By on November 11, 2019

“You can have any color you want, so long as it’s white… or silver,” General Motors not so famously told this writer last summer, after a disheveled man walked through their doors in search of a bargain-basement ride.

Yours truly made the right choice, and it seems the rest of the world followed. White is by far the world’s most popular automotive paint color, topping a palette that shuns vividness and excitement with a passion. Thankfully, a color this writer loathes due to its overuse in the previous decade is still dropping, falling to its lowest point in more than a decade.

The annual study by coatings industry giant Axalta (its 67th) sheds light on an industry that, while constantly evolving, always keeps the grayscale at the forefront.

Since 2011, buyers have made white their No. 1 paint choice; the take rate on a global scale now stands at 38 percent, though its popularity differs depending on region. More than half of Chinese car buyers (57 percent) chose white in 2019.

Mercifully, silver has fallen drastically from its all-time high of 26 percent in 2010. It’s now at 10 percent and no longer among the top three choices. If you guessed black was the runner-up in this race, you’re bang-on. Global take rate for black vehicles stands at 19 percent, and that matches its popularity in North America, too. In the premium field, black reigns supreme, gobbling up 28 percent of N.A.’s high-end volume. In Europe, 33 percent of luxury vehicles are sold in black.

The third-place choice should surprise no one, and it’s a shade that may challenge black for the silver medal position before too long: gray. This writer’s favorite paint choice (he’s owned three grey sedans in the past), gray makes up 13 percent of new vehicle coatings in 2019, up 1 percent from last year. This year, gray topped the list in Europe for the first time (at 24 percent). In North America, it’s a more modest 17 percent, but only two points behind black.

Altogether, white, black, gray, and silver made up 80 percent of the world’s new vehicles this past year, which is off only two percent from the most non-colorful year in recent memory (2010). Too much color stimulates, we suppose, but these findings shouldn’t be seen as a tombstone for vivid hues. Blue is having a good year.

Blue happens to be a fast-rising star, capturing 7 percent of global car buyers. A versatile and variable color, blue’s popularity is highest in Europe and North America, where it seduced 10 percent of new car buyers in 2019. In the domestic market, blue rose two percentage points since this time last year. Still, this is a far cry from 1961, when 26 percent of North American buyers greeted an incoming President Kennedy by springing for blue cars.

Red isn’t far behind in this region, at 9 percent of sales; nowhere is red more popular than in North America. Globally, red accounts for 6 percent of all new vehicles.

While brown, beige, and tan are colors not commonly seen leaving dealers (this would be a different story if it were the mid-1970s), there is one place that still loves the earthtones: Russia. Buyers in the Motherland saw fit to make brown or off-brown their top choice in 12 percent of sales.

If you’re a lover of green, sorry to deliver this news: There’s not many green cars. That color sits at the bottom of the mainstream ladder at just 1 percent.

[Image: Daimler AG, Ford, Honda]

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66 Comments on “Not Black and White (but Mostly): Paint Preferences Remain Tame for 2019...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    Availability of colors is awful, I will never own silver as it’s the most depressing of all colors, never another black as it’s impossible to clean, and white only if it suites the cars styling.

    Unfortunately for my SS it was purchased on one of the last ship loads and manual availability in different colors was slim, white it was.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      I generally love silver but it really depends on the car. A picture of a bright silver 911 graced the wall of my bedroom as a teen….just above my die cast replica silver Porsche 959.

      I’ve owned a total of 6 silver cars since reaching age 16. I went really crazy this time around and went with white lol. Every car that both my wife and I have owned has been silver (6), white (3), black (3) or grey (2).

      • 0 avatar
        macmcmacmac

        Hah. We probably had the same 959 on our shelves.

        Having just gotten rid of my 2009 silver Focus, I will say silver always manages to look clean. It tends to blend into the background a bit much though. Most of the close calls I have had have been with silver cars not being particularly visible under the right conditions of weather and background.

        Am I the only one who fondly remembers the teal of the late 80s-early 90s? Sure, it was everywhere and ultimately overdone, but I always found it very appealing. Same with yellow and Chrysler purple.

        Green is my favourite colour, so I’m sad to see it is so unpopular, but even I got sick of seeing the endless forest green minivans and Grand Cherokees filling the lot of the Mopar dealer I worked at at the tail end of the last century. There was also this iridescent green second gen Taurus that they couldn’t give away. The outside wasn’t so bad, but the inside was green on green on green. I remember one woman saying” Nice car, but my God, the colour!”

        I picked up an immaculate black Chrysler 200c last month. Yes, it is impossible to keep clean, especially so when some jackass smears his red paint all over your now-crumpled passenger door a week after you by it.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I’ve owned many white cars – but no more! I just can’t stand the blandness, that feeling of driving a refrigerator.

  • avatar
    amadorcarguy

    I have had my share of white vehicles, and several dark green cars. Now give me a shade of gray. Love my 17 Yukon Denali in Iridium Metallic, wife’s 19 Enclave in Dark Slate Metallic. Just wish interiors were more than just mostly black.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I’ve had three straight silver cars by happenstance, not by choice, but I’ve grown to love the color because it tolerates dirt and tiny paint imperfections better than any other. Right now I have to park both of our vehicles outside, and the silver one looks considerably better than the dark gray one despite being three years older and having 50k more miles.

    Black cars are gorgeous when perfect but will show the world the slightest hairline scratch in the paint and look awful when even a bit dirty. Dark gray cars are the same, just less extreme about it. Either you spend a ton of time and effort on your paint or it looks like you don’t take care of it at all.

    White depends on both the car and the shade of white. Expensive cars in pearl white typically look pretty good when clean, although mud is conspicuous. Cheaper cars in white, especially plain white, look like government fleet cars. In any event the worldwide lead of white is probably at least somewhat attributable to its utility in very hot places.

    The right blue is one of the best car colors, but a lot of blues lately are too loud. Red is almost always too loud.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I think white’s popularity, at least in the US is mainly due to fleets, but also to retail buyers in sunny and hot climates.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I have to admit, had I been buying my GTI up in Maine, it would have been the dark blue. But I bought it for my place in FL, and it sits out in the sun most of the time. So it is appliance white. Which thankfully is a great color on a GTI with the red accents and brake calipers.

        My Fiata is metallic black, because for the price beggers couldn’t be choosers. But the only color I would have preferred in 2018 is the sort of khaki green that they had, and they sold about three of them in the US. For 2019 they added a lovely dark blue, of course. I hate red on cars, and the other Fiata colors were white, metallic white, and 2-3 shades of gray. So I suffer with keeping the metallic black clean. Not SO hard in FL thankfully, though having to hand-wash it in the FL summer kind of sucks.

        Up in Maine both my BMW and Land Rover are green, and my Spitfire is red. If I ever have the Spitfire painted, it won’t be red. Again, begger took when he could get in decent condition 25 years ago. BMW was special ordered, Land Rover I just got lucky and got one in a great color.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    I wish I could upload a picture of my work parking lot- 7 white or silver cars in a row then mine in header orange. It’s no wonder I’m the only person here in a good mood.

  • avatar
    gozar

    I’ll just leave this here:
    https://tinyurl.com/qvmywsa

  • avatar
    lstanley

    I just don’t get the rational behind a blue car and black rims like the Acura above. It looks like a bruise!

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I recently picked up a CX-5 and when asked if I had a color preference I said anything but black, white, or silver. Landed on Mazda’s signature red. Helps that red is my favorite color. The other color available was dark blue, which I would have also taken were red unavailable. The rest with the kit that I wanted were black and silver.

  • avatar
    JMII

    I’ve owned pretty every color car imaginable short of teal and purple. I’ve had (in order): beige, red (x2), yellow, green (x2), black, blue, silver, white (with brown trim!), orange, red and blue. I love COLOR and hate the 50 shades of grey that dominate the industry.

    Silver/Grey is good if just don’t care because it looks the same clean or dirty. I think its popular because is so generic its guaranteed to not offend anyone. I purposely bought a silver truck knowing I wasn’t going to waste my time waxing it. In retrospect I should have gotten beige because it hides dirt even better. Black is too hot and is impossible to keep looking good. Black can look amazing but one swirl mark and my OCD kicks in. White just doesn’t pop visually to me. Most cars look great with a fresh coat of wax but white? Nope it’s still just white. Since white is the color of most fleet vehicle it just screams cheap to me.

    One way to break away from these dull, lifeless grey tones is finding a tinted version of them. For example gunmetal which can be bronze (warm tone) or steel blue (cool tone). Infiniti makes a color called Hagane Blue that pulls this off nicely. The color is silver but has just enough blue to catch your eye.

  • avatar
    quaquaqua

    I’d rather have white than black (so unforgiving with paint imperfections), and while I agree that most modern cars don’t look great in silver, the ones with a lot of black accents look great. Plus it hides dirt better than pretty much everything else except Buick Beige.

