By on March 28, 2020

North American International Auto Show organizers broke with tradition this year by moving the premier trade event, for decades held in January, to a more pleasant and marketable June date. Now they’ve broken with tradition again — by scrapping the thing altogether.

The reason behind it is so glaringly obvious it hardly needs to be stated, but the specific, logistical reason is even more grim: the show’s venue, Detroit’s TCF Center (née Cobo Center), is turning into a field hospital.

Following unconfirmed reports on social media, word became fact this evening. The Detroit auto show is postponed until June of 2021, as the riverfront convention center, like that of the scuppered New York International Auto Show, is going offline for at least six months.

As reported by the Detroit Free Press, the show’s organizers — The Detroit Auto Dealers Association — issued a memo Saturday, stating, “The health and welfare of the citizens of Detroit and Michigan is paramount. TCF Center is the ideal location for this important function at this critical and unprecedented time.”

Like New York City’s Jacob K. Javits Center, TCF/Cobo has been tapped by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to transform into an overflow hospital for the area’s patients. The measure is necessary to handle an anticipated influx of coronavirus patients that would otherwise overwhelm the region’s existing medical facilities.

The NYC hospital came together in a hurry. One of four planned for the area, it boasts 1,000 beds and is expected to open this coming week:

Depressingly, the New York auto show would have opened to media on April 8th. As the fast-moving pandemic gained hold in North America, organizers decided in early March to push back the event to August 28th.

Originally scheduled for June 7th to 20th, the Detroit show will not spring into fall, but instead go ahead exactly a year from its planned summertime inaugural. As participant interest waned in the digital age and the realities of holding a prestige trade show in Detroit in January became ever clearer, organizers decided to move the event to a more favorable time. Under the new plan, the city’s refurbished downtown would play host to auto show-related events outside the main venue hall, potentially increasing the show’s draw.

So, mark your calendar for June 11th, 2021, when the next NAIAS gets underway with Motor Bella — a four-day street fair featuring British and Italian vehicles and food. Press days come along on June 15th, with the show opening to the public on the 19th.

In the meantime, good luck.

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59 Comments on “Scratch Detroit in June From Your Calendar – the Show’s Off...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    None of this is a surprise, let’s hope the 2021 date is a go

  • avatar
    dwford

    Now would be a great time for these automakers to get into social media. We are all home and bored. How about some live streams of prototype testing. Or some surprise early product reveals. Give us something

  • avatar
    JimZ

    why are they doing that? this virus isn’t even as bad as the normal flu! here, this obscure right-wing blog staffed by loonbats says so!

    • 0 avatar
      Lokki

      Give your politics a rest there JimZ

      Obscure right right-wing blogs like The Hill?

      https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/longevity/480089-coronavirus-sparks-panic-as-flu-poses-greater-threat-to

      Or Axios?

      https://www.axios.com/coronavirus-influenza-disease-china-united-states-64311582-2031-40af-8ec3-9ff68341d4f3.html

      Or US News and World Report?

      https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2020-02-07/theres-a-virus-spreading-in-us-thats-killed-10-000-the-flu

      Or that hard core Right Wing Mother Jones?

      (Who finally updated the article…. 26 March…)

      https://www.motherjones.com/environment/2020/01/get-your-flu-shot/

      Now let’s talk about cars instead

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Lokki, have you told the other guy to give it a rest as well, the one who has to derail every thread on how we’re overreactin, providing questionable sources as “proof?” Does it need to be said that converting convention centres to field hospitals is not required to manage a normal flu?

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          If you believe that we should commit economic suicide in order to try to prevent the healthy population from contracting this virus, just say so. I will accept your opinion. If you just don’t like the fact that people die during a viral outbreak, I agree with you. If you think the death toll from corona is worse than what happened during the Depression, I disagree with you.
          Economic activity funds everything. The rest is just prayer. Kill the economy and you kill everything.

