By on October 11, 2019

Lexus issued a teaser this week and it took a few passes before we could identify it as a vehicle. Initially, your dim-witted author presumed it was some kind of at-home charging solution or wildly modern vacuum cleaner design. Lexus’ tagline wasn’t much help, either. “The Future is Electrified” is boilerplate content for the automotive industry right now — or perhaps some highly contagious corporate tic.

This time it’s being used to preview a new battery electric vehicle Toyota’s luxury arm intends on debuting at the Tokyo Motor Show this month… at least that’s what we’ve been told.

Honestly, it’s still a little difficult to tell. While it seems as though we’re getting a close-up glimpse of the portion surrounding the model’s headlight, there are factors at play that make it hard to feel certain of anything. Is that giant opening supposed to be an air inlet? Where does it lead on this purely electric vehicle? Is this even the car’s front? 

All Lexus has said is that the model is a concept vehicle “leveraging continued advances in technologies such as electrification and autonomous driving.” While not the most original or descriptive copy the industry has churned out over the last few years, it’s not fair to complain about vagaries surrounding an intentionally mysterious car.

We’re not even going to proclaim this as company’s first BEV, as there’s been no production announcement made. If anything, we imagine Lexus wants to use this creation to test a new design theory or signature feature on the public. Touting any future commitments to electrification is just icing on the cake — but we’ll have to wait and see. There’s always a chance this covert concept could be foreshadowing something the automaker actually wants to put into production.

We’ll know more on October 24th after Lexus has pulled the covers off in Japan.

 

[Image: Lexus]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

7 Comments on “Lexus Teaser Appears to Be Showcasing New BEV… Right?...”


  • avatar
    Andre Robinson

    That’s the rear window to the top left, and the tail light to the bottom right. I know the light is white and not red, but leds can change colors.

    I mean, I don’t think that vertical shear cliff face is front of this electric vehicle, which likely prioritizes aerodynamics , but it would work on the rear (kammback). The rings of light in the upper left are likely from the dashboard, as viewed through the rear window.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Yawn. I’m sure it will be another decontented sucky product.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    It’s a Cylon sex toy.

  • avatar
    amca

    Toyota has long been pooh-pooh-ing the idea of BEVs, preferring to stick with its hybrids and hydrogens. This would be a sudden turn-around. But it seems the world is going that way, so maybe they’re giving in.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    In the old days, Styling would come up with angles like that and Stamping would come back with ‘No, you can’t have that’ – because of the severity of the angle or the draw depth or what have you.

    (Not saying the old days were better – the old days had their own problems.)

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    As a concept vehicle, it may have no relevance to production plans, correct?

    It appears that the entire vehicle is shown in miniature in a reflection in the bubbles in the upper left of the still frame. In case anyone cares to see it.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • MRF 95 T-Bird: At one time in the 80’s the family fleet in my folks household ran the gamut from my sisters 77 Toyota...
  • la834: The Chevy 2.8L V6 was considered, and at least one prototype built, but I’m unaware of the Buick 3.8...
  • ToolGuy: And then specific to Nissan’s situation with Titan (conjecture): – If you need a truck you might...
  • ToolGuy: For purposes of this post, assume I know nothing about the automotive industry, not much about pickup...
  • Lorenzo: Biggest was the 472 in a 1968 Coupe De Ville. Second biggest was a 440 in a 1971 New Yorker. The Chrysler...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber