By on February 19, 2020

2020 Volvo XC40 front quarter

2020 Volvo XC40 T5 AWD Momentum

2.0-liter turbocharged four (248 hp @ 5500 rpm, 258 lb/ft @ 1800 rpm)

8-speed automatic transmission, all-wheel drive

22 city / 30 highway / 25 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

27.8 (observed mileage, MPG)

10.7 city / 7.7 highway / 9.4 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $36,695 US / $41,765 CAD

As Tested: $47,765 US/ $55,145 CAD

Prices include $995 destination charge in the United States and $2015 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

I’m almost certain there is an unwritten code for automotive reviewers that TTAC has generally avoided, if not openly mocked. You’ve seen the fruits of this code on newsstands, where every other month either a Camaro or a Mustang asks the other, in bold print, to STEP OUTSIDE. Another example is the inevitable requirement for someone reviewing a Volvo to somehow reference the awful Dudley Moore flick Crazy People and the “boxy-but-good” tagline.

We won’t talk about the faux Jaguar ad here. This is a family joint. For more discussion, select “private mode” on your browser of choice and look for TTAC After Dark.

Seems the good folks in Gothenburg were affected by the lighthearted fictional criticism, as since the late 1990s Volvo has been applying styling to its previously staid machines. The current-generation models are all stunners, from the largest wagons (swoon) to the smallest crossover, like this 2020 Volvo XC40 T5.

But is the beauty more than skin deep?

2020 Volvo XC40 profile

This is indeed the second XC40 I’ve reviewed in the past year or so. The first, in more budget-friendly front-drive T4 flavor, impressed me with excellent highway manners and fuel economy for its class. This all-wheel drive model in the Momentum trim has both more power and more plush.

2020 Volvo XC40 front 2020 Volvo XC40 rear

Yeah, it’s clear that I dig the styling of the XC40. Inside and out, it’s as handsome as a crossover can get. I could live without the flat black plastic cladding on the lower surfaces of the vehicle, but that’s seemingly a requirement for the class. I love the detail on the LED headlamp that Volvo refers to as Thor’s Hammer – it’s at once playful and functional.

2020 Volvo XC40 front seats

The red leather – Volvo calls it Oxide Red – is unusual these days, though growing up in the Eighties I recall many cars with velour in a shade my dad curiously referred to as “Whorehouse Red.” My wife isn’t a fan, but I love the splash of color that keeps everything from looking dull. I’d buy the XC40 for these seats alone, as they feel nearly perfect for me and my rear.

2020 Volvo XC40 rear seats

Rear seats are equally as comfortable, with plenty of leg and headroom even for me “sitting behind myself,” with the front seat adjusted for my 6’4” frame. This is still a compact crossover, but I could easily haul four adults of my size in plenty of comfort.

2020 Volvo XC40 interior

I love driving the XC40. No, it’s not a sports car, but it’s not supposed to be. It’s a small, agile crossover that’s easy to maneuver in tight city streets. If you’ve ever tried to park in the narrow cobblestoned-and-potholed alleys of Columbus’ German Village, you’ll appreciate a compact vehicle that gives excellent visibility; it’s also exceptionally stable and reassuring on long highway journeys. Expansion joints on the highway aren’t noticeable – the Volvo gives a quiet, jar-free ride.

I’m not sure I could justify the eleven thousand dollars’ worth of options tacked onto my tester. Easy trims to cut the cost would be the $645 metallic paint (though the choices would be limited to non-metallic black or white, while the extra-bucks paint offers grey, red, and silver), the $1,100 leather, the $1,475 panoramic moonroof, and the $1,000 20-inch alloy wheels.

2020 Volvo XC40 dashboard

My budget XC40 T5 would be in non-metallic black, with the blond textile seating, $600 convenience package (power passenger seat and automatic climate control), $750 heated front seats and steering wheel (Ohio weather sucks), and the $1,900 premium package, as it includes a keyless entry system, blind spot information system, parking assist, and wireless charging. I’d waffle a bit on the $1,750 Advanced Package – adaptive cruise control is a marvelous feature, but I’ve driven most of my life without it.

2020 Volvo XC40 center stack

That gets me most of the way to my test car for $39,195 delivered — a compelling package for the price. Forty thousand isn’t cheap – I still blanch at the thought of a monthly payment over three hundred dollars! — but considering what you get from both mainstream and luxury competition in this segment, the Volvo is priced reasonably.

2020 Volvo XC40 rear quarter

It may no longer be boxy, but it’s still quite good.

2020 Volvo XC40 badge

 

[Images: © 2020 Chris Tonn/TTAC]

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81 Comments on “2020 Volvo XC40 T5 Review – Style, Substance, Etcetera...”


  • avatar
    jkross22

    I love the quirky, very Volvo exterior design and I love the interior color options that they provide, but the interior ergo of modern Volvo is a tragedy. For a company that hangs it’s brand hat on safety, eliminating discrete buttons and switches for a screen that requires menu diving for most anything is a TERRIBLE decision.

    I don’t get how their goal of zero deaths in Volvos syncs with a distracting screen that takes attention away from driving.

    • 0 avatar
      SlowMyke

      There is only an issue if you assume human drivers are included in Volvo’s long term plans while aiming for zero deaths. With a big, button-less dash, autonomous driving aides and functions are surely being relied upon to save your bacon while you tap and scroll away. Oh you also have to assume these autonomous features are turned on and working properly, which has been an issue for Volvo in the past…

      But i agree with your sentiment- give me actual buttons, please.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Voice activation takes care of the primary issues while driving though (temperature and radio station), if you’re comfortable using that.

      • 0 avatar
        SlowMyke

        While it’s a step in the right direction, it’s still just an ok solution to a problem automakers have created themselves. I have voice activation for a limited amount of functions in my Lincoln, mostly Bluetooth, and it’s ok. But no matter what you do, voice controls will never be as simple and effective as well designed buttons and knobs. Give me large, distinct buttons in accessible places and I’ll never have to think or take my eyes of the road to change simple things like volume or temperature.

  • avatar
    Tomifobia

    Nah, still looks like a high-top sneaker to me, especially in white.

  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    I sat in one at the auto show and really liked it. It felt quite roomy for it’s size but i’d still go for a class up with more cargo room. And those huge rear pillars make for quite the blind spot. But I loved the interior design and choices for materials.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      For the life of me, I cant figure out who would buy one of these. At the tested price, you can get into a fully loaded Palisade Limited AWD and still have a grand left in your pocket. Then again, Ive never understood the audience for any Volvo product.

      • 0 avatar
        volvoguyincanada

        You don’t understand the audience for Volvo products because a Hyundai is not a comparable purchase.

        That being said, a compact Volvo isn’t for me either. Give me the full size please!

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          “Hyundai is not a comparable purchase”? Really? By any metric, Hyundai is a better purchase unless you are sworn to a somewhat “luxury” badge and willing to eat the associated depreciation. The Palisade is less expensive, more luxurious, more capable, has more room, has more standard features, and will retain more value.

          Volvo is toward the top for depreciation and toward the bottom for reliability. So I guess I can agree on it not being a comparable purchase.

          I do like the XC90 T6 with the all-around bucket seats. But at $75k, you can get a lot more car elsewhere and not be stuck with a wheezy undersize 4 cylinder powerplant.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The Volvo/Hyundai comparison is valid. It’s a battle of which one will need engine repair first, and the race to the BHPH lot.

    • 0 avatar
      Garrett

      The XC40 is great.

      Until you drive an XC60.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    $48K for this thing!!!

    Every time I start thinking a $50K Supra is a bad deal, another review like this comes along to set me straight.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      This. This is astoundingly overpriced for what you get for your money. I can see this maybe at $26k due to its faux Swedish flair, but this is hilarious to pay that much.

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        I think most small and midsize “cute-utes” are pretty low on the value scale. When considering that one could have had a similarly sized hatchback with more options for 30% less. Convincing consumers that faux capability is actually worth the premium has been perhaps the greatest ever boon to automakers the world over. Wouldn’t it great to see profit margins automakers make on individual vehicles when purchased at MSRP. The lowly Chevy Spark bringing in $10.00 for its maker and something like this $20k in profit.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          “ Wouldn’t it great to see profit margins automakers make on individual vehicles when purchased at MSRP. ”

          This, I believe it was a couple years back it was revealed police departments were purchasing new Tahoes from GM for about $25k a pop. That’s shows a huge markup to consumers.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            That’s shows a huge markup to consumers.

            When a W-body Impala was MSRPing in the $20Ks with few options the fleet model was being blow out for $12K.

            Such is the way of the world.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Damn at $12k even I would have bought one.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            This was for the 3.6VVT six speed auto, bench seat, column shift. Remote trunk release and auto headlights were standard. The only thing I really thought was “wrong” with the last of the Ws was the rear seats being too close to the floor. You would either be knees in chest or legs splayed to be in there.