          I have lost this argument with you, and with most, so let it burn. We won’t pay the bill anyway. Our children will. All because we lost our nerve and ran and hid, instead of getting up and going to work. Our reaction is not wise, and it is not brave, it is hysterical, and shameful.

          First people demand links, and then, when they are provided, don’t read them because they are not from sources within the bubble.

          There is no such thing as thread derailing. The media is obsessed with Armageddon reporting, and the panic has set in. I’m providing a rare contrary opinion, and it is driving some people insane.

          I’m not sorry. People should be permitted to express an opinion that differs from the mainstream. Here is mine: stopping the transmission of this virus among the healthy population is not worth destroying our economy.
          New evidence of this comes in every day.

          Check out what has been discovered in the tiny nation of Iceland. This is not the Plague. We do not need to destroy ourselves in order to save ourselves. We should focus all of our resources on the old and vulnerable, and get up and go to work, so we can pay for….everything.

          If you do not like this opinion, perhaps you can simply ignore it. It is not for you. Huddle in fear and watch your TV. It will feed your need to feel terror.

          If you want a different perspective, you are going to have to leave your emotions behind, leave the safety of the mob, and look at the evidence.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Oh, for Christ’s sake, thelaine, go to f*cking work if you want and stop by a crowded airport on your way. Who cares?

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “People should be permitted to express an opinion that differs from the mainstream.”

            I know TV has taught us that the “lone wolf” with the “dissenting opinion” is always right, but that’s not reality. Some things are not a matter of opinion. And some “opinions” are just flat out wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @theLaine, you keep ignoring the key issue, the mathematical reality that without measures to reduce transmission being invoked that this virus can overwhelm the existing healthcare systems.

            Mortality rates are not the primary concern, infection rates and hospitalization rates are.

            Generally healthcare facilities in North America run at 95% of capacity.

            This virus has a long (14+ day latency)
            This virus is more easily transmittable than most other viruses.
            This virus is viable for an extended period on surfaces.
            Humans have not yet built an immunity to this virus, there is no vaccine for it and no medical ‘cure’ for it.
            According to figures released last night for Canada 7% of those infected require hospitalization. 3% require critical care. Just over 40% of those now hospitalized by it, are under the age of 45.

            Therefore if left ‘unchecked’ the numbers requiring hospitalization and critical care will overwhelm the existing medical facilities.

            Therefore those suffering from heart attack, strokes, asthma attacks, motor vehicle accidents,workplace injuries or requiring cancer care will have their care delayed, perhaps resulting in their deaths.

            Flattening the curve over the next 3 weeks, should prevent this from occurring.

            As an aside, in Ontario since emergency measures have been invoked, violent crime and motor vehicle accidents have been significantly reduced.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Some of us never left work. I mean eventually they will need some tax revenue to pay for all this so you are welcome I guess.

        • 0 avatar
          Lokki

          You give it a rest too.

          I’m done here. TTAC is beginning to seem like Bertel has crept back in.

          Too much politics and not enough cars.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            All so that we don’t get infected with a virus that:

            !. Does not generally kill healthy people
            2. Gives half of healthy infected people a cold or “the flu”
            3. Gives the other half of healthy infected people no symptoms at all
            4. Kills old people (starting at 60, your risk goes up as your age goes up. things get ugly at 75 and over, just like with….wait for it…the flu) and those with compromised immune or respiratory function.

            So, instead of helping at risk groups who choose to self-isolate, we slam the brakes on our economy, throw our people out of work, and come crawling to the government for a handout, while they furiously print funny money.

            All this for a virus that has killed fewer people across the world than the flu has killed in the USA.

            You have to decide one way or another. What should be done? A targeted approach, in my opinion, is better than a shutdown, given the evidence, which has existed for weeks, that this is not the plague, it is the equivalent of a flu virus in its behavior.

            Or should we base our policy decisions on our emotions?

            After all, the more we suffer, the more it means we really care.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @Lokki, Well there are not too many car shows, new models or manufacturer sponsored jaunts to comment on.

