By on November 7, 2019

China’s new vehicle market may not be as hot as it once was, but it’s still big. Very big. And pickup trucks, hungrily gobbled up by fleet operators, are a less volatile segment to do business in.

That’s why Ford’s mulling, for the first time, the idea of building Ford-branded trucks inside the country, rather than just importing them. However, before the automaker signs off on such an effort, China will have to do its part.

As reported by Reuters, Ford’s appearance this week at the China International Import Expo (CIIE) brought with it the possibility of local production, but only if Chinese cities become more receptive to allowing pickups in their city centers.

Several major cities in the vastly polluted country ban the use of such vehicles in their urban cores, giving U.S. automakers cold feet on the issue. The situation is evolving, though. Some cities have relaxed their once-rigid laws, with others poised to follow. That, plus the growing appetite for pickups among the Chinese citizenry, has American OEMS salivating over the possibility of boosted market share and boffo overseas profits.

Hoping to capture more buyers, Ford decided to overhaul its presence in the country via the formation of a standalone business unit (Ford China) in October 2018.

“If more areas relax restrictions on pickup trucks, we will plan to locally manufacture Ford-branded pickup trucks in China to meet the demands of Chinese consumers with considerations of the market situation,” Joseph Liu, Ford’s China vice president for product innovation, told Reuters.

Nothing was said about which pickups would enter production, or how those models would be configured. Chinese buyers aren’t very interested in towing, for example, and spaces are tighter in the country’s cities. All Liu would say is that home-built trucks would differ from models it imports from the U.S.

Currently, Ford supplies tech to its Chinese partner JMC, which builds a line of Yuhu-badged pickups.

Despite a 37.7-percent drop in sales in the third quarter of 2019, Ford claims its pickups are growing in popularity. Volume is still low, but combined sales of the Ranger and F-150 Raptor rose 29 percent in Q3 compared to the same period in 2018. Year to date, Ford-badged truck sales are up 60 percent.

[Image: Ford]

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66 Comments on “Ford Eyeing Blue Oval Trucks Built in China...”


  • avatar
    JimC2

    I’d be more worried about intellectual property protection.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I am too, but it’s not like an F-150 is a piece of bleeding-edge military equipment that would take a major spy operation to procure – if China’s really interested in stealing F-150 technology, all it has to do is have someone walk into a Ford dealer and buy one.

      By the same token, any piece of Chinese-made equipment that’s available to the general public here could be reverse-engineered by a U.S. firm.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        Industrial IP is 1% product and 99% the process to mass produce it.

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          ^^^ Yup

          Anybody can figure out how to build a ripoff F-150. Figuring out how to do it cheaply is the trick and copying somebody else’s ideas on how to do it cheaply is easier than figuring it out on your own.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yeah in theory. But besides simpler/expensive cars (that many don’t care how reliable) , aren’t there millions of other things from a million categories that would be exponentially more profitable (than vehicles), immediate return on investment, as long as they’re ripping off a trademark?

            Ford/GM/Ram make it look too easy, but they’re cranking out several million copies for each generation, share platforms (SUV)s, engines, major parts, etc, and it may take a couple million sales of each pickup before making an ounce of profit.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I think China figured out “industrial processes” a long time ago, and I don’t think there’s some magic fairy dust involved in making a F-150 special. It’s a truck.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            When Toyota and Nissan can’t build a better 1/2 ton, let alone competitive… It’s not that they can’t (try), but it would take a tremendous investment that they may not get back.

            To do it right, it’s complicated, and a gamble, even for a Chinese ripoff.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    “That, plus the growing appetite for pickups among the Chinese citizenry, has American OEMS salivating over the possibility of boosted market share and boffo overseas profits”

    Impossible. I have read hundreds of times on these very forums that US Pickups are substandard, too big, and would be shunned by the rest of the world. It has to be true…BAFO said so.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      This is about Ford salivating over assembling CKD trucks in the US. JMC Yuhus are already Chinese made Ford trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      “ Impossible. I have read hundreds of times on these very forums that US Pickups are substandard, too big, and would be shunned by the rest of the world. It has to be true…BAFO said so.”