            Not bad for gobbling up the miles and so anonymous that no one paid attention to you.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            If you were a salesman you would have just sold a W-body 3.6L Impala for $12k to me.

            Puts into perspective what a pile of crap this Volvo is.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      FFS – can the B&B please stop freaking out about the price of vehicles when fully loaded. The base price is $36k. A tiny Honda HR-V Touring is $28,890.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        For 36k you could be in a V8 car with several options, or a discounted 4 door truck. $36k is a lot of money for a vehicle that is not a performance vehicle, and does not have truck like capabilities. This essentially occupies the same space as a Geo Tracker.

        Comparing the top spec of the Honda to the bottom spec of the Volvo speaks spades. You could have a Japanese branded vehicle or Chinese branded vehicle, while I believe Honda produces vehicles of dubious quality I wouldn’t hesitate choose the luxury packaged Honda over the bare bones Volvo that we know is going to be a disaster. At $7k premium that decision is a no brainer.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I’m sure the urban women who are shopping these have Chargers and Silverados next on their lists.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            The CRV or RAV4 would be the most sensible option if someone’s going to spend the money for this class. This vehicle answers the question no one asked.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The whole point of this class of vehicle is to look more upscale than a CR-V or RAV4. If that’s not important to you, that’s fine, but it is the whole reason that this, and its German competitors, exist.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            But it doesn’t look more upscale, it’s *not* more upscale on fit, finish, and likely material quality, and the brand name, while never really upscale during my life time, is quite possibly at the lowest point in its history. No one looks at a Volvo (let alone a tiny crossover) and thinks it’s upscale.

            Nearly dead Buick has more brand cache.

            This brand occupies the same space Plymouth occupied 25 years ago, not rock bottom status but no one gives it a second look when wanting premium image.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I don’t know what’s true where you are, but around here the new XC90 is one of THE vehicles of choice for very wealthy moms, and I don’t think the brand has ever been stronger. People are cross-shopping them with X7s and Range Rover Sports. Go wait in the private school pickup line and there will be one within five cars of you.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I’ll give you most euro cars have cache among status seekers but the Volvo above could just as easily be mistaken for a Kia.

        • 0 avatar
          Daniel J

          @Hummer,

          I would not touch the 1.5t and cvt Honda with a 60 foot pole.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Daniel, a Chinese supercharged turbocharged scooter engine isn’t exactly a step up. I agree we are comparing two real steaming piles of excrement, but I would still give preference to the automaker that isn’t a bit player.

          • 0 avatar

            I got one as a loaner when the MDX was in for a valve train belt (every 110k miles !). Horrible. Slow. Noisy. This is a Honda ? Now I know why they react the way they do when I try to pass them…they are at full chat at 75 mph already….so anyone going faster is clearly crazy.

      • 0 avatar
        Daniel J

        Jmo,

        I agree. A Cx5 turbo with awd signature is 38K plus and IMHO is worth it. CRV and Rav 4 don’t have the power.

      • 0 avatar

        I recall when the 944 was “too expensive” at 25k. The evil marketers who set car prices are very good at what they do. Like jmo says, those crappy boxes that jam up my commute are about 35k each. Want engine or lux ? Mid 40’s. Want Badge and big engine ? 50’s. I regularly park my Benz next to pickup trucks that cost more….

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      You have a point there.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      No one is going to buy one loaded up with every option like this. Out the door they will go for $40k, and, more importantly, they’ll fit just fine into a $449/month lease.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      I don’t understand why everyone on here suddenly goes full on stupid when they see the price of a modern vehicle. Does no one understand marketing, or prices given when they are loaded vehicles? Not to mention branding of “luxury” or “entry luxury brands or vehicles? Why is it that 40 grand is fine for a loaded vehicle that they like but not when it’s a class or brand they don’t like? Go out and buy a damn $17K Hyundai Accent then because that’s probably all the car many people really “need”.

      • 0 avatar
        Daniel J

        N8iveVA,

        I have no idea why either. I would take an XC40 over an XT4, even though I like the XT4 exterior better. 30K in 2010 is almost 37K with inflation now. One thing folks here aren’t considering is that small SUVs are holding their value much better than their sedan counter parts. The XC40 is also undercutting the Germans by a few grand, and the X1 and Q3 IMHO aren’t premium products either.

        As far as this Chinese nonsense goes, not all of these are made in China. Some are made in Belgium. And its not like Buick isn’t made in China either.

