By on September 23, 2019

This could be case of a holster-sniffing wannabe of an exotic variety, or it could be an international incident.

You’re probably aware of folks who like to drive around in former police cruisers carrying as much cop-car equipment as the local officials will let pass without issuing a citation for impersonating a police officer. It’s not a trivial issue to law enforcement because some folks do go over the line into actually impersonating authorities, including committing crimes under cover of fraudulent authority.

What, then, to make of the man arrested by the California Highway Patrol who was driving around Irvine in a black Audi sedan with very authentic-looking decals for China’s People’s Armed Police? It even had an official-looking PAP license plate up front. The PAP is the Chinese paramilitary militia, part the People’s Liberation Army, that is responsible for internal security, riot control, and antiterrorism, as well as some general police work. In China, that is, not California.

CHP’s Santa Ana post put out the following post on Facebook:

CHP responded to several complaints regarding a male Asian driver driving a black Audi in the city of Irvine impersonating the Chinese National Police. The Audi had Chinese Police symbols and the Chinese National Seal. The driver was arrested and charged with impersonating a peace officer and for forging/possessing a fraudulent public seal.

Any person or victim with information regarding this crime is encouraged to contact the California Highway Patrol, Santa Ana Office, at 714-567-6000.

The identity of the driver, who is Asian, was not released. CHP officials told KTLA that they were investigating reports of a second similar-looking vehicle driving around Irvine.

This isn’t the first such arrest in the Golden State. Earlier this summer, police in northern California arrested another Asian driver whose car was marked with Chinese characters, after the person tried to pull over someone who turned out to be an off-duty cop.

Why would someone be driving around a California city trying to look like a Chinese paramilitary militia member? Well, over 40 percent of Irvine’s population is Asian, many of them Chinese natives, with family members in China.

Last month, the Australian Broadcasting Company reported that fake Chinese police cars were seen driving in Perth and Adelaide. The sightings raised concerns about the Chinese government or its supporters possibly trying to intimidate Chinese expatriates in Australia who might have been supporting the ongoing democracy protests in Hong Kong. When officials were able to identify one of the drivers, he said it was a joke. Apparently, it’s only illegal in Australia to impersonate an Australian police officer.

You may have seen photos of some of the PAP’s armored personnel carriers massing just over the border from Hong Kong as protests in that former British Colony have continued.

Black Audis are favored by government officials in China, and the People’s Armed Police, the Te Jing, do drive black vehicles.

If you’ve spent any time online in discussion of China, you may have noticed that there are cadres of Chinese nationalists, and not a few Western apologists for the Chinese Communist Party, eager to rebut anything that’s at all critical of China, the Chinese government, or Xi Jinping, the Chinese dictator. China’s government expresses its “soft power” in many ways.

It’s not outside the realm of possibilities that the man arrested in Irvine is just a Te Jing wannabe, but how would you bet?

[Image: California Highway Patrol, YouTube]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

69 Comments on “Driver Arrested for Impersonating a Chinese Cop… in California; Related to Hong Kong Protests?...”


  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I blame Obama.

    Clearly we need to build a wall along the entire Pacific Ocean coastline, 65,000 feet high. Only then can we be safe.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    California surpasses itself.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Not authentic enough, since it doesn’t have the word “POLICE” under the Chinese characters on the rear door, like in the picture of the real PAP vehicle.

    This is just bizarre, and I’m waiting to hear about the driver that was arrested.

  • avatar

    Meanwhile, Dianne Feinstein is wondering where her motorcade is…

  • avatar
    R Henry

    I used to ride a black and white Kawasaki Police 1000 motorcycle. The bike still had “Police 100” emblems on the side panels. The red and blue lights on the front were changed to yellow. I never had a problem over a number of years riding that thing.

    My loyal steed: https://funkyimg.com/i/2XdzC.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      -Nate

      Yours was newer than mine, I had the last year model that still had a kick starter .

      A fun bike, I re installed the siren and air horns etc. and rode it across America before selling it on .

      -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        I think that must have been ore-1980 or ’81. I had one of those too. Instead of the full fairing, it had a more traditional fork-mounted windshield. The version with full fairing went from 1982 all the way into the early aughts I believe. A dead-reliable drivetrain, but no antilock brake option, which is how BMW was finally able to pry the California CHP business from Kawasaki.

  • avatar
    Sam Hall

    “responded to several complaints?