            And Top Gear (the classic version) was the world’s #1 show not because it was about cars, but because it was not about cars. It was about 3 blokes having fun. With prodigious amounts of political commentary thrown in.

            Traditional ‘car’ shows generally have low viewership. Hence Clarkson’s eureka moment after original Top Gear was cancelled to create a show about other things, but that included cars.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            Pretty much proving his point by going on a burn the witch tirade. thelaine is right, and this hysteria is not going to look good in a year, when everyone still feels the after affects, but has forgotten about the virus. Happy economic collapse to you all.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            LOL, MBella…you’re talking about how “hysterical” everyone is who is taking this seriously, then you end with something about “economic collapse.”

            Fact: the economy has been hurt but it has NOT collapsed. Perhaps you should take your own advice and not be hysterical.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            DON’T LET THE DOOR HIT YOU ON THE @SS ON THE WAY OUT.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Why does he have to @Maymar…How about YOU give it a rest.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryannosaurus

      I understand all of your arguments with thelaine and how you want to minimize sickness/deaths from this outbreak. I think thelaine is talking about the economy and how much fighting this pandemic is costing us.

      I just met up with our local septic service provider and he said that his work has dropped off by 50%. They have had to layoff half of their staff. I find it alarming that people are choosing to cancel the poop service, you would think this is a critical job. Meanwhile my county has tested 400 people and had 18 positive tests, all came in from traveling out of the area (but we will see community spread soon).

      So my question to all of you, how much money/suffering should we do per saved life? Clearly it is not zero dollars or 1 trillion dollars, so what is it? Where do we stop and say we have done enough?

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        @Ryannosaurus, I can tell you 100 percent that the value the Government places on my life is somewhere between zero and the cost of a Blackhawk Helicopter as we were told on several occasions to ground evac casualties. The “You can’t put a price on human lives crowd” is fooling themselves. Not only that but that is why we pay those morons in government what we do. Anyone can make the easy decision (Every life is worth any cost would be the easy decision), but we have leaders to make the hard ones. Or at least we are supposed to.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @Art; If for example an auto manufacturer was to make such a calculation, for example extending the connection to a gas tank and people were to die because of it, would you have the same attitude?

          When someone enlist it is understood that they may be asked to put their life on the line.

          The same is not required of those at home.

          As for the economy, as previously posted, we have historically closed economic activity for 5 day Easter Weekends, from December 23rd to January 2nd, on Sundays and often for 2 weeks in August. And none had lasting negative economic impacts.

  • avatar
    jrhmobile

    I’m afraid that the NAIAS may well be dead. Like Graveyard Dead.

    It’s been a year and a half since the last one. And while DADA blamed the dismal January weather for the steady drop-off of manufacturers introducing new cars — or Hell, even exhibiting any cars at the show — that didn’t seem to slow the Chicago show a few cold weeks later in Chicago.

    The Big 2½ are going to have to step it up big time to prop up NAIAS or it’s going to be nothing more than a quaint memory like Howard Johnson’s.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Go ahead and flame me if you wish, but in my opinion, we’re plunging the economy into what will become a depression over a flu that will turn out to be no worse, or only minimally worse, than a seasonal flu.

    -Just another idiot with a keyboard and an internet connection.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      ” a flu that will turn out to be no worse, or only minimally worse, than a seasonal flu.”

      Show me a point in history where Italy was losing 700 to 900 people a day to the seasonal flu.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      too bad infectious diseases don’t give a wet slap about your opinion.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      here’s a tidbit of info:

      Swine flu
      April 15, 2009 — first infection detected
      June 19, 2009 — 21,449 cases, 87 deaths

      Covid-19
      Jan. 20, 2020 — first infection detected
      March 25, 2020 — 69,344 cases, 1,050 deaths

      https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/03/27/those-covid-19-death-toll-figures-are-incomplete/

      Three months in, COVID-19 has killed over 10x as many people as H1N1 at the same point in the respective outbreaks, despite infecting only a bit over 3x as many people.

      and if you don’t like the Post, they do link their sources.

      the data is not in your favor. Ignoring it won’t make it go away.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Dr. Fauci has now written,

      “If one assumes that the number of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic cases is several times as high as the number of reported cases, the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968), rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36% respectively.”

