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”
        ― Issac Asimov

        Nowhere was this more evident than this past Wednesday when that pack of fat f**ks and scrawny wimps gathered in Lansing to show off their tacticool wardrobes and try to look tough.

        • 0 avatar
          fourthreezee

          See my comment below re: fellow Americans Think carefully about disparaging good folks who happen to see their country through an originalist lens.

          We all come here because we like cars after all.

        • 0 avatar
          fourthreezee

          See my comment below re: fellow Americans Think carefully about disparaging good folks who happen to see their country through an originalist lens.

          We all come here because we like cars after all.

        • 0 avatar
          OverHypedVirusVSTheB&B

          When you’re a little baby b!#ch incel, things like standing up for your natural rights are scary(for you), and sometimes make you little envious because unlike yourself, they are acting rather than spewing constant diarrhea out of their mouth while sitting behind a monitor. I know its hard for you to understand so hey, KB warrior, you keep showing exactly what kind of REEEEE baby you are while the adults, adult.

      • 0 avatar
        fourthreezee

        All based on Easily manipulated data being used in “scientific models Mr. Healy. And we are seeing in real time how well that’s worked out for us… Or have you missed that?

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          Thank you for proving my point. “I don’t care how much data they have or how long they’ve studied it, since I don’t understand it and found someone on the internet who disagrees with them then they must be wrong,”

          Unfortunately too many people think “it doesn’t make sense to me” is “it’s not true,” and we don’t do enough to shut those people up.

          • 0 avatar
            fourthreezee

            Ahhh -But I am very well educated and well read. Additionally- You seem to have deliberately skipped my very point about models and their inherent flaws. ‘Millions should be dead by now and we need to shut down our economy don’t you know.’
            More importantly we see your mask starting to slip exposing your authoritarian nature. Be advised fellow ‘internet person’ …As much as you and your ilk might like to ‘shut us up’, millions of your fellow Americans including veterans like myself take ‘all’ of our constitutional rights seriously- especially the 1st and 2nd.

            Your move.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            yeah, well, when people like you cite the First Amendment while whining about not being able to go out on your boat, I question how “well read” you actually are.

            (by the way, citing the First Amendment as “support” for your argument” is kind of the ultimate concession. You’re basically admitting the only thing your argument has going for it is that it’s not illegal to express.)

          • 0 avatar
            fourthreezee

            Hmmm…
            Ever notice how the same people that call their weird weather religion ‘peer-reviewed and ‘settled science’ so STFU:

            – Act like Bill Nye is a real scientist
            – Pretend Al Gore was a credible voice for climate change
            – Act like Bill Gates is a doctor
            – Say an autistic Scandinavian 16 yr old girl Is a ‘Climate Expert’
            – Claim everything will be fine if you give the government more money and give the Leftists more power

            Weird

    • 0 avatar

      This is called Chicken Little Syndrome (The sky is falling!). But COVID-19 solves all worries regarding climate change, it shuts down economy and creates the new normal. And the New Normal is the permanent state of economic depression. No human activity is allowed, period.

      • 0 avatar
        fourthreezee

        When you look the loudest voices Shrieking: “lockdown indefinitely” “we have to get this under control” etc. And then line them up with their beliefs in their weird weather religion and the ‘models‘ they used to justify it… There is an interesting symmetry.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Look, go to work, go to church, go to a Trump rally, WHO CARES?… Just stay away from me and others who are trying to protect themselves

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @fourthreezee: A ‘ very well educated’ person would understand the importance of peer reviewed scientific evidence. And the benefits of following the advice of those with specialized degrees and education in the applicable fields.

          That is why such research is peer reviewed and includes relevant footnotes and references.

          All of which you are obviously discounting. In favour of those who claim to inherently ‘understand’ such things or have ‘gut’ feelings.

          And a ‘well read’ person would have no trouble discovering that TTAC is Canadian owned.

    • 0 avatar
      randyinrocklin

      No shit Sherlock. I thought this was a car guy site. I really don’t want to hear from climate change idiots, or the emissions gestapo or the Feds getting involved with OUR cars. Car guys wanna talk about cars. Screw the leftists, they always ruin it for everybody.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      “Oh gawd…puleeez don’t bring yet more politics here.”

      You must be new here.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    This is a lot of money for a pretty underwhelming car :(

  • avatar
    RHD

    “Go Green!” is a half-witted slogan used to persuade office workers to recycle their paper waste, instead of putting it in the trash can.
    There’s nothing really “green” about spending $79,000 plus tax and registration on an SUV, except the money involved.
    Imagine spending $79,000 on planting trees in your town, or reforesting a clear-cut. That would make a real difference.
    Hybrids are an attempt to get more net miles and horsepower out of a gallon of petrol, with less CO2 emissions per mile. Other than that, “green” is all-too-often just a cynical marketing word. Those who actually care about our planet aren’t out shopping for Range Rovers.

  • avatar
    redapple

    If you are green, why are you buying 6000 pound car?

    If you have the $ to buy a Range Rover, why on earth would you worry about saving gas?

    ZERO LOGICAL BUYERS !

    • 0 avatar
      fourthreezee

      Two words: Virtue. Signaling.