    O RLY? Who was complaining about this car that has no emergency lights or other police-like accoutrements, isn’t a make or model used by US police agencies, and generally doesn’t resemble any police car used in North America?

    Australia has recently had issues with Chinese government-influenced individuals making complaints against student groups and other organizations that speak out against Chinese repression in Hong Kong and elsewhere. The CHP would do a lot better to look into who their tipsters might have been, than to harass the guy with the stickers on his Audi.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      “This isn’t the first such arrest in the Golden State. Earlier this summer, police in northern California arrested another Asian driver whose car was marked with Chinese characters, after the person tried to pull over someone who turned out to be an off-duty cop.”

      You want them to investigate the tipsters? How does the PROC compensate you?

      • 0 avatar
        Sam Hall

        I think the tipsters are likely paid by the Chinese government to do things like this. It would be good to know that, before our state and federal governments do too much of the PRC’s work for it.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      These are criminals harassing new immigrants by pretending, as a fearful cop from their old countries, yup, the worst of the worst scumbags.

      Imagine people pretending to be NAZI trying to harass Jewish old ladies these days. That’s exactly what’s going on.

    • 0 avatar
      CaddyDaddy

      Sam Hill sits in the basement of the Police Headquarters building in Shenzhen scanning an unrestricted internet service looking for any negative PRCC press and is paid to jump in. “ police – like accoutrements “ wow the thesaurus was really used for that one statement.

      Communist Bot.

      • 0 avatar
        Sam Hall

        Ok, grandpa Simpson. I knew there had to be something up with someone going to the specific trouble of dressing up as a Chinese cop, just (maybe) guessed wrong about why. I stand (most likely) corrected

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Have seen the same model, colour Audi with similar (or the same?) markings/decals in the student parking area at York University in Toronto on a number of occasions during the past few months. However it did have regular Ontario plates.

    I didn’t know what they represented as there are some other high end luxury or exotic cars that park in the same area that have various labels/stickers/wraps including a Range Rover decorated in a ‘Hello Kitty’ motif.

    You may remember that an anti-Chinese government protest in Toronto was disrupted by pro-government supporters who showed up in supercars and drowned out the protesters by revving their engines.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You have to wonder about the motives of the pro-government supporters.

      My money’s on them having to appear supportive to avoid bad stuff happening to their people in the “old country.”

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        If they’re showing up in supercars, they’re probably just content with the status quo, and are completely indifferent to if the status quo is just or not.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        There was an article in the NY Times last week about the class between pro-Beijing and pro-HK students at a university in Sydney. Lots of people quoted for the paper were afraid to give their full names for fear of reprisals against family back home. Some even mentioned family who have already received a visit from the friendly CCP.

        During the 30th anniversary coverage of the Tiananman Square massacre a few months ago, foreign journalists were being harassed in Beijing and civilians were afraid to be interviewed about it on camera. One dude even got angry with the journalist for showing pictures of Tank Man.

        Political oppression is no joke in China. Those people are afraid of their government.

        • 0 avatar
          PandaBear

          Many of the corrupted Chinese officials send their families to Canada (easy to immigrate to if you have money to invest), they then stay back home to make as much money as they can as a “naked officials” with a mistress or two.

          So it make sense that the pro-China group has super cars and the anti-China group doesn’t.

          The protest in Hong Kong is a completely different animal. The aggressive anti-gov protesters are throwing napalm at the cops. Some would even attempt to rob guns and batons from fallen officers.

          https://www.facebook.com/RTHKVNEWS/videos/680078685810217/

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            So much for their social credit, I suppose…

            People do tend to get riled about silly stuff like getting stuck living in an Orwellian police state.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        FreedMike – simple. China is becoming an Empire. And they don’t want to miss being part of it.

        But we need to ask ourselves – do we want these people to be here? Neither those pro or anti gov care much about America. You will see them go back as soon as they feel that they can make more $$ in China. Send all of them back and let them fight this one out on their soil. We have Indians living here for decades and not getting citizenship. Think..

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Well, interesting you’d bring up the “sent back” idea – plenty of Jews like me were “sent back” when they tried to flee the Nazis.

          If my ancestors had been “sent back” to Russia back in the early 1910s, we wouldn’t be having this conversation. They’d have all ended up dead.

          (By the way, I’m gonna take a wild stab and guess your people weren’t Lakota Sioux, and didn’t come over on the Mayflower, either.)