        Oooh, but you can buy a Dodge Charger V8 for that kinda money! Really? Really? I sat in a 2019 Charger RT with upgraded interior bits and the only thing nice I had to say was the Harmon Kardon stereo was halfway decent. The rest of the interior was a joke. Yes, it has power. Thats about it.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        What the hell are you getting for spending $40k on this? It looks like a rebadged Kia and the only thing interesting are red colored seats. Otherwise every single part of this vehicle is a huge let down in design.

        No one honestly looks at this and thinks the person driving it is “better” than the person driving a CRV, why does that matter? Because there’s no other reason someone would buy this other than under the false belief others will judge them differently.

        Even if the V8 Charger isn’t luxurious, and it’s not, at least your getting something special for your money, and least when someone asks why you spent $40k you can show them what your money bought.

        What exactly does a consumer that spent $40k on a Chinese crossover have to show for their money? Prestige? No. Power? No. Luxury? Nope. What? I can’t figure it out. This vehicle looks so exceedingly cheaply made, it’s completely relying on the badge to make up for what it lacks.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Since my original comment has spawned a lively discussion, let me just say that it was intended to put into perspective the complaints about other vehicles being over priced.

          I know $40-50k is the going rate for a 4 cyl luxury compact CUV. I know cars are expensive (but not compared to inflation)

          My point is simply that anyone who finds the price of this vehicle to be reasonable doesn’t have much of a leg to stand on when they complain about a $50K Supra or a $55K F150.

        • 0 avatar
          N8iveVA

          How is it any different than what Lexus does? Only difference is Volvo doesn’t have a “mainstream” brand selling a version that’s $30k. And showing someone your $40k Charger that’s really a new 8 year old car isn’t going to sway any opinions other than maybe a few gearheads.

          • 0 avatar
            Daniel J

            N8iveVA,

            Exactly. There really isn’t anything about a charger. I’ve got a buddy with an RT with a few packages and the interior is junk compared to the Accord I test drove a year earlier, and his was brand new. On top of all that, the Accord was just as fast with the 2.0T.

            Hummer,

            As far as special compared to a CRV? Not where I live. Volvo is treated here as a premium brand over Honda/CRV and in some circles, even above Acura depending on who you talk to. The RDX is a better proposition IMHO but it gets over 40K depending on options too. I can’t tell you how many new XC60’s I’ve seen rolling around here.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            It’s very different than Lexus in that the Lexus badge has cache that Volvo could only dream of. The Lexus will actually be worth money outside of warranty, and the Lexus is more likely to be drove by someone that didn’t stretch their purse to afford it.

            The thing it, a new 8 year old V8 car is much more impressive than a 4 cylinder front wheel drive, compact, minivan wanna-be, by a Chinese company that’s fronting the vehicle as if it is luxury by applying pie-in-the-sky pricing to a turd.

            I still have yet to see anyone point out what your $40k is purchasing – it’s certainly not luxury or Prestige.

            The thing is the Charger knows what it is, it’s not a luxury car, it’s a touring sedan that swallows up large swaths of road with a significantly more luxurious engine than any Volvo in production.

            We could just as easily pick out the acres of hard plastic in the $40k minivan in this article, biggest difference is this is trying to be something it is not.

          • 0 avatar
            N8iveVA

            Hummer: “The thing it, a new 8 year old V8 car is much more impressive than a 4 cylinder front wheel drive, compact, minivan wanna-be, by a Chinese company that’s fronting the vehicle as if it is luxury by applying pie-in-the-sky pricing to a turd.”

            To you maybe, not to people in the market for an entry level luxury CUV. While Volvo can’t command BMW prices they are trying to push upmarket. Just how successfully they are doing this is debatable but they certainly don’t look and feel like a $25k Chevy or Toyota. I get it, you don’t like these type of vehicles. You want everything to be big full framed V8’s. But guess what, V8 rear drive large sedans are not the future. Like it or not. I’m not thrilled with that thought either.

  • avatar
    johnnyz

    Car and Driver had no problems on their long term test with the turbo and supercharged 2.0L.

    I’m sure that the over boosted and under engineered 4 will spring leaks, fry the turbo and just cost a ton to maintain.

    Looks like a long term liability for the the future used car owner. Caveat emptor.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      There are days where I think the complexity of new vehicles has reached a point where as long as you stay within your budget, it’s not that foolish to buy new, pay it off as close to warranty expiration as possible, and then lather rinse, repeat…

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Constant car payments is never the answer, consumers still have options that don’t include CVTs, turbos, DI, or otherwise failure prone tech.
        For some making poor financial decisions is a habit, for others there are still new vehicles available that will have low cost of ownership for several hundred thousand miles.