      +1
      You mean the rest of the world isn’t exactly like a couple European cities that cannot afford to bring their roads into the 21st century?

      • 0 avatar
        Steve203

        >>Impossible. I have read hundreds of times on these very forums that US Pickups are substandard, too big, and would be shunned by the rest of the world. It has to be true…BAFO said so.<<

        Ford can offer the Ranger in China, as it does in other global markets.

      • 0 avatar
        Lokki

        You and Art got too excited and quit reading the article too soon.

        “ Nothing was said about which pickups would enter production, or how those models would be configured. Chinese buyers aren’t very interested in towing, for example, and spaces are tighter in the country’s cities. All Liu would say is that home-built trucks would differ from models it imports from the U.S.”

        These Chinese built trucks would almost certainly -not- be anything like an F150; in fact the only common parts would probably be the Ford badge.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      This is certainly not going to be the F-150. It will presumably be the Ranger and something smaller than the Ranger.

      No place in the world except North America and Australia has urban roads that are comfortable if you are driving an 80″ wide vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Guitar man

      The issue is not emission or fuel consumption – Chinese EC standards are lower than the US anyway.

      There are width and weight restrictions on vehicles in China. Yes, they have trucks and that but they are restricted in the roads they can use.

      Any Ford badged truck is likely to be a version of the Thai-built Ranger, which is a bit narrower than that made in the US. The JMC Vigus is made under an Isuzu licence, they are completely unrelated to Ford.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        American-width trucks and seats may yet be popular in China… obesity rates there are anything from about 5-20%, about what it was in the United States in the 1980s, but they’re catching up fast!

  • avatar
    Steve203

    Makes sense, as Ford is increasingly disinterested in producing any passenger cars at all. Additionally, Ford’s car sales in China have been crashing for a couple years, so they have plenty if idle capacity.

  • avatar
    NoID

    Ford F-150: American as Fortune Cookie.

  • avatar
    Robbie

    It would take an act of complete insanity to allow US-style gas guzzling mega polluting pickups into Chinese urban areas. However, China’s countryside is a totally different matter.
    We have to also realize that the world does pretty well without pickups, and that pickup trucks are mostly a US fashion phenomenon. A van typically does the job better.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      “ gas guzzling mega polluting pickups”

      Do you have evidence to support this? My full-size American 4 door V8 W/T pickup I drive achieves 24-25 HWY that has dipped into the 30MPG area a couple times.

      These aren’t Volkswagen diesels so where you got the idea they were mega polluting I’m interested in hearing.

      There is a 100% chance that the air in a Chinese city entering the intake of any FS American pickup leaves the exhaust cleaner than it entered the engine.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      “A van typically does the job better”

      LOLOLOLOLOL! From what vast vocational experience does this conclusion come from? Or did you reach this conclusion by analyzing some data or reading a few articles from behind a computer? Maybe even reading an article from “Equipment Contractor Quarterly”?

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “A van typically does the job better”

        Depends on the job.

        If you require a more secure and dry cargo area then a van is more appropriate. I don’t see pickups used by electrical, plumbing, gas-fitter type contractors. Pickups are better for odd sized cargoes or loose or malodorous cargoes since the cargo box is open and separate from the passenger compartment.
        Even with that being said, a flat bed style deck is often better than a pickup box because fleet vehicles in the hands of multiple operators tend to get beat up pretty badly.
        I do suspect that when Ford talks about pickups in China they would be looking at the Ranger for lighter work and perhaps the F350/450 models for heavier use. The F150 next to the Ranger in those parts of the world doesn’t make much sense.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Yada yada Aussie way is better yada yada.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      A global F-150 would have locally sourced engines, probably a tiny diesel the locals are very familiar with. They’re already warming up to midsizers and 1/2 tons are the next logical step.

      Fullsize pickups aren’t something they’re used to, but baby steps. Globally, work trucks don’t normally blur any lines, shouldn’t be versatile, nor offer any kind of variety. There’s not one corner of the world where US fullsize (grey market) pickups can’t be found in tiny numbers but highly coveted.