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @FreedMike is correct. Canada sent back Sikh refugees in the early part of the 20th century on the Kamagata Maru, only to see many of them jailed or killed when they returned home.
            In 1919 afraid of the Red Scare the Canadian government changed the rules regarding immigration and deported a large number of immigrants from Russia and Finland (formerly part of Russia) on the basis that they ‘might be Bolshevik sympathizers).
            Both Canada and the USA rejected 937 Jewish refugees on the St Louis in 1939. 254 of them ended up being murdered in camps by the Nazis.

            As for the pro-government supporters in Canada. Most of them are the extremely rich children of major government officials or government approved business owners. Their parents send them to school in North America, and often invest heavily in real estate here. This allows them to move to the front of the line in obtaining Canadian ‘status’. The parent is able to stay in China to make as much money as possible, is able to move much of it to Canada where it is ‘safe’. Canada provides a refuge for the family and their money in the event of a purge, internal political struggle, civil unrest etc.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Good thing my grandfather got out of Russia when he did, Arthur – a few years later, and he might have been stuck there. He was from Belarus; my grandmother was Polish. Both were Jewish. Enough said, really.

            One would think we’d have learned our lesson from rotten episodes like the ones you mention. Apparently not.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Mike,

            I like chatting with you but you have wrong sense of history on this one:

            “If my ancestors had been “sent back” to Russia back in the early 1910s, we wouldn’t be having this conversation. They’d have all ended up dead.”

            Most likely, your ancestors would be fine. Bolshevik revolution would wipe out shtettle borders and your relatives would assimilate into soviet society. Later they would fight Germans in WWII. Then their children/grand children will move to Israel and US. Or nowhere.
            Also, Molotov-Ribbentrop pact that often incorrectly used to snarl at Russia, saved many many Jews. Stalin relocated those from newly acquired territories into Kazakhstan. They complained at first but later realized their luck. And those who lived on soviet territory could leave. But in many cases they just didn’t want to. How could they leave their cow behind?

            My relatives came to US in 1919-20. And my family as we came here, we invested ourselves into America. Look at Chinese lady here. She constantly complaining about Xi but her hubby works in China and only comes to US sometimes

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Art,

            don’t mix cases like “St Louis in 1939” and Russian/Ukrainian/Belorussian Jews.

            Those who lived in Soviet Union had all opportunities to be evacuated into Central Asia and behind Urals. Jews were also integral part of Soviet Army. Nearly 1 million fought Germans.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Slavuta:
            Ah, so all my ancestors had to do was sit it out…in Poland, where 90% of Jews ended up dead, and Belarus, where 66% of Jews ended up dead, and they’d have “been fine.” All good.

            Crack a history book sometime, friend.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Mike,
            if your relatives were in the areas of Poland that came under Soviet control, there would be excellent chance for them to survive. Read on Stalin’s Jews. And in Belarus, problem was that soviet leadership thought/or just told, they are going to repel Germans quickly. So they didn’t spent much effort of evacuating people, especially Jews. Those who picked themselves, left everything behind and got moving, saved themselves. Those who believed gov. propaganda perished.
            But you’re talking 1910. In 1910, In the Russian Empire, Jews were not allowed to live in the city and they had no mobility. But with revolution, many started moving into cities, and moved on. I guess what I am saying, there is a great chance that your family wouldn’t even be in Belarus by 1941. BTW, ~10K Jews fought Germans behind enemy lines in Belarus’s resistance.

          • 0 avatar

            Getting “sent back” was not an uncommon occurance during the years of massive European immigration to the U.S. in the late 19th and early 20th century. My great uncle had some kind of eye issue that resulted in him not making it past Ellis Island on his first try. Also, I’ve read that 1/3rd of Jewish immigrants to the U.S. at the turn of the 20th century returned to Europe voluntarily.

            Of course, the events post-1933 were completely different.

            As an aside, Emil Fackenheim, the Jewish philosopher, escaped Germany with his family, to Canada, where, as German nationals they were interred in an “Enemy Aliens” camp with some actual Nazis. The camp was in the maritime provinces, where the locals eat a lot of bacon and pork. Fackenheim kept a kosher diet so his only choice was often salmon, breakfast, lunch, and dinner. After the war he never ate salmon again.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            My maternal grandfather lost all of his family. Yet was locked up for a number of months in Canada as an ‘enemy alien’. In the same camp(s) as German POW’s.

