By on September 19, 2019

Despite sales of the Infiniti Q50 looking a little light this year, Nissan’s luxury arm has decided the model moves in numbers substantial enough to keep it on offer. The same cannot be said for the vehicle’s entry level 2.0-liter turbo, however. The motor will be going away for the 2020 model year, leaving the twin-turbo 3.0-liter V6 as the sedan’s only available powerplant.

Replacing the base 2.0 Pure will be the 3.0t Pure. While a seven-speed automatic transmission continues sending power to the rear wheels (AWD is optional), base models now produce a claimed 300 horsepower. Considering the old 2.0-liter only produced 208 hp, you might think the change comes with a hefty price increase. But you’d be wrong. Infiniti is only asking for $36,400 (plus a $1,025 destination fee) for the base level Q50. That’s just $750 more than last year’s base model four banger.

While not as lavishly equipped as higher trimmed models, the 3.0t Pure offers 17-inch alloys, a dual exhaust system, LED headlamps, leather (and leatherette) upholstery, eight-way power seats, dual-zone climate control, and a bevy of convenience/safety items you’d expect to find on a premium Japanese sedan (Android Auto, Apple Car Play, automatic wipers, emergency braking, keyless entry, etc).

You can also get all-wheel drive, but paint options are rather limited. It looks like Infiniti is only offering base models in grayscale.

Opting for a more interesting hue or Infiniti’s various equipment packages requires stepping up to the Q50 3.0t Luxe trim. While the motor is identical, Luxe offers an upgraded interior materials, moonroof, 18-inch wheels, and HomeLink capabilities. It begins at $38,850 before destination.

The 3.0t Sport incorporates the Essential, ProASSIST and Sensory packages available on Luxe while adding sport-inspired aesthetics, 19-inch wheels, Bose audio system, and heated sport seats with thigh extensions. It begins at $48,500, without destination, but you’ll want to splurge and get the 2020 Q50 Red Sport 400 for $54,250 if it’s on your radar.

Red Sport variants include all of the previously mentioned items by default and receive a 3.0-liter motor tuned up to 400 hp. Models also receive unique interior and exterior enhancements, special paddle shifters, quilted sport seats with red contrast stitching, red brake calipers, and exclusive 19-inch wheels. While expensive, Infiniti doesn’t let you add much. Save for a few accessories and the optional “Proactive Package,” it’s as loaded as the automaker can make it.

Infiniti has also added an updated version of its InTouch infotainment system to the Q50, which splits the central display into an 8-inch upper and 7-inch lower unit. While not a perfect system, previous examples of InTouch have provided countless ways to interface with the car. You just need a little time to familiarize yourself with the arrangement before it feels truly useful.

[Images: Infiniti]

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27 Comments on “2020 Infiniti Q50 Goes V6 Only, Increases Pricing...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I have long thought the Q50 is underrated, and at $37,000 (asking) with the twin-turbo six, it’s a steal. I’d take this over a C-class Benz or 3-series BMW any day.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      While its the older model based on G37 the wife and I came to the same conclusion and bought a used Q60. We test drove the German offerings but long term ownership means visits to the dealership which scared us away quickly. The 3-series is oversized so we didn’t sample it and instead tested out the 2-series which is amazing. However the C-class was frankly bad and underwhelming to say the least. The wife wanted nothing to do with it regardless of the 3 pointed star on the nose. The Infiniti was the clear winner then.

      Not sure why the Infiniti isn’t more popular. I guess everyone just assumes its a fancy Nissan and ignores it. Ours was used from CarMax and we haven’t had to set foot in the Infiniti service bay. Car has 40K on it so far and all I’ve done is a brake job. The paint is crappy with some clear coat damage and just like my Nissan 350Z the aluminum hood chips way too easily. Some metal interior trim on the doors also shows damage which I plan on fixing with vinyl wrap. Mileage with the V6 isn’t great at 20 around town which my V8 Corvette manages to match. The trunk in the coupe is tiny and the backseats are worthless as even our young nieces hate it back there. Other then that the car is basically perfect, its smooth, quiet and powerful. Handling is great, I would like a little more firmness in the wheel but the wife likes the effort and feedback level as is.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I looked at a used Q50 with the 3.7, and it was down to that or the A3 I ended up buying (the Audi was just too much damn fun to say no to). The Infiniti’s more of a cruiser, but it’s a really good one, and it’s a killer highway car. The only real problem I had was the infotainment system, which was confusing, to put it lightly. I also didn’t like the idea of getting 20 mpg on premium-only, but as it turns out, the A3’s good for 23. Ah well.

        Otherwise, I’d recommend the Q50 wholeheartedly, and I’d have to think the engine just makes it better.

        • 0 avatar

          I wouldn’t recommend the Q50 wholeheartedly. You can’t have ventilated seats in any trim, the navigation is an optional extra (without it you get a black clock), and the leatherette feels nasty. They still can’t align the dash trim panels properly (see photo).