    • 0 avatar
      AdamOfAus

      Australia may not be a big car market but our top 3 sale spots are occupied by pick ups.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    If Hilux is selling well, I’m sure Ford can come up with something similar instead of the more comfort oriented US pickup (or Tacoma equivalent).

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If the Chicken Tax is ever repealed then Ford, GM, and Ram will start making their pickups in China and exporting them to the US and Canada. I could see that happening especially with the cost of manufacturing. I doubt there would be a huge market for full size pickups in China but the mid sized trucks might do well. The cost savings would be significant for the Big 2 and 1/2 to manufacture in China even after shipping costs.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Jeff S – Canada doesn’t have a “chicken tax”. We do have a tax on the books that applies to non-trade agreement imports which applies to all vehicles. Our market is too small on its own so we tend to get lumped in with the USA market. We occasionally get vehicles or specs that aren’t available in the USA .

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    CHINA IS 100x THE THREAT TO THE U.S.A THAT THE USSR EVER WAS!

    There has to be a moment of clarity here: China has grown its real economy since trade “liberalization” in 2000 (U.S. Granting full-scale Most Favored Nation trade status to China) by 4x.

    Think about that; China, in 19 years, has an economy, in real terms, that is 400% larger today than it was 19 years ago, with Chinese GDP purchasing power per capita rising from $4,000 to over $16,000 USD. Had the U.S. Economy grown at a similar, real rate over those 19 years, U.S. GDP purchasing power parity per capita rose from $39,000 to $59,300 (had U.S. GDP ppp per capita matched China’s over this period, 2019 U.S. GDP ppp per capita would now be $237,200, not $59,300).

    That’s a rocket fuel powered trajectory in China.

    Okay, China has slowed somewhat, and it’s rate of fantastically outsize economic growth was partly due to productivity growth (helped by stealing western nations’ and western corporations’ IP on a massive, historically unparalleled scale AS A RESULT OF TRADE “LIBERALIZATION,” aka “free trade” – not free or fair or reciprocal) that rose from a very low base, and Chinese domestic governmental stimulus and infrastructure policies.

    The relevant point here is that it’s not exactly a secret that China has openly hostile intermediate and long-term intentions towards the U.S., E.U., Japan, South Korea and is building its own entourage of increasingly economically powerful allies (and also fiefdoms such as Australia), and the soon to be largest economy in the world by the measure if either GDP or GNP will be China, likely by 2027, barring some sort of internal catastrophe.

    China’s intentions and goals are not even semi-secretive; their officials talk openly about their long-term plan to become the hegemonic global superpower.

    Given China’s values, the way its government treats its own majority people, let along domestic or religious minority groups, the policies it has towards freedom of religion, press, association, assembly, expression, family planning, or any even remotely semblance of liberty and independence (at the individual, family, city or provincial level – look at Hong Kong right now), why aren’t alarm bells ringing in the U.S. and every relatively free European or other nation?

    It’s because politicians in the U.S. and European nations are for sale, literally. They no longer have any inherent interest other than becoming elected, then trying to win re-election over the short term, and then rotating out as a lobbyist for a foreign entity of nation (like China), because our new religion is how much $$$ we can gather for the individual, short-term, without any sense of allegiance or loyalty to our own nations or any determination to stave off real, very powerful, well organized, enemies having a well-designed, long term plan to literally destroy us.

    Will this change, and if so, when, and what will cause any change?

    Those who think the short or even longer term economic costs of absolutely boycotting Chinese goods, services and engaging in an absolute and complete strategy to at least neuter China (particularly in the military and warfare area, by preventing the theft and development of increasingly sophisticated technology having military applications), while it’s still possible, bringing a large swath of allies (present and to be won over) with us in this all-out effort, are not worth it or can’t be withstood, fail to remember the most basic and frequent lessons of human history.

    CHINA MUST BE CONTAINED IN PEACETIME, WHILE IT’S STILL POSSIBLE, OR WE WILL VERY DEARLY REGRET IT. FOREVER, AND OUR CHILDREN AND THEIR CHILDREN WILL CURSE US, ASSUMING THEY ARE ALLOWED TO LEARN THIS COURSE OF RECENT HISTORY, AND HOW IT ALL WENT DOWN – THE BIG CASH-GRAB SELL-OUT.