      Dr. Birx, the White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator, said this week as well that our experience is not matching the models:

      “The predictions of the models don’t match the reality on the ground in either China, South Korea or Italy. We’re about five times the size of Italy, and if you did those divisions, Italy should have close to 400 thousand deaths. They’re not close to achieving that.”

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Death rates are tied to the health care system response. Wuhan province and Italy have seen extremely high death rates because their health systems could not cope with the numbers of sick people. British Columbia where I live has had very low death rates due to the health system’s ability to stay on top of illnesses. “We” are even placing patients on ventilator support earlier than other jurisdictions because outcomes are better. You can’t do that in a maxed out system.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Yeah, right…

        “Sunday, March 29

        NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus outbreak could kill 100,000 to 200,000 Americans, the U.S. government’s top infectious-disease expert warned on Sunday as smoldering hotspots in nursing homes and a growing list of stricken cities heightened the sense of dread across the country.

        Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, made the dire prediction of fatalities on CNN’s “State of the Union,” adding that millions in the U.S. could become infected.”

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “(similar to those in 1957 and 1968)”
          “The coronavirus outbreak could kill 100,000 to 200,000 Americans”

          FWIW, those statements are largely consistent.

          cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/1957-1958-pandemic.html

          cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/1968-pandemic.html

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        > Dr. Fauci has now written,

        Dr. Fauci is now predicting between 100k and 200k deaths. That’s many times worse than the death toll from guns in America, and a large number of both kinds of deaths are preventable, if we as a nation step up and deal with the problem like responsible adults.

        Link to Fauci’s statement:
        https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-usa/trump-backs-off-plan-to-reopen-businesses-by-mid-april-amid-coronavirus-warnings-idUSKBN21G0ME

        As a bonus, Fauci also talked Trump into acting like a responsible adult for a short time today. We can save a lot of lives this way.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Early Models: Flaws and Shortcomings

    Neil Ferguson at Imperial College was the lead author of the first study, which predicted a high mortality rate. He warned that the UK could suffer 500,000 deaths and the U.S. 2.2 million from Wuhan and fanned fears it would overwhelm ICU capacity. This week he said the virus was more quickly transmitted than his first calculations, that the denominator (the number of those who already had it) was far larger and the number seriously affected lower (therefore, less dangerous). He originally indicated the UK would need an 18-month quarantine. This week he says the epidemic there will peak in a couple of weeks.

    His original model, often exaggerated by the media here with a push from certain Democratic activists, ignored community testing and contact tracing because when it was done, insufficient tests were available. (They are more available here now and as of the end of this week over a half million tests have been conducted in the U.S.)

    The Imperial study was heavily relied upon in shaping our own strategies to deal with the epidemic. Oxford released a different model, which indicates up to half the UK population could already have been infected, and that model “assumes that most people who contract the virus don’t show symptoms and very few need to go to the hospital.”

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    @thelaine:
    “assumes that most people who contract the virus don’t show symptoms and very few need to go to the hospital.”
    British Columbia data shows 14% of our COVID-19 cases require hospitalization with an average stay of 14 days. 19% require a critical care stay averaging 10 days. Of that 19% in critical care, 80% will need mechanical ventilation. We are placing people on mechanical ventilation early because we’ve found it improves survival rates. Our health care system can handle hospitalizations on a Wuhan Province scale.
    People under 40 years of age account for 33% of cases.

