By on November 22, 2019

Lordstown Motors

From the Mustang Mach-E to the Cybertruck in a matter of days. What a week it’s been. While the verdict is still coming in on Tesla’s, um, interesting take on an electric pickup, an auto giant and an upstart automaker that just bought a big assembly plant are happy to offer an alternative.

Of course, neither General Motors nor Lordstown Motors have a physical, production-ready pickup to show you, but many would argue Tesla doesn’t, either. Yet both rival EV pickups are on the way, the companies claim. One’s already taking pre-orders.

Announced this week, Lordstown Motors, which came to life earlier this year and recently purchased the mothballed GM Lordstown Assembly in northeast Ohio, is taking $1,000 deposits on the upcoming Endurance — its name for a conventionally styled crew cab electric pickup. Starting price for the Lordstown Endurance (seen above) is $52,500, with the fledgling company hoping to roll out the first examples in late 2020.

First, Lordstown will have to raise some capital. Retooling is expected to begin at the facility within the next two months, but the automaker still needs to secure $300 million in financing to get the operation off the ground.

Lordstown claims its truck will offer up to 260 miles of range.

Far fewer details exist for GM’s upcoming EV pickup, though GM CEO Mary Barra took the opportunity this week to provide an update on the model’s timeline. As reported by Reuters, the unnamed truck will go on sale in the fall of 2021 — probably beating Cybertruck to the market.

“It will be a very capable truck, I’m pretty excited about it,” Barra said of the vehicle, which will call Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly home. There’s a chance GM might revive the Hummer name for its upcoming EV.

Ford, of course, has its own EV pickup in the works. GM’s effort seems to be a direct response to this challenge from the top-selling truck maker, and Ford’s electric F-150 may well beat GM to the market. Not to be outdone, Michigan-based upstart Rivian also expects to have an electric pickup, the R1T, in driveways that same year. Starting at $69,000, the R1T offers up to 400 miles of driving range.

If and when the Cybertruck goes on sale, it won’t have the niche segment to itself.

[Image: Lordstown Motors]

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35 Comments on “Not Feeling the Cybertruck Love? GM and Lordstown Motors Ask That You Consider Something Less Avant-garde...”


  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    While the company Lordstown Motors is new, Workhorse is a part owner and their W-15 is supposed to be the starting point for the Lordstown truck. It too was supposed to sell for $52,500 though in 2018 money when it was supposed to start production. They do have, or at least did have in 2017, a running and driving prototype. https://www.motortrend.com/news/workhorse-w15-4wd-plug-electric-work-truck-prototype-first-drive-review/ And they supposedly had 6,000 orders when they claimed it would be available in 2018.

    So if they raise the money quickly enough they just might be able to make it to the market in the not too distant future. Surprisingly they still have a W-15 Page on their website. http://workhorse.com/_test2019/W-15.html#about-2

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    First picture: That cowl (reserved-word violation?) is way too high for no good reason.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      There is a family of kangaroos in there.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Somebody (don’t recall) promised me a frunk (front trunk) on my future electric work truck purchases. If you give me a frunk, I’m going to put tools in it. Some of those tools are made of steel (some automobiles used to be made of steel). Steel is relatively dense, i.e., heavy here on planet Earth. If the liftover height for the frunk is shoulder-height, I’m going to think of you every time I load and unload. These will not be good thoughts.

        Also, there was a time (outside of Steve McQueen chase scenes) when there were more than two vehicles on the road at the same time and it was important to see other vehicles and indeed to be able to see the road itself (cf. “hill”). Extreme hood/cowl height is counter to this basic vehicle requirement.

        If the family of kangaroos is capable of producing 12-14 SCFM of air at 150 psi, we may be able to negotiate (depending upon energy input required and any waste generated).

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Not to mention getting anything out of the bottom of that Frunk, unless it is a Fray (Front tray), and from looking at the chassis it doesn’t seem like there will be much useable room up there. http://workhorse.com/_test2019/W-15.html#about-2

          But properly done a built in tool box in front would likely be appreciated by many.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “It will be a very capable truck, I’m pretty excited about it”

    Not *very* excited? Hmmmm…

  • avatar
    Garrett

    Yawn.

    Cybertruck or GTFO if you are going electric.

    I’m not big on Tesla, but they did the equivalent of what Dodge did. when they introduced the big-rig look for the Ram.

    Anyone else attempting to do an electric truck that looks like a normal truck might as well go back to the drawing board.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Anyone attempting to do an electric full size pickup that doesn’t look like a normal truck should go back to the drawing board. The key to winning in the full size segment are fleet sales. That give the economy of scale to make retail sales the icing on the cake instead of the make or break. Fleets want a truck that looks normal and has commonality with their gas powered fleetmates, for easy upfitting, service and repair.

      • 0 avatar
        Garrett

        Why would they do that? You’re competing with Ford and GM at that point.

        Leave the commercial market to commercial vehicles. Focus on the people that are buying a truck to support their lifestyle and are willing to pay through the nose.

    • 0 avatar
      Lemmiwinks

      Funny, but the 1994 Dodge Ram is exactly what I thought of when I saw Tesla’s pickup. And the 1986 (and 1996) Ford Taurus. And the 1991 Saturn.

      I hate boring car design. (I also drive a Juke Nismo, because of course I do.) I know these vehicles can be polarizing. But I love how they push us on to what’s next, some folks kicking and screaming.

      • 0 avatar
        Fliggin_De_Fluge

        Oh geez. Hyperbole much? But honestly, doesn’t surprise me to see the shills come out of the woodwork after this 70’s retro crap fest was shown. ITS SOOOO INNOVATIVE EVERYBODY!