            As a result of his incarceration, his family lost their house.

        • 0 avatar
          PandaBear

          “My relatives came to US in 1919-20. And my family as we came here, we invested ourselves into America.”

          No you didn’t, you got lucky and made it.

          Anyone you bitch about could work just as hard or even harder than “your relatives and your families” but now it is your turn to shut the door on them because, oh look at you, you are in charge and you can decide who is and isn’t American now.

          We’ve done that to the Blacks and Native Americans, let’s do that to the Chinese and Middle Eastern now.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            I agree with last part of your last sentence – … let’s do that to the Chinese and Middle Eastern now.

            Chinese spies and terrorists not needed here.

  • avatar
    racerviii

    Chinese ex-patriot?? You mean expatriate. Smh.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    Can’t wait for the follow up article about the lawsuit that will occur, and then the follow up to the follow up where it is quietly settled.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    How do you say “wacker” in Mandarin?

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2017/11/no-fixed-abode-wacker/

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I wouldn’t care if these were antique police vehicles with a history behind them, but wrapping up some current era car in another countries protective services (police that in China at least strikes fear in its citizens) should really put on trial that individuals allegiance. There’s no reason for America to harbor an individual that holds allegiance to another countries government.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Don’t blow this out of proportion. People put noses, antlers, eye lashes, confederate symbols, what not, on their cars. This dude put some Chinese symbols. But he didn’t put “Police” on it as real Chinese police has it. So, it is a prank.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        But who is getting pranked here? The Chinese individuals that escaped China to come here probably don’t see this as funny.
        Frankly it may even be intimidating.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          “Chinese individuals that escaped China”

          you’re out of touch with reality. You think, China is THAT evil. Small evil, not THAT big of evil. Sure, China will chase you if you break the law. And this is most often the scenario. But mostly, China will try to send them here for all levels of spying.

          Who is pranked? – inter-Chinese stuff. Definitely not police.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Unless your implying that no citizen can ever truly escape China, then you will need to explain. The country has re-education camps for those that don’t do as they are told. They have a social credit system for ranking citizens based on their actions and beliefs on the ruling party. They will arrest anyone if they suspect you are talking against the ruling party. During the Tiananmen square anniversary a CBS journalist was arrested for asking a citizen a question regarding the incident and held for several hours.
            Sure they aren’t killing foreigners, but where are you drawing the line on evil? We know there are Chinese spies in America with ears and possibly mouths close to American elected officials. We know they have stole American technology and secrets.

            Yet we shouldn’t be worried? Please enlighten me.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            You’re trying to argue that Jews who would have stayed behind in western Russia would “have been fine” during the Holocaust, Hummer. Not much point, if you ask me.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            There have been multiple attempts at gaining worldly influence over the past 100 years, by many groups of people generally with bad motives.

            As much as America (and the world) dislikes being what we are called the “World Police”, the world has maintained relative stability and wars are not as common as they once were, American influence has been a positive.

            Axis powers, USSR, radical Jihadi groups, have all made serious attempts to gain influence, and none of them were looking out for democracy or personal liberties in the process. China is no different in that they wish to assert there own influence, what’s different, instead of using war or the threat of war, China is using technology and economic force to gain influence.

            To overlook China is to ignore history.

            While flawed, and generally disliked, American influence is the best the world has to offer, I think the reason for that is because America generally doesn’t want to be the world police. China is vying hard for that position and *do* want to be the world police which should concern many people.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            As Mike is saying, standing in the way of a countries forced assertion to influence is dangerous if your not on the correct end of the path to their ascension. Denying that is denying history.

            The individuals driving these Chinese look alike police cars are terrorizing people. Imagine if in 1952 we had people driving around in Mercedes with swastika emblems adorning the car in Israel, New York City, London and other areas with high Jewish population. I would bet money that this is likely a (foreign) government that is influencing these faux police cars, it’s simply not a coincidence that these are showing up in areas of high Chinese population in at least 3 different countries.

            I’ve never seen a made up police car of a foreign government on American soil in my life, it’s simply not something normal people do.