    Personally, I have a red Mazda6 and I’ve gotten a lot of compliments on it. I’ve also got hit 5 times in 3 years so apparently red is invisible. Who knew?

  • avatar
    randy in rocklin

    I think I have full spectrum….white MR2, green MR2 Spyder, Amethyst 87 Supra ,
    Midnite Blue, 87 Supra turbo, burgundy Avalon, blue Acura CL, grey Acura TL. luv ’em all…lol

  • avatar
    volvo

    Living in sunny California My choice is white or silver with grey or beige interior. At lower in the model range for many makes black is sometimes the only interior choice especially if you look at a sporty model like a Civic Si. The lighter colors are much cooler on hot days.

  • avatar
    AdamOfAus

    Love the titanium silver finish on my E39. Hides scratches and dust real well and suits the understated body shape.

  • avatar
    pathfinderdoorhandle

    Throughout the ’70s, among other rides, I owned two BMW 2002s, a brand-new ’71 and, later, a five year-old ’73. Both were painted pumpkin orange, a hue that the company called Colorado. They also had another, darker orange named Inka, as well as a nearly-fluorescent yellow called Golf. Other shades included metallic lime green, non-metallic mint green, a couple of solid greens, (Agave was one), a maroon called Malaga, at least two shades of tan, several blues of various saturations, a metallic brown, Polaris (silver) and Fjord (light blue metallic). Want to know what the unicorn was back when BMW was establishing its North American beachhead during that era? BLACK! In fact, people would come from all over the BMWCCA’s New England birthplace to Circle Tire in Natick, Massachusetts, to see Michel Potheau’s Schwartz 2002. They literally wouldn’t believe that a black BMW existed until they saw one with their own eyes!

    And yes, I chose Colorado on purpose, factory-ordered the first time and the result of a long, pre-Internet search the second. Because I was an art student? I dunno.

    I’ve spoken with younger folks who find cars painted an actual color to be tacky, bordering on vulgar. Times have certainly changed.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I like silver because it hides the dirt better and in most vehicles it makes them look more expensive especially trucks. I have a black truck with a black interior and I echo many of the comments above–when clean it is a thing of beauty but keeping it clean and dust free is a chore and because of that I will take white over black. Never black again. I like beige or light gold and the Mazda Red reminds me a lot of the Toreador Red on my wife 2000 Taurus which was beautiful with its tan leather interior.

  • avatar
    tily

    I use to get pewter or gray but ever since I had my 2002 Aurora in white diamond tricoat, I prefer some variation of white. I currently have a Buick in white frost tricoat, prior to that a KIA in White Sand Beige and a Chrysler 300 in cool vanilla color

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Don’t look at me, I bought a shade of maroon called Rioja Red.

    I was very annoyed when my wife’s Terrain was “Ebony Twilight” or as I say: “Extra Cost Black.”

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    With color, buy what you like but sadly most modern colors are as exciting as watching, uh, paint dry. I positively loath white on cars – I just can’t figure out why is so popular. Then again, I’m happy to have only 6% of the production of my car in the same color.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    People don’t get to choose the color, the dealer does. The dealer wants the least number possible and colors that everyone will buy, not what they really want. We make fun of Henry Ford saying “any color they want, as long as it’s black”, but that mentality is alive and well. My ’65 Corvair had 17 color choices and six for the interior. The good old days.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Well the big difference is that back when your Corvair was new it was the norm to order the car to your preference. So the dealer wasn’t going to get stuck with the odd colors. Sure the dealers had inventory in stock for immediate delivery and the bulk of those cars were in “safe” colors with the most common options. Now everyone wants to drive home today in that new car and the discounts and rebates are often tied to “must take delivery from dealer stock” or one that GM has done a lot and FCA some “xx% off (fill in model)’s in stock the longest”.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      You’re correct. Some dealers buy almost every vehicle on the lot in sliver, grey, white, or black. When we went to an FCA dealer to pick up my friend’s 2019 Ram Rebel, there were only two vehicles on the smallish lot that had any real color to them, a blue Challenger and my friend’s truck. In the showroom, they had a red 300, everything else was sliver, white, or black. We said something about it to the salesman who was writing up my friend’s truck, and he said they just do trades for “cars with color” when they need to, and almost never order anything with real color. Back when I started looking for cars in spring of 2018, I had a hell of a time finding a Challenger Scat Pack locally in a decent color without a sunroof. About 60 miles away in the Detroit area, they had dozens of them, so my car came from a dealership about 85 miles away, Szott M59. They had Scat Pack Challengers, optioned perfectly in every color but Yellow Jacket. When a search for a correctly optioned Yellow Jacket car fell through, I went TorRed, my second choice.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Agree the dealer is the customer and the dealer orders what they believe will sell. My father ordered one of the first Chevy IIs in Sept. 1961 Roman Red with a Red interior which my mother chose. The dealer didn’t want to order a red car with a red interior but after it came in there were several customers that saw it, loved the color combination, and ordered the same thing. As 65corvair said 17 color choices and six interior, the good old days. Those days will never be seen again now it’s black or gray and few offer tan interiors.

    My wife had a 94 Escort LX wagon which was silver with a slight blue tint with a blue interior which was unique and one of the few I ever saw like that. As soon as she test drove the car which had a 5 speed manual she wanted that car with the blue tint and blue interior. I like the tinted colors like that with a trace of color which breaks the monotony. I also had a 99 Chevy S-10 which was Pewter color that I really liked–easy color to take care of and just different enough from just silver or just beige.

  • avatar
    erik.vornoff

    The overwhelming popularity of white, black and grey — you see it in every parking lot — signifies to me a total capitulation to conformity….it’s even reflected in the dull-colored clothing we wear. We are unwilling or unable to step out in big, bright, bold colors…so we just go for white, black or grey.

  • avatar
    Add Lightness

    I am so tired of Black – White or something in between.
    I think dealers are afraid of actual colours because they may have to sell them at end of lease so order mainstream monochromatic.

    BTW, I love the fabulous current Mazda red.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    I’d put grey at the bottom of my list just under silver and fleet white.

    When looking for my last front line vehicle I didn’t even click on the listings for those in silver or grey. I did end up with white, but a pearl white, because that was the only one I found after extensive searching that had all the other right equipment and was priced right.

    The last front line car for my wife there was one and only one color that repeatedly said she liked while driving in her silver car. So that was the only color I looked for and actually got lucky and found one with the right equipment pretty quickly.

    The last car I purchased was blue and that was the main reason I bought it. I already had a stock Marauder in the most common color, black, So when I found the rarest color in mildly modded daily driver condition I had to bring it home.

    • 0 avatar
      macmcmacmac

      My BIL just got a CX5 with a shade of red that was going to be a $450 extra cost option. This was not mentioned until it was time to sign. He looked at the salesman and and said he had been in sales for 30 years, it was the end of the month and he knew he had to make hay with winter coming on, and there was no way in hell he was paying $450 for red paint.

      He didn’t.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        In Mazda’s defense there are lots of colors that GM sells that are $800 to $1000 options.

        That Mazda Soul Red is done so well that a Miata wearing Soul Red compared to a Miata wearing the most basic shade of white is THIRTEEN POUNDS heavier just by being painted Soul Red.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          GM’s Laguna Blue Tricoat on my C7 was $995 when new. Lime Rock Green Metallic was $495 and only offered for one year. It wasn’t popular (of course) but looks great with the tan interior.

          That Mazda red is beautiful – its hard to imagine there is enough surface area on a Miata to fit 13 lbs of paint – seriously impressive paint job for sure!

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @JMII – one of the racing schools that uses Miata’s told Mazda that they refused to take delivery of any Soul Red cars because of the weight difference. :-P

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            I think I read about those Mazdas. I believe someone was also selling turnkey Miata race cars, but only in white, the lightest color.

  • avatar

    My first car was white (in Russia) and last car is blue. My first car in US was emerald green (what a rarity!) but if was used 6 years old. My first new car in US was beige – yes because I was from Russia and in Russia beige/brown had associations with premium car (e.g. beige Maxima was considered a premium car). In Russia I also had beige/brown Toyota.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I like that Mazda Red as well.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    I want a Charger R/T Scat Pack SEDAN in F8 Green! If it offered a manual I’d get that also. Over/under on the colour or even model being cancelled before I can get one later next year?

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    I was ecstatic when I found my truck in a beautiful shade of brown. It’s a rich deep color that really shines when clean. So happy with it. It makes my truck, of which their are hundreds of thousands of on the road, stand out just a little since it was such a rare color that year. No more blah bland dull colors for me. American is so boring when it comes to car colors. Also, we need to bring back more greens. Always happy to see a green color pop up on a new car.