        Buying a Chinese crossover with a needlessly complex engine for $45k is a perfect example of the former.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Not everyone wants to drive something for several hundred thousand miles, though.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Even if you didn’t want to drive something for several hundred thousand miles – which to me sounds like an error was made when the vehicle was bought – being picky about choosing a vehicle that is reliable becomes important at trade in time. I would prefer to trade in a 4Runner over trading in a similarly priced (when new) Chinese vehicle we see above.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “Constant car payments is never the answer”

          I wouldn’t choose this particular vehicle, but as income goes up this scenario becomes less of a problem.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @ajla, yes – and at least for those people who have the discipline to pay something off instead of being constantly under water.

            I would argue that Volvo’s success with the “subscription model” has shown some people are very attracted to a payment model.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Even with increased financial stability, it never makes sense to drop $500-700 a month permanently for the rest of your life over buying the vehicle and holding it for 8-10 years and budgeting a couple hundred dollars of repairs a year.

            With my fleet of vehicles at my house I don’t often spend money on repairs, yes I’ve had an odd transmission rebuild that costs $1,500, some ball joints that set me back $30 a piece, alternator, etc – but nothing near a car payment.
            Why? Because I buy vehicles that suit my needs, are generally reliable, hold their value, have good aftermarket support (which typically indicate a good platform), are comfortable, and have tested technology without being over bearing or in my way.

            Buying something and getting rid of it in 5 years is financially irresponsible, the consumer clearly didn’t buy the right vehicle the first time around imo.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Buying something and getting rid of it in 5 years is financially irresponsible”

            Maybe. But I’m not too worried about financial ruin on an expense that is 4% of my gross income.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            lol with my trade in vehicles I’ve never been more than about $420 per month. But I’m a stickler for budget and I’m never paying more than one car note at a time.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “Maybe. But I’m not too worried about financial ruin on an expense that is 4% of my gross income.”

            This. I made a ton of other difficult decisions and put in a ton of hours. One of the motivating factors was to drive the stuff that I listed after for years versus spending a decade in something boring. Is something like an Alfa 4c ever the “right” car? Probably not. Would I ever regret buying it (or leasing even)? Not unless I try to keep it for a decade.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ I listed after for years versus spending a decade in something boring.”

            But there are reliable, or semi reliable vehicles that are interesting. Don’t get me wrong the Gulia with that 6 cylinder is glorious and will surely bankrupt the wrong buyer – but there are options that are reliable and can bring the same joy without the constant fear of repairs.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “But there are reliable, or semi reliable vehicles that are interesting.”

            That’s true. But I’m not trading in after 5 or 6 years solely due to reliability fears. I just want to try something different. I wouldn’t keep a GS-f any longer than a Quadrifoglio.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “but there are options that are reliable and can bring the same joy without the constant fear of repairs.”

            Name it. The answer is not really. I mean BMW M cars are their own barrel of issues as are any of the Europeans. You can get 80 percent there with the sporty Lexuses but 80 percent is still a compromise. Something like a Stinger is fun but far from premium and looks like it spun out in a Pep Boys accessory aisle. And the 4c? What else can I get…an Elise maybe? Not much better.

            look, there is no car that will not need something in “several hundred thousand miles”. At my hourly rate that math doesn’t add up. Is it not the best financially, maybe, but I’m funding my retirement quite well as it is…no sense in not enjoying the fruits of my labor. Not everyone that drives new cars frequently has an 8 year note and 3 cars worth of negative equity. People like to feel smart. Thats fine. Some people made other smart decisions.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I drive an SS, its handling is comparable to an M series, it’s engine is in a different league more reliable while having an aftermarket that BMW could wish for. And if it’s your thing, I’ve found I get more attention in this car than a pink Excursion limousine.

            You have the Corvette, which is reliable, gets great MPG and is an excellent performance choice

            The Miata is a great one

            Mustang

            All much cheaper and significantly more reliable with a LCO over anything from Europe.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            They don’t make the SS sedan any longer while the C8 is undergoing massive changes that may impact its future durability.