          • 0 avatar

            Real experience: I was selling a year’s worth of a music industry magazine (Mix) on ebay. An individual in China expressed interest. I looked into shipping costs and it was way too much from my perspective. Started an email back and forth with the gentleman explaining the cost to ship being so steep. He responded back mentioning he was in the music recording industry there in China. I thought “Cool, I’d like to talk to this person just to get to know him”. About two more emails in and then no more replies. I’m guessing my questions were starting to look either suspicious or dangerous to this fellow and he decided not to take the chance on involving himself in what he knew his country regarded as “unacceptable”. Nothing against you, Slavuta, but I think China is more “evil” than you’ve been lead to believe. The social credits thing is very real from what I’ve seen in articles in what I consider reliable media.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Hummer,

          Let me detour here for Mike’s comment. This is not what I said. He implied that if his family stayed in 1910 in Russia and not moved to US, they were doomed. I said, they had a great chance to survive. Not because Germans would be nice to them, but because Jewish population landscape changed drastically between 1910 and 1941. 1917 revolutions freed Jews from their places of living and they went on Eastwards for opportunities in the communist party, government and military. But also science, medicine, etc. Basically, good chance, by 1941 his family is not even there. Those who remained in villages also could escape. They just needed a good judgement and leave quickly.

          Now back to China.

          – The country has re-education camps for those that don’t do as they are told. — I can’t exercise my 2nd amendment freely in DC, NY, Boston. I am told not to own a gun. What is going to happen when I don’t do as I am told?

          – They have a social credit system for ranking citizens based on their actions and beliefs on the ruling party. — Facebook? Hillary deplorables? Browser built-in extension – trusty source/not trusty source.

          – They will arrest anyone if they suspect you are talking against the ruling party — a little different here. Here we created a system where 2 parties rule, and give no chance to individuals and other parties to participate in elections. Just read, what it takes to get on a ballot.

          – During the Tiananmen square anniversary a CBS journalist was arrested for asking a citizen a question regarding the incident and held for several hours. — Our ally, Saudi Arabia, dismembered journalist in its embassy and guess what? We’re gonna fight Iran on their behalf

          – We know there are Chinese spies in America with ears and possibly mouths close to American elected officials. — Not only that. But every Chinese person in any office or job is potentially source of info. They report on everything, including business practices in small companies. The collect all sorts of info to build on our experience

          Am I totally out of context or you can see the similarities I see? We should be worried about China competing with us. But not about their internal affairs. In fact, the more tyrannical they are to their people, less efficient they will be. And they will lose competition against us. Their business is booming and this only means that they are not so bad. In europe it used to be – the stronger communist party is, the weaker is country’s economy. China economy is strong, which means communist ideology is weak. May be, many people do like it over there after all; and only some who can’t make it are the ones who complain?

          • 0 avatar

            Business is not booming in China, even if you believe the massaged government figures. The economy there has slowed significantly. Car sales are down and growth is the lowest it has been since before Deng was in power. Is it in recession yet, no, but it’s hardly healthy, and that’s putting aside the house of cards that is China’s venture capital, loans, and equity.

            Do you really think it’s appropriate to compare the actions of the tech oligarchs operating in a relatively free market to that of a totalitarian government? I’m no fan of Silicon Valley and the way it spies and manipulates, but it’s not the government and we have machinery through anti-trust legislation and litigation to challenge them. No such challenge to the CCP exists.

            Is there stagnation and corruption in the two-party system here? Sure, but I have friends who have run for office and gotten on the ballot without too much difficulty.

            Whether or not the Saudis are our friends, Khashoggi was no “journalist” just because his buddies at the WaPo gave him some line inches. He was a political operative and hardly friendly to American interests. The fact that Turkey’s Erdogan, who is definitely not our friend, had a role in exposing the Saudi’s killing of him, make me wary of believing just about anything other than the guy is dead. He could have been killed on the orders of the Crown Prince or he could have been killed by those trying to embarass bin Salman.

            When Chinese “internal affairs” extend to the good residents of Irvine, California, they become our affairs.

            As for the Jews who may have returned to Russia, many Soviet Jews came under the immediate control of the Germans following Operation Barbarossa. Those that were outside of Nazi occupation hardly had freedom of travel. Yes, some survived in Siberia, Khazakistan, and Azerbaijin. A good friend of my son’s was born in Baku.

            The Soviet territories occupied by Germany originally contained about 4 million Jews. About one million Jews successfully evacuated to the east, but the survival rates for Jews in Latvia, Lithuania, Ukraine, and western Russia were very low.