      I am currently shopping in this price point and am looking closely at a Land Cruiser ( 1^ 30 more reliable, just as roomy + fantastic resale) or a 4WD Sequoia (Roomier Less expensive & 1^10 more reliable + fantastic resale).
      But different strokes as they say.

      The Jag/LR sales/svc. guys gotta eat too.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Every review of one of these European PHEVs with very short electric range and small electric motors needs to remind the reader that these are made to allow people to circumvent congestion charges and ICE-free zones in European cities. They don’t make all that much sense in the USA at this point. The electric range is not long enough that gas savings will make up the cost for most US drivers, and they don’t particularly improve the driving experience in the way that BEVs or more electric-centered PHEVs do.

    The right PHEV for the American market is one that has a stronger electric motor, so that it can accelerate normally onto a freeway in electric mode, and that has at least 30 miles or so of electric range. Unsurprisingly, that describes the few PHEVs from U.S. makers pretty well.

    • 0 avatar
      fourthreezee

      Bingo

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Actually, what I think is the best hybrid system is European. It’s the Koenigsegg KDD system. It uses electric motors to replace the transmission and lower gears to get the car moving. Then, it’s driven by a direct drive ICE. It basically combines the best of both technologies. The downside is that it’s priced so that only actual rich people can afford it. The upside is sub 2 second 0-60 times. For better or worse, that’s my attraction to electric driven cars. Acceleration. That’s my thing and why I’m looking at a new BEV. Not everyone interested in electric motors driving the wheels of their car is doing it for green cred.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Trick #1 some Toyotas will do that and Fords use the GPS even if you don’t have Navigation.

    Trick #2 all hybrids regen when coasting.

    Trick #4 pretty common for a PHEV to have a EV later, EV now and Auto mode.

    My ancient lowly Ford PHEV does all 3 of those.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    Green cred? When will autojournos give up this tired, old trope?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Probably never.

      It only reinforces the convenient stereotypes that they and others have about hybrid/EV buyers, made worse in class envy stories about expensive vehicles.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    This is lazy phone-it-in garbage. NOWHERE in the article does it say he *actually drove it*; it reads like a repackage of advertising content mixed in with a quick skim of other reviews. Top it off with a link to a build-your-own site just like sponsored articles do.

    TTAC has really deteriorated. What a shame.

  • avatar
    NoID

    “That all-wheel-drive system has an electronic differential that can torque vector via braking.”

    Y’all either need to hit the books or get a dang technical editor, because not only is that statement technically ridiculous, I don’t really know where to aim my ridicule (besides the author) because I can’t tell where you’re claiming torque is vectored. Is that the front, rear, or center differential you’re talking about, and how does it apply brake torque?

    I’ll give you a hint: None of the differentials do anything of the sort.

    I’d volunteer to be your technical Jiminy Cricket, but I’d break The TTAC Code of Stuff We Kinda Sorta Believe In, because I work in the industry and am therefore Supremely Biased. I’d probably need a handy nom de guerre to maintain my secret identity as well, but I can’t think of good one off the top of my head.

    • 0 avatar
      fourthreezee

      ‘Truth-telling techie’?

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      @ NoID – I don’t disagree. Such are the dangers of a having a content farmer who doesn’t want to copy-and-paste directly from Land Rover press info* but who also lacks the technical understanding to restate things correctly in his own words. Cue rant about the death of expertise and so forth. Unlike you, I don’t work in the industry and I don’t have any sort of engineering background. Nonetheless, this isn’t the first time I’ve read something on TTAC and thought, “Yeah, this guy doesn’t really have a handle on this.” Apologies if that sounds harsh, but I presume the writers are paid for their efforts even if I’m not paying for the product.

      – – –
      *From http://www.landroverusa.com/vehicles/range-rover-sport/technology.html: “The Torque Vectoring by Braking system delivers responsive, controlled cornering and handling through even the tightest of corners. The vehicle’s electronic differential and braking systems constantly balance the distribution of engine torque between the four wheels when cornering.”

  • avatar
    dreadsword

    … where’s the review?
    This is a nice description of some of the features and options, but there’s no actual review content here. Perhaps it should be titled “Details” or “Review Teaser” or something?

  • avatar
    EGSE

    Nothing says “lot poison” like pushing a 2019 car in 2020. Better take an axe to that “MSRP”.

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    Two years ago I was invited to a Range Rover event at the Odeonsplatz where I had the chance to drive a 2018 Range Rover P400e. This SUV was powered by a 2.0 turbocharged four cylinder gasoline engine mated to an electric engine. I thought it would be slow, but to my astonishment it was rather agile and quick. It did not feel underpowered at all, and the four cylinder engine had excellent NVH characteristics. The propulsion change from electric to internal combustion and vice versa was also very smooth.

    But due to the already hefty weight of the SUV body and the added weight of the batteries, I do not believe this SUV will provide impressive fuel economy benefits at all. The electric mode is intended for short distance city driving.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    19 miles is not to be sniffed at if that range works for a daily commute. If you the. Use these type of cars for a lot of weekend motorway driving it actually does make a lot of sense. So for some people this works well

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Depreciation on these is horrifying, that’s the worst part.

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