    • 0 avatar
      puddleJumper

      Spot on.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        DW, I fear we’ve already lost. Major US corporations already bend at the will of the Chinese government and the general population “votes” every day by consuming large quantities of goods sold here that are made in China. As a collective, we’ve been in the slow-to-boil pot too long and now it’s too late to realize we’ve been cooked. The massive wealth, technology and IP transfer (theft) is probably irreversible, even if we had the stones to really stand up to China, which we clearly don’t. Tariffs will be dropped, insane trade imbalances will continue and the rest of the world will slowly conform, fed by Chinese-funded “opportunities” that come at exorbitant consequences. We’ve allowed this to happen (all of us, the politicians, business leaders and general public) and I don’t see any of the three parties just mentioned ever having the ability to reverse course, grow a backbone and suffer the short-term pain to regain our standing with China.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      One can argue that China not the USA is the perfect capitalistic organism. Human rights and freedoms just get in the way of gaining wealth and power.

      Western countries need to work together instead of bickering and breaking up trade and military alliances.

      Russia even when it was the USSR was never much of a threat. Canada and Australia have larger GDP’s. they were a convenient foil in promoting US lead capitalism around the world.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d be interested in how DW would truly “contain” China without going to war with then. Let’s hear the plan.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Truth, DW. They are a hostile fascist dictatorship. Confront them now economically or you will face them later militarily.

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        DW

        China does not act in the best interest of their citizens. They act in the Chinese government’s best interest. In fact, they want to use the surplus 3,000,000 + men as cannon fodder against other countries.
        Which country???
        Not Canada, japan, australia, germany.
        The real target is the USA.
        Crush them and own the world.

        And with pocahontas as president, she ll be a push over and it ll be game over.

        Oh, she just might win. Once the soros’ of the world crash the economy before the 2020 election. Trump – the last best hope – will lose.

        The next crash will be a la 1929. Worse than 2009 .

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      “It’s because politicians in the U.S. and European nations are for sale, literally. They no longer have any inherent interest other than becoming elected, then trying to win re-election over the short term, and then rotating out as a lobbyist for a foreign entity of nation (like China), because our new religion is how much $$$ we can gather for the individual, short-term, without any sense of allegiance or loyalty to our own nations or any determination to stave off real, very powerful, well organized, enemies having a well-designed, long term plan to literally destroy us.”

      That selfish short sightedness theory is completely true, and also about 800% too optimistic. One of our parties, and the more successful one at that, has as its literal platform that Western civilization doesn’t have the right to exist. China doesn’t have to defeat us. China doesn’t even have to fight us.

      China just has to sit back and watch while we finish drowning ourselves.

      • 0 avatar
        whynotaztec

        Dan you crushed it. The West will fall victim to its unrelenting shortsightedness and its growing population of those who hate its very existence. China or ISIS or any other real or imagined enemy of the US does not need to engage us in battle – just let us continue to destroy ourselves.

    • 0 avatar
      schmitt trigger

      @Deadweight:
      “…why aren’t alarm bells ringing in the U.S. and every relatively free European or other nation?”

      Because, you know, capitalism.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    “Trump – the last best hope – will lose.”

    It was a logical discussion until his name got mentioned.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      You don’t recognize rational.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Well, Trump certainly may be “the last best hope” of Chinese leadership, since his approach has been to yell loudly about China while pulling out of all arrangements that might actually constrain Chinese power in any meaningful way.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @ToddAtlasF1 – I said “logical”. That entails using a systematic approach to determining a course of action. Alienating allies and bailing on trade agreements without a solid plan in place is not logical. A prime example was TPP. TPP was an economic plan to create financial/trade allegiances to hem in China. Alienating NATO partners along with the EU is not logical either. As pointed out by Deadweight, China is a huge economic entity. China is in a position where the USA cannot win against them on their own.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      “ It was a logical discussion until his name got mentioned.”