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    So basically we’re going from zero to at least 5 EV pickups in a relative blink of an eye. Is there really going to be that much demand for these things?

    Maybe that’s why Mary seems a little disinterested at best.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Unlike the Mock-E and the CYBRTRK, this seems to acknowledge that back seat passengers can have heads too.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Back seat passengers usually are the ones paying the note.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        That’s what people said right before sedans with sloping roofs that seriously compromised rear seat headroom didn’t sell like the generations that had rear seat headroom. Now only the Accord and Camry have buyers, the two cars not designed by fools. If every new car buyer is a selfish psychopath who doesn’t want their passengers to be comfortable, why are there CUVs with full sized rear seats everywhere instead of two-door coupes? Even pickup trucks rushed through the cab and a half phase into the present of comfortable seating for everyone.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          I share your loathing for low rooflines in sedans, but the end point in this case isn’t a foot behind the passenger, it’s at the end of a 6.6 foot bed. Look at video of people riding in the thing: there’s an insane amount of headroom front and back, way more than in any conventional truck.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I’m sorry, but all I see here is smoke and mirrors. No running vehicles, no real orders and a mothballed factory that can put out literally hundreds of thousands of vehicles, just so these guys can build, what? 5-6,000 trucks a year?

    It looks like the Mahoning Valley got screwed again. Thanks GM.

    I predict this will whole deal will be dead in less than a year. If it survives 2020, I will be shocked.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Actually Workhorse is part owner of Lordstown motors and they are bringing their W-15 as the basis for this truck. The did have a a running prototype of that at one point before they postponed putting it into production. I posted a link to a road test of it above. They claim to have 6,000 orders for the W-15.

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        You might have a better chance of getting your three wheeled Elio Motors death machine before Lordstown builds an electric anything.
        But wait,… maybe they could merge! A three wheeled pickup truck! Brilliant! Nobody else makes one! All they need is several billion dollars of other people’s money that will be funneled into the pockets of the executives before they go broke again and put out their hands for more.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      I posted earlier not as a statement on whether BEVs are good or bad, or just to exhibit the usual TTAC snark. This thing has all of the hallmarks of a bad deal. Several investors who have come and gone, minimal sales, restructurings, vehicles promised and not delivered.

      What irritates me is the hurried nature of this deal. It almost seems like this happened in order to placate some folks who know little about the industry and want to check off another item in their PR list. Rather than a Potemkin village, a Potemkin factory.

      For the folks who live in the valley, this outfit will never come close to replacing the capacity that GM had there. I see a bunch of siphoning of the government’s and other people’s money along with shaky management and frequently changing product lines.

      Maybe they’ll get the USPS contract and actually build vehicles. Maybe they’ll actually sell the “octodrone” delivery thing that has been the next big product.

      Maybe they’ll actually build a blimp factory…

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Always thought the initial EVs should have been trucks. I felt that their chassis were better built for the additional weight of batteries and their use was normally local.
    Needing a truck that has more than 300 mile range seems a bit over the top.
    So if a truck can get out a daily dose or 250/300 miles, it be great.
    And Californians will buy every damn one.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I agree.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Part of me would love to go Gadget Abbott on my 1995 GMT400. But it sees very low miles and the 305 runs fine.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Always thought the initial EVs should have been trucks. I felt that their chassis were better built for the additional weight of batteries and their use was normally local.”

      Don’t agree with that statement because of how I’ve always used my trucks……..but maybe I couldn’t be more wrong.

      It will be interesting to see if it’s PU trucks that actually get EV vehicles more mainstream. 3 years with my Chevy Volt as a DD has convinced me that EV’s are a no brainer as a 2nd or 3rd vehicle. They definitely drive much better than an ICE and the instant, effortless torque at any speed is fabulous!

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        The logical first use of a BEV has always been as a small in town commuter vehicle. A second vehicle that takes you to work and to the store and local errands but always returns home at the end of the day to be charged. And the problem has always been that the upfront cost outweighed the advantage. Batteries are certainly much better than they’ve ever been and this use case is now within reach. And with a little inconvenience and planning you can drive pretty much anywhere. Tesla at least has spurred greater acceptance of BEV’s but they still cost more overall.
        Incremental acceptance in the market, incremental increase in market share, approaching cost parity but not there yet and probably not going to get there any time soon. Despite the baseless, fact free fanboy hype.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    What will be interesting to see if the EV truck can be 1. sold profitably and 2. if the EV truck can push EVs out of 2% total market share.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    CVT transmissions and turbo charged 3 and 4 cylinders along with higher content ethanol gas might make me an EV convert. That might be the plan to make ICE vehicles so undesirable and unreliable that buyers flock to EVs. Seems that is the direction that Government regulators across the Globe are going toward.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      If you don’t want a hamster wheel car, and you’re not ready to go electric, Toyota has a hybrid version of pretty much every car in their line. Big displacement four with no turbo, electric motor for ample torque and seamless stop-start, and taxicab-proven reliability over hundreds of thousands of miles. Seems like a much better solution for great MPG than strapping a turbo the size of a Greyhound’s on an engine the size of a moped’s and praying.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    Tesla won’t have a niche electric pickup market to itself, but it won’t be a niche market for long. The first generation will be niche vehicles. The second generation should be competitive, and the third generation may be dominant. The current players in light trucks can’t afford not to be heavily invested in electric propulsion.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Tesla already had most of the niche EV market, they will likely own it moving forward in the near term as well. The next year will be both very interesting and telling. The companies partnering with Rivian and Workhorse were wise to do so because they really don’t know how its all going to play out, and they don’t have access to the Konami code like Musk does – they have to play by the established rules of business.

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