            The Miata and Mustang are both are both great cars that I may end up buying some day (some day soon in the case of the Mustang), but I’ll still be surprised if I keep either for 10 years.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Still C7s on the lot, and everyone that wanted a Reliable performance sedan had plenty of time to jump on an SS if their money was where their mouth is.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            There is quite literally no vehicle that existed from 1899 to 2020 that I’d voluntarily keep as a daily driver for 10 years. Not a C7. Not an SS. Not a ’90 Trofeo. Not a Land Cruiser.

            I’m just not interested in keeping something more than about 5 years unless I really have to.

        • 0 avatar
          Mr. Monte

          I agree Hummer on most of your points!

          • 0 avatar
            johnnyz

            I had a 1997 540i and sold it with 245k miles.

            Perhaps the last of the reliable BMW’s.

            It still looked really nice, however the Minnesota roads and salt took a toll on the undercarriage. The unibody “frame rails” look less German and more like Swiss cheese!

            Back to the point, all of these turbo fours with di are, in my opinion much less likely to be long-term reliable then a easy-going big cube motor.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    No, this looks too much like the Jeep Compass, Rav4, Cadillac XT4 starter kits. If you like a 2.0 turbo get the Ford Escape for $15K less

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I haven’t been able to find a listing of the 2020 Escape’s ground clearance. I’m thinking it’s been getting lower to the ground generation by generation.

      (Which suits this wagon guy just fine.)

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I’ve spent the better part of 15 minutes searching for an answer, I’ve found every spec possible with the exception of ground clearance

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Same here, it’s like Ford doesn’t want you to know.

          Psssssssssss Ford, when we find the answer, if it is 6 in or less – It’s actually a car. :-)

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            If you care about such things they have that baby Bronco thing for you. Yes, the new Escape is just a wagon. Don’t tell the Soccer Moms.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Art, at this point I may be too old to enjoy that “baby Bronco thing” if it ever sees the light of day :(

            A rugged Escape with a 2.0T sounds like heaven to me, but that wait…

          • 0 avatar
            N8iveVA

            Lie2me: I thought the “Baby Bronco” is coming out this Fall?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Ok, I just read that there’s to be a major rollout of both Broncos this March/April

            See what I mean?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’ve tried one of these out, and if you’re used to driving something like an economy car or family-hauler CUV, this probably feels like a M3. But if you drive a car with some performance chops, it feels…meh.

    I have a bad, bad feeling that before long, performance *cars* that aren’t Porsches, Corvettes, ponycars, Miatas, or German supersedans are going to disappear. When that happens, cars like this one will be the ones that moderately-heeled enthusiasts will be stuck with. Not a good day, if you ask me.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      My fear exactly.

      The only cars that will be “worth a damn” in the performance department will start to be priced in a way that the only guys owning them will be the guys we make fun of in those “Cars and Coffee” crash videos.

  • avatar
    Mark

    I recently picked up a Golf Allrack SEL with a 6 speed for ~$33K. Very happy with how it drives and only vehicle in its class with a standard transmission.

  • avatar
    Eliyahu

    Wouldn’t it be nice to find a vehicle with comfortable seats(the red is bonus), decent suspension (don’t feel the expansion joints), and a little better fuel economy(22mpg in city for this Volvo), for maybe $34,000 out the door?

    Why is it the all no manufacturer but Subaru thinks we should be able to see out the rear door windows and the cargo area windows? If we wanted a “coupe”, wouldn’t we buy one?

  • avatar
    Carrera

    I have tried to steer one of my co-workers towards buying one of these slightly used for his wife. He could not find many, if any, in Central Florida. He ended up buying a nice Cadillac XT4 with 8500 miles for $32,000. Also, Volvo being a Chinese company was putting him off a bit. I like the little thing. Actually, I think all their SUVs look good at the moment.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I rode in one of these 2 weekends ago and it was roomier than I expected. Was quite and comfortable, and Volvo seems to still be doing great with comfy seats. It was dark so didn’t see much, but do prefer Volvo interiors in lighter shades and not black. I wouldn’t pay so much for any car, but it was nice and the owners loves it so that’s what matters.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Point 1: Nothing wrong with boxes. Boxy designs (Scion xB, Honda Element, Kia Soul, and now the Telluride) have always sold well.

    Point 2: Sorry, but if you consider yourself a luxury or near-luxury brand, blind spot, (p)leather, adaptive cruise control, and cross-traffic alert are entry-level items for any vehicle starting above $30k. Make Nappa-quality leather, pano roof, wood trim, ventilated seats and assistive steering options if you must.

  • avatar
    baggins

    Hummer – it’s cachet. Cache =/ Cachet. Look it up.

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