            Yes, after the revolution many Jews left the “pale of settlement” for Leningrad and Moscow, allowing them to ultimately survive, but over 40% of the USSR’s Jews died in the Shoah. While a 57% chance is slightly better than even, I’d hardly call that a “great chance to survive.”

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    A Chinese friend of mine said there is a scam crime ring going around, and they are always trying to pretend to be from the Chinese Embassy, until nobody believes them no more.

    So I guess they are starting to dress like the real Chinese cop?

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    Regarding to the armored carriers along HK Shenzhen border, that has happened since, 1997. Before that the same barracks housed British troops. It is a typical troops rotation and the PLAs have been there since 1997. So far none of them has gone out there to suppress the riots yet.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Oh, please. Dude just having fun. He only had Chinese decals and not “Police” decal on his car. This CA cop is a moron. But how smart can be a cop in a state full of delusional morons. It can be China Wok restaurant car.
    Yea, lets make it political. Dictator Xi. Dictator or not – look at us and look at China. They are moving towards greatness with a 100 year plan. And we’re eating each other and eroding this country day by day. If this cop wanted to do some good, he could walk into some construction zone, round up all the illegals and send them into ICE cages. Isn’t it funny that cop is worried about some Chinese symbols on a car while in sanctuary city.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      China Airlines flies about 20 nonstop flights from this country to Beijing. Want me to check on how much a one-way ticket would run for you?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Mike, the way this country operates, soon you might be booking a one way ticket to where your relatives came from.
        20 flights? So many spies?
        BTW, last year Americans retiring abroad jumped by 40% – SSA stats. (they send checks there)

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The Chinese idea of greatness is a CCP footprint on the face of every person in China. Great news if your dad can afford the tuition in Vancouver with a new Lambo every two years. Bad news if you post a Winnie the Pooh meme.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      China has plenty of its own issues: endemic corruption that makes US corruption look penny-ante, bureaucracy that is more responsive to ideological correctness than results, no incentive to develop pioneering IP because it will just get stolen. They are doing some good things, and lifting a lot of Chinese out of poverty (but not those of incorrect ethnic backgrounds). But they are hardly the world-dominating monolith that people like to imagine.

      It reminds me of the fear of Japan in the 1980s, which proved to be totally bogus.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      You can call it moron all you want, but the fact is the local TV news warn people about crime ring scamming old immigrant ladies by pretending to be government officials from China. They escaped with decades of horrors and now they are trying to scam them using their fear.

      This is disgusting and it is not “just having fun”. Like I said imagine someone driving around with a Swastika on the car. That’s all just having fun huh?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        If you refer to swastika in the context of Nazis, remember, Nazis were condemned by international tribunal in Nuremberg. Chinese police wasn’t. This is huge difference

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    UC Irvine (UCI)’s nickname has been University of Chinese Immigrants for a long time. guy might be trying to shake down some of these kids for money? somehow its just fine to put up walls for brown folk who want to work, but not for people that have lots of money. there are “maternity hospitals” in the san gabriel valley for chinese women with money that want to have an anchor baby on american soil. somehow that just fine, too. they arent brown and they have money.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    I aee the simple explanation for this aberrant behavior seems not to have been mentioned. Nutcases exist in all races. Whackos we call ’em in my area of the backwoods.

    Running around in a sorta kinda police car is not a mere prank. It’s a clear sign that the driver needs to have a chat with a medical professional who can provide a course of treatment.

    About like all the mad Chinese government conspiracy theorists that show up here and bark like mad dogs on cue whenever China gets mentioned.

    Sign of the times, I guess. Everything’s off kilter.

  • avatar

    How then Blues brothers managed to drive real police car without any consequences. Well in the process they also managed to destroy the whole fleet of police cars in the town.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    It does say that they are looking for more victims/witnesses. So yeah I’m reading this as complaints about someone impersonating Chinese officials driving a black Audi and not calls about someone driving a black Audi that looks like a Chinese Police Car. IE he was actually trying to or did succeed in getting people to pull over.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • scott25: Subaru’s done a good enough job of sanitizing themselves. They haven’t made anything with that old character...
  • Pig_Iron: Which end is the head?
  • Arthur Dailey: My maternal grandfather lost all of his family. Yet was locked up for a number of months in Canada as...
  • DenverMike: @PrincipalDan – Did you ask him “why” the upcharge? It sounds like they don’t...
  • FreedMike: Yep, I own an A3 (the Premium Plus model with the upgraded interior bits, natch) and the 3’s far...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States