  • avatar
    MidLifeCelica

    So it’s not just me, I see other posters have noticed it too. Every time I see a red Mazda my head swivels to follow it. I stop and look at them in parking lots while my wife rolls her eyes. There is something about that paint that just grabs my attention…so much so that it makes me want to own a Mazda just so I can look out the window at it every day. Well played, Mazda…well played.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Colors of the cars I’ve chosen, in the order that I’ve owned them:

    Yellow
    Black
    Red
    Blue
    Green
    Gray

    The only repeat was a green 240Z that my father picked up for me to drive because he didn’t like my yellow Opel. It was a dark olive green,and the other green car was a pure metallic green.

    About the only currently available colors I haven’t had are white and silver. If I want to avoid repeating myself it will have to be one of those two, unless the market swings towards other colors.

  • avatar
    brettc

    White isn’t even it’s a colour, it’s a lack of it! Dealers just order bland vehicles because they know they’ll sell quickly and not turn into lot poison like a pink Windstar.

    I don’t think I’d own another white car due to the problem with keeping a white car free of rail/iron dust. The white cars I’ve had were due to it being the available colour at the time, so I took it because that was it for options at that particular price.

    I really like the green on my C-Max and now look for other green cars on the road. The current GM greens are nice (especially on the Equinox) and I also like the Green Envy Metallic that I see on some Fiestas. Ford also has a unique green called Bohai Bay Mint but I haven’t seen too many of them in that colour.

    I also like the Jalapeno Orange that VW is offering. Unique colours, but not for everyone.

    • 0 avatar
      285exp

      White isn’t a lack of colors, it’s a combination of all of them.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        Depends on what you’re talking about, pigment or light waves.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          I teach color theory. White is all colors. White pigment reflects all colors, where as white light contains all visible wavelengths. Black pigment absorbs all color and reflects nothing. Black is the absence of light in the additive color space.

          With all that said – white and black are still “colors” because they are almost never pure and thus become just one shade in a near infinite range of grey. Also one can argue that since white reflects all colors it contains no specific color and could be considered colorless itself. We always have fun with this discussion in my class.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      What, a green C-Max? I would have bought that instead! You must not live in the USA.

      I reluctantly chose the Platinum White Tri-coat. Already we owned a silver C-Max, and I despise black and gray cars. The blue and red colors were hard to judge- when I spotted one (rarely). These highly prismatic paints react so much to sun angle that they can look way different in sun and shade. Usually the red looked like a bruise, and the blue looked black. Anyway, I couldn’t find a red or blue car without the black interior, which is a no-no here in the Sunbelt.

  • avatar
    285exp

    In sequence of ownership:

    Red
    Gold
    Red
    Blue
    Silver
    Blue
    Green
    Green
    White
    Black
    Green
    Silver
    Gold
    Gray
    Green

    Totals:

    4 Green
    3 Gold
    2 Blue
    2 Red
    1 White
    1 Black
    1 Gray

    Looks like I’m in the unusual tastes group.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    I hate bland colors (Silver, White) in cars and try to avoid getting one if I can help it. In my car-owning career, I’ve only owned one silver and 2 & 1/2 white (See 56 Chevy below) cars.
    Even the silver car only spent half of its life burdened with that color. A natural gas line erupted near where my car was parked and showered it rocks with debris. I was able to get repainted a beautiful shade of metallic dark blue.
    1. 69 VW Fastback – Blue
    2. 81 Dodge Colt – Silver. Then Blue
    3. 56 Chevy 210 – Two-tone, Red & White
    4. 89 Pontiac Grand Am – Blue
    5. 93 Geo Prizm – Gary-ish. Maybe dark Taupe.
    6. 2000 – Dodge Grand Caravan – Forest Green
    7. 03 Toyota Matrix – Blue
    8. 06 Suzuki Grand Vitara – White
    9. 13 Chevy Volt – Red
    10. 14 Kia Soul – Kale Green
    11. 15 Chevy Spark EV – White
    12. 18 Chevy Volt – Gray (Satin Steel to be exact)
    13. 17 Buick Lacrosse – Red

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Yuck, white isn’t even a colour!

    It makes most cars look like eggs and SUV’s like refridgerators. It screams Utility Company Fleet Vehicle. Kudos to VW for still offering the colour spectrum option on the e-Golf with over 40 colours. Hopefully it will come back for the R line.
    https://www.autoblog.com/2018/08/15/2019-vw-golf-r-us-gets-40-spektrum-colors/#slide-1318121

    • 0 avatar
      DedBull

      That program was a disaster, with only 250 cars slated to be built, orders cancelled months after down payments, and almost no communication. I think the program could be very successful, but the execution was poor.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      My wife had a Volvo C30 which came in 18 colors. Which included 3 blues, a gold and a green. It was original designed to compete with the Mini (2 door, premium hatchback) which was offered in multiple color combinations.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Today’s car color story – last night I flew into Savannah Georgia. Walk up to the Hertz counter and they give me a choice – “would you like a white or black Camaro”. Agent knew nothing other than the color. Uh, I’ll take the white one? Was the right choice – the black one was a base V6, as it turns out – the white one is a fully loaded 455hp SS. :-)

    I think it would be fast if it had any traction.