    These numbers are due to a cohesive plan of suppression and treatment. Our head Public Health Officer believes that over the next 5 days new cases should drop and the curve should start to flatten. We’ve seen our new case rate drop to 10% per day already.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    The President has hinted that he is considering a county-by-county response to minimizing the virus’s spread. In most of the country outside of New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Washington State, the amount of transmission remains small. There seems little sound basis for a countrywide lockdown as better data becomes available. Yes, special protection must still be in place for the elderly and immune suppressed, and we must continue to practice good hygiene, and yes, all available personnel and supplies must go to those areas hardest hit, but I’m not shoving my Amazon boxes into the autoclave any longer and I firmly believe we need to get back to more normal commercial activity in most of the country as soon as possible, and no later than Easter, or the consequences to the nation’s health and well-being will be worse than that of the virus.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The President of the United States of America is not currently a credible source of information or analysis on COVID-19.

      I can explain why this is, but you’ve heard it all already and you don’t care.

      Please use credible sources in the future.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        You are right Luke. But thank God we have internet $#1theads and cheesed1cks to set the record straight.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        And to be clear, by “Internet $#!theads and Cheesed1cks”, I really mean blowhards like you!

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @Art: Just review the clips of the number of times the POTUS has made statements that were totally untrue, or contradicted by experts or that he denied making.

          Leadership is not what he is showing. What we are watching is a carnival snake oil salesman.

          Meanwhile in Ontario our Premier who ran on a similar platform to the POTUS, has invoked emergency measures, follows the recommendations of public health officials, has publicly stated that he and the Prime Minister are on the same team despite their representing different political parties, has introduced legislation against price gouging, and today without any publicity or media announcement personally drove his pick-up truck to a facility to load 30,000 masks and deliver them to a hospital. This was only revealed afterwards when some workers posted pictures.

          Even the media who were against him are now praising how he is handling things.

          That is the difference between someone who has become a leader and someone who remains a buffoon.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    “Please, for the reassurance of people around the world,” Birx begged the reporters at Thursday’s press briefing, stop “talking about creating DNR situations, Do Not Resuscitate situations for patients. There is no situation in the United States right now that warrants that kind of discussion.”

    There is no evidence, Birx continued, that when Americans “need a hospital bed it’s not going to be there or a ventilator, it’s not going to be there.” To the contrary, “we are reassured in meeting with our colleagues in New York that there are still I.C.U. beds remaining and still significant—over 1,000 or 2,000 ventilators that have not been utilized.”

    Birx’s plea followed a Washington Post story headlined “Hospitals Consider Universal Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders for Coronavirus.”

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Please search for other outlets to shotgun post coronavirus quotes and information. It is unnecessary here.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Oh look. People have been posting various Tomfnckery for weeks now aaaaand…silence. But now people get upset.

        These are the only clicks this site is generating now so I am sure I’ll get banned long before any of the virus fnckhead brigade that ruins everyfncking article.

        All of you can piss off

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Oh look. People have been posting various Tomfnckery for weeks now aaaaand…silence. But now people get upset.

        These are the only clicks this site is generating now so I am sure I’ll get banned long before any of the virus fnckhead brigade that ruins everyfncking article.

        All of you can shove it

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Don’t let this distract you from the the fact that in 1966, Al Bundy scored four touchdowns in a single game while playing for the Polk High School Panthers in the 1966 city championship game versus Andrew Johnson High School, including the game-winning touchdown in the final seconds against his old nemesis, Bubba “Spare Tire” Dixon.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    guys, from now on just let thelaine spew his s**t and ignore him. His mind was made up months ago.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    @thelaine:

    You keep using the term ‘healthy people’, but that is a misnomer.

    ‘Healthy people’ are carriers, and ‘healthy people’ are dying. In normal pandemics, the virus is not cloaked like this, and that is where the danger lies.

    Or do you not believe these things? Will you change your tune after 50k people are dead, or a half million?