      Your country just re-elected Trudeau, excuse me if I don’t listen to your definition of “logical”.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Hummer – In Canadian elections, you don’t get to vote for the Prime Minister unless he is running in your electoral district. The party with the most elected representatives gets to run the government. The head of that party becomes Prime Minister.
        If one looks at the Canadian numbers, It breaks down by region. The Conservative party got the votes from the prairies and part of BC. The Liberals got vote rich Ontario and the Maritime’s. The Bloc Quebecois got Quebec. The New Democratic party basically got what was left over.

        The entire election was an exercise in who “we” thought was the least “sh!tty”. Trudeau didn’t deserve another term. Sheer, the head of the Conservatives was “Harper on valium”. Jagmeet Singh would have made a good Prime Minister but the NDP are even more left wing than the Liberals.

        The Liberal party have what is called a “minority” government. They have to work with other parties since a coalition of the opposition parties can vote down anything the Liberals propose. In many respects it is a good outcome since it kills partisan politics.

        I didn’t vote for the Liberals under Justin Trudeau. I’m sure that will probably confuse those who blindly stick to one political party.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          “The entire election was an exercise in who “we” thought was the least “sh!tty”.”

          Soooo, How exactly does this make Canada any different than their Southern neighbor?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Soooo, How exactly does this make Canada any different than their Southern neighbor?”

            Less guns and more free healthcare… LOL

  • avatar
    slavuta

    This will go “really well” with rednecks who buys these

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Lou.BC–True but it would make more sense from a production standpoint if Ford made trucks for export to include Canada as well as the USA. I am not in favor of importing Chinese made Ford pickups but I could see where manufacturers would want to do that with the UAW and with the cost savings. I would also add GM and FCA to that as well not to single out just Ford.

    Agree with most of the comments above about allowing the Chinese to make most of our products and the corporate greed and politicians that are bought. I would also add that we the consumers who were buying Chinese made goods because of the cheaper price but now the prices have become not as cheap. It might be too late to reverse the damage and we have become use to the temperature in that boiling pot which is becoming a little hotter. We might already be cooked.

    As for rednecks many of them are buying Chinese made tools at Harbor Freight.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    “I said “logical”. That entails using a systematic approach to determining a course of action. Alienating allies and bailing on trade agreements without a solid plan in place is not logical. A prime example was TPP. TPP was an economic plan to create financial/trade allegiances to hem in China. Alienating NATO partners along with the EU is not logical either. As pointed out by Deadweight, China is a huge economic entity. China is in a position where the USA cannot win against them on their own.”

    I agree Lou the US needs not to alienate its allies if we are to negotiate a trade deal with China. There is more power in numbers than going it alone. Trump apparently has not heard of “Speak softly and carry a big stick.”

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I travel to China a few times a year, and have been here two weeks. I have seen exactly zero full size pickups. Plenty of Japanese style, cab-over-engine work trucks do the heavy lifting.

    Where these things could be sold, I don’t know. My Beijing based interpreter tells me that it’s very difficult to buy a non-electric vehicle, because the local government is only handing out green license plates (plates have to be purchased before the vehicle, and if you can’t get a plate for an ICE vehicle, no one will sell you one).

    As for fitting a truck down the road, that shouldn’t be a problem. China isn’t Europe. They are constantly knocking down their cities and rebuilding them. Wide roads with many lanes are common. Bike/scooter lanes are wide enough for a Raptor, and separated from the main road. Frankly, Chinese cities are even more car-centric than American ones. And in the smaller cities (think Chicago or smaller, and there are hundreds of these cities), traffic is not a problem.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    We could take a few lessons about rebuilding our own infrastructure from China. It appears that China’s policy is to limit ICE vehicles because of the pollution. I know that China is building a major multi-lane highway system to connect up to Europe. China is planning for the future the US cannot keep up with the present.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      “ It appears that China’s policy is to limit ICE vehicles because of the pollution.”

      Yes no need for those dirty ICE vehicles putting out completely harmless CO2, they build electric vehicles with complete disregard for disregard for the environment putting toxic cadmium and cobalt among others directly into their air and waterways.