          It’s also dated, and upper trims force you to have the electric steer if you want the digital suspension.

          It rides like trash without said suspension.

      • 0 avatar
        Snooder

        The problem was the price.

        The 2.0 was garbage with 200hp, while the actually decent 3.0t started at 40k. I got my Q60 luxe used, but the msrp on it new was around 52k. And it just isn’t a 52k car.

        Meanwhile you could get a BMW 230i for 35k starting or an ATS coupe for 38k. And if you really need that Japanese reliability, toyota sells the RC200t and RC350.

        • 0 avatar
          Snooder

          Oh yeah, almost forgot.

          It doesn’t even have paddle shifters unless you get the top end Sport and Red Sport trims. Which you should if you care about handling at all.

        • 0 avatar
          chiefmonkey

          “The problem was the price” Infiniti is notorious for the “lease for $299 a month with $6,999 due at signing” type deals.

          • 0 avatar
            ma1234

            Due at signinig?

            My last Q50 lease was $0 due at singing, no first months payment and $330/month for 39 months/12k miles. And I didn’t really have to negotiate it much at all. And it was not a stripped model. It was a V6 with Navi and other options and a $44k sticker. When the lease was up I switched to Audi, because I realized driving 2007 technology in 2019 wasn’t fun.

          • 0 avatar
            ma1234

            Due at signinig?

            My last Q50 lease was $0 due at singing, no first months payment and $330/month for 39 months/12k miles. And I didn’t really have to negotiate it much at all. And it was not a stripped model. It was a V6 with Navi and other options and a $44k sticker. When the lease was up I switched to Audi, because I realized driving 2007 technology in 2019 wasn’t fun.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Having driven what seems like a thousand of these thanks to Hertz, all in 3.0t form, they are overrated. Cheaper than a BMW or MB and they never let you forget it. Decent engine, shame what they bolt it into. Weirdly narrow cabin, crappy interior materials and layout, the WORST infotainment system other than a Toyota, and indifferent ride and handling. Fast in a straight line is about the best I can say about these things.

  • avatar
    22_RE_Speedwagon

    Make the red sport engine the base model and I’ll come back to the brand. When I bought my 2008 g35, 306 hp was the only engine and a lot for the segment. And I got it for 29k, nicely equipped.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    (insert applause gif here)

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    A very good move by a rather quirky company, and especially since I see gauges and not an LCD screen. Drivers everywhere rejoice, at least one good thing has happened in the industry lately.

  • avatar
    Crashdaddy430

    I find it ludicrous that in the modern age of trickle down economics while even base model cars like a cruise or civic have features that 10 years ago would only be reserved for luxury cars like review cameras and blind spot monitoring you still have to move up a whole trim package just to get friggin homelink. I’ve noticed that with other manufacturers as well. My parents 99 TL had homelink standard 20 years ago. Time for it to move to the realm of power windows and doors locks – as standard equipment.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    It’s a great looking car from all angles, as is the Q60. I second JMII, not sure why this isn’t a more popular car in its segment.

    Then again maybe that’s a good thing. A little exclusivity is tough to come by these days.

  • avatar

    Thats sweet! It means that you can buy it for $30K OTD! I do not know how it drives though. G35 was very nice. If they did not screw it up then WOW! The only thing is – can they get rid of turbo and lower price even more? 3.5L would be even better.

  • avatar

    THE ONLY PROBLEM IS THAT IT LOOKS UGLY.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Finally, a decent automotive news

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I was very interested in getting a Q50 and honestly it’s always been on my potentials list dating back to G35 days. I’ve always thought each generation was attractive though the last G37/first Q50 was a bit bland.

    I test drove a used Red Sport and really really liked it. I still do. The $339/mo lease turned out to be too good to pass on otherwise I may have gotten the Infiniti.

  • avatar
    Goatshadow

    Twin-turbo V6 and only 300hp does not compute. Did they detune it so they could charge more for the “sport”?

    Edit: it’s also puke-ugly

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      All I need to know is:

      a: Peak torque
      b: How broad is the torque plateau?

    • 0 avatar
      turbo_awd

      Yes – the 300 hp version is detuned. The 400 hp version adds a couple of sensors in the turbo that are generally unneeded. An ECU tune of the base model is good for ~400-450 hp.

      I almost bought one, except for the fact that the sport seats are too narrow for me – I got sore sitting in them for 5 minutes at the widest setting (a problem I also had with the G37 sport seats). However, I wanted the bigger brakes and better suspension. Plus, I heard too many awkward things about the electric steering.

      They really, REALLY need a better transmission in this thing. And maybe get the engine into the 370Z..

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Looove my wife’s 2008 Infiniti M35x that she bought quickly to replace her dead MINI. Mostly for the expansive interior that can fit out 6’7″ teenage son without issue.

    I’m eying an Infiniti for the Mustang replacement – don’t get me wrong, I love the Mustang 3.7V6 with the 6MT but only a car like that carries a lot of baggage. Prefer to fly under the radar.


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