  • avatar
    BrakingisanAdmissionofDefeat

    Long live Lava Orange!

    • 0 avatar
      bluetick

      I really like my Lava Orange car. It was a low mileage CPO purchase at a very good price. I would probably be just as happy with it if it were Miami Blue though. Both are such great colors.

  • avatar
    DedBull

    When an insurance total pushed us into new car shopping, my wife immediately fell in love with the habanero orange Tiguan on the lot at our VW dealer. The car was new off the transporter, still with the shipping plastic on. We were coming out of a blue Outlander Sport, no bland colors for us. My wife likes to stand out, and even complains when she sees another orange Tiguan, jokingly saying someone has “her” car.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    I’ve owned red (Metro), dark green (Toyota p/u), brown-over-tan two-tone (Mercedes), white (current SuperDuty), dark blue (Corolla), and metallic brown (XC70).

    I loved the two-tone, still love green and brown.

    The dark blue in question was boring Toyota dark blue; I’d prefer a sky-blue like the ’80s had.

    (And a reminder – you can get an Audi or BMW in any color you want, last I checked.

    You just have to pay a lot for the privilege and wait months.)

  • avatar

    Well, consumers don’t buy cars, dealers do…so we get blah, bland, and silver, blue silver and grey silver. If you want an actual color, you have to order and wait. My Emerald Green car is very pretty, and a one year only unicorn….I had a SAAB in Maletite Green, and a Jeep Cherokee in Forest Green. I regret not getting my MDX in Dark Blue, or there was a one year only green.

    Go to the VW Germany or England websites. The middle class Golf can be had an a variety of interesting colors. It makes one sad, but they custom order. (Imagine a world where the car maker isn’t beating up on the dealer to “take 20 Sentras and we’ll give you three GT-R’s” or some such nonsense.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    – I like the look of red cars, but red paint tends to fade more quickly than other colors. Red pigment tends to be the most expensive (by far) for the OEM (cost not price).

    – Black can be beautiful but shows flaws and absorbs heat.

    – Early “tri-coat” OEM paint jobs went through a true three-coat process (base + tint + clear) [some cycled through the paint shop twice]. More recent “pearl” or “premium” paints are typically two-step, but do cost the manufacturer more than a “standard” paint.

    – Pearl white can look very different than fleet white.

    – In Brazil, cars are ridiculously expensive, and an “unusual” color can *significantly* affect the resale value. So you tend to see a very limited color palette there.

    – Was once told that a particular shade of Cadillac was labeled “no sale blue” at the auctions.

    – In the US, the current dealer ordering model pretty much guarantees bland colors for the most part, as others have pointed out.

    – Some say red vehicles are more likely to be ticketed. Some say silver/gray are more likely to not be visible to other drivers (and thus get hit).

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Simple the auto manufactures could copy most appliance manufacturers offering white, black, and stainless (silver) and black or gray interior. Since most vehicles are considered appliances then offer the same color choices.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    Since 1974, when I bought my first car, I’ve had 3 silver cars, 5 bright red cars, a yellow truck, 2 blue cars, 2 maroon cars, and one black one. Never white, beige/brown (Shudder), or green. I’m done with silver, I got tired of it almost as soon as I got it every time. I don’t like “weak” colors on cars. My present Challenger R/T Scat Pack is TorRed. If FCA put Petty Blue on a new car, I would be tempted to trade it early. I probably wouldn’t, but I would be tempted…

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  • Arthur Dailey: Dislike that new one. Am ambivalent about the old one, but prefer it to this proposed new one.
  • Arthur Dailey: Worse than the people who conducted 9-11 or the recent shooting at the Pensacola Naval Station? Or who...
  • JMII: I have no horse in this race… just reporting my C7 Z51’s best mileage to date is 33 MPG (50 mile...
  • Jeff S: I took one look at this and I thought Buick Encore. Offer a turbo I3 with a CVT and you have the new Buick...
  • dal20402: That’s a big improvement. The current Kia logo screams “dollar store.” Now they have to...

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