      Because that’s apparently the future of progress.

      Meanwhile in the US we can’t figure out which bathroom to use and have half the government concocting new phony impeachment crimes every 2 months, and despite all that we’re still moving at a faster pace than anytime in the past 50 years.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    “Yes no need for those dirty ICE vehicles putting out completely harmless CO2, they build electric vehicles with complete disregard for disregard for the environment putting toxic cadmium and cobalt among others directly into their air and waterways.

    Because that’s apparently the future of progress.”

    So what you are saying is that China does not have a problem with air pollution. I guess this is more of that fake news. As for impeachment not getting political but these problems were happening long before Trump and will continue to happen after he is not President. I doubt asking a foreign leader to conduct an investigation on an American citizen and making that a contingency upon receiving support from the US government is something to brag about and I doubt if it were anyone else but our President that they wouldn’t get by without being punished. I doubt the President will get removed from office but he might get impeached and even if he deserved it it is not anything to celebrate.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Your comment makes no sense

      “ doubt asking a foreign leader to conduct an investigation on an American citizen and making that a contingency upon receiving support from the US government is something to brag about”

      Yes we have audio and video footage of Joe Biden threatening to withhold a Billion dollars from Ukraine if a prosecuter researching his son was not fired. How would that lead to a later Presidents impeachment?

      Up and til now it didn’t seem like Joe Biden would get away for this, so again, this is the last administration that committed these acts, and were not held accountable.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The President is on record for asking for an investigation into Biden for Government support. This is an action not related to protection of the US and the US’s interests it is strictly for Trump’s own benefit. I am not the one impeaching the President but if there is enough proof then it is likely the President will be impeached. To remove a President from office is not the same as impeachment–Clinton was impeached but not removed from office.

    As for ICE versus EV China is the largest vehicle market in the World which means what China does will eventually determine what type of vehicles NA will have. For 2018 there were 28 million new vehicles sold in China, for 2018 17.2 million, and in 2018 over 2 million in Canada. Regardless of your opinion or my opinion China will determine what types of vehicles will be sold in the US. Why do you think most of the automobile manufacturers have plans to make some type of EV? Do you think it is just because they want to? Most automobile companies see a future where it will be harder to make and sell ICE vehicles. The auto manufacturers are in the transportation business not just limited to ICE. Again your opinion or mine is not going to change what the auto industry makes. If you want that new big V-8 Hemi Hellcat you better buy it soon because it will eventually not be available.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      “ The President is on record for asking for an investigation into Biden for Government support.”

      You do realize the entire transcript was released by Trump himself?

      And based off of the Biden video I’m sure Ukraine already has a nice fat file on the Biden family.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        What Trump released was meeting notes, not a transcript. When read aloud, the notes are far shorter than the actual call, even when accounting for translation time.

        Also, the recording of the actual call was moved to a highly classified server, so it’s harder to hear the original.

        Also, several people who were part of the call have testified under oath about what was actually said, and they have indicated that there was a quid quo pro. Nixon went down for less.

        That’s more than enough to keep the investigation going.

        Many of the people who have testified under oath will be testifying publicly next week. If you have any interest in the actual truth of the matter, I suggest you listen to an unfiltered version of what the witnesses actually have to say.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      As well, US will determine US cars as we currently do, we are plenty large enough to make cars that we consume. I would be worried if I were European but America tends to buy what Americans want. That’s why small cars have failed to gain traction over and over.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    meant 17.2 million vehicles sold in the US for 2018. A sizable number but 10 million less than China.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    We will see, but many of the current cars we have in the US market were introduced in China. Trucks are a different story but that could change as well. I am not saying this is a good thing but this has been happening for the last few years. You are assuming that the
    Chinese want the same size vehicles as Europeans which is incorrect. As
    TMA1 has stated the Chinese are building the infrastructure and the size of the vehicles Chinese prefer has little to do with the size of the road, the Chinese have built the bigger roads and the new infrastructure. The US is no longer the No 1 vehicle market in the World. China alone has over 300 million people in the middle class that is a huge market.


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