    And what specific role are you playing in keeping the economy afloat, since that is your primary concern? I hope you’re setting the example by mixing it up with lots of healthy people in the workplace.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      He will “change his tune” when it directly effects him, right now it’s far away and people he doesn’t know are dying. When it’s in his town and someone he cares about dies then his tune will be, “WHY ISN’T ANYONE DURING SOMETHING ABOUT THIS?” You’ll see guys like him are so predictable

      • 0 avatar
        EGSE

        @Lie2me

        Yup. Maryland is on lockdown as of 8 p.m. Only permitted activities are to get food, get medication, obtain health care services or going to/from an essential job.

        Penalty for violation is up to 1 year and max $5000.

        Maryland has medical marijuana prescribed by a physician and sold by licensed dispensaries. There’s one about 4 or 5 miles from me and it usually has a fair number of cars in the lot. When the viral SHTF they went drive-through only. About a week ago I drove by and the lot was 100% filled with waiting cars and it stretched onto the state road and went on….and on…and on for hundreds of feet. I thought the police had closed the road until I got closer. So SOME businesses are doing great.

        And with med pot being a prescribed “medication”, cruising to cop your weed is exempt.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Let me guess…weed is a go as are trips down to a “reproductive health center”, but going to grab a bottle of Beefeater is a no go. Because people really gotta have that Mary Jane, right?

  • avatar
    thelaine

    the Henry Ford Health Group issued a statement, as the Detroit News reported, assuring the public that the “letter was in preparation for a ‘worst case scenario,’ but has not been enacted as policy.” The Henry Ford Health Group stressed that its “hospital system has not reached capacity at any of its locations, nor has it reached the limit on ventilators at any of its hospitals.”

    Dr. Adnan Munkarah, the chief clinical officer for the hospital system, likewise attested that they “have by no means exhausted all of our resources or all of our options to take care of patients,” and that “the hospital system has an adequate supply of ventilators.”

    While Tapper later retweeted the Detroit News article, the damage had already been done. The fake news story of overrun hospitals leaving patients to die had already infected the public’s perception of the situation on the ground in Michigan. This viral story launched not even 24 hours after Birx gently reminded the press that “it’s our job collectively to assure the American people,” and following her assurances the narrative that hospitals didn’t have enough ventilators to treat their patients was false.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      You obviously don’t work in the health care industry, and obviously don’t know anybody who does.

      I work for a company that produces a variety of lifesaving medical devices, and have relatives and friends who are working with patients who have the virus. It’s not fake news.

      Your ignorance of even second-hand information is apparent and sad.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Writing in the New York Times, Dr David Katz, president of True Health Initiative and the founding director of the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, raised doubts about the current closure approach:

    “I am deeply concerned that the social, economic and public health consequences of this near total meltdown of normal life — schools and businesses closed, gatherings banned — will be long lasting and calamitous, possibly graver than the direct toll of the virus itself. The stock market will bounce back in time, but many businesses never will. The unemployment, impoverishment and despair likely to result will be public health scourges of the first order.”

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Chadafukup chithead.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        I wonder what song @the.laine.to.mass.death is going to sing now that Captain COVID extended restrictions out to the end of April?

        “if his administration keeps the death toll to 100,000, it will have done “a very good job”

        “We’re going to win so much. You’re going to get tired of winning. you’re going to say, ‘Please Mr. President, I have a headache. Please, don’t win so much. This is getting terrible.’

        Yup, people are literally dead tired of winning under COVID-45.

  • avatar

    Thank you but it never was in my calendar.

    Regarding the dispute here are few words of wisdom I can offer: after winter always spring is coming which turns into hot summer which does not continue forever instead turning into fall and then winter takes over again until next spring. And so it goes for millions of years. So my advice would be – buy low and sell high and there always will be light in the end of tunnel no matter how long and dark it is.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    I was hoping for a late September or an October show in Detroit when the show was being being changed from it’s January date. Disappointed in June and now that it’s canceled it’s really unfortunate for all involved. This is such a huge event for the city of Detroit.

    Perhaps the media unveils could still take place at different historic locations around Detroit to celebrate the industry and the city of Detroit.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    So many S#!theads in here nowadays. You can quote me on that

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