By on September 11, 2019

2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport

2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport

1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder (201 horsepower @ 6,000 rpm; 195 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm)

Six-speed manual, front-wheel drive

22 city / 30 highway / 25 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

10.7 city, 7.8 highway, 9.4 combined. (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $22,600 (U.S) / $25,449 (Canada)

As Tested: $23,655 (U.S.) / $27,459 (Canada)

Prices include $920 destination charge in the United States and $1,810 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

The 2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport makes a compelling case for saving the manual transmission. But perhaps not compelling enough, as between the time I drove this car and wrote this review, Hyundai killed the stick in the 2020 Elantra Sport.

I daresay that’s not the car’s fault — the stick-shift Sport would be on my shopping list if I were eyeing a sporty compact commuter. Market forces continue to kill off manual transmissions and, while some brands are fighting the good fight, Hyundai must not have seen a business case in doing battle.

That’s too bad, because the budget buyer looking for value in a sporty compact car just lost one option.

This thing is cheaper than all the segment stalwarts — from Honda Civic Si to Volkswagen Jetta GLI and Subaru WRX (all of which offer manuals) — even if it doesn’t make quite as much power as any of those, or perform quite as well. You’d think that offering approximately 75-80 percent of the performance of the biggest names in the segment at a much lower price while not requiring buyers to sacrifice the chance to shift for themselves would send sport-compact shoppers flocking towards Hyundai. But not enough of them selected the stick apparently.

At 201 horsepower and 195 lb-ft of torque coming from a 1.6-liter turbo four, the Sport is close-ish to the Civic Si in horsepower and barely beats it in torque (these are 2019 figures). Yet it doesn’t feel quite as quick, and it’s not quite as astute a handler as that car. It also gives up power to the GLI (228 ponies, 258 lb-ft), and as with the Civic Si, doesn’t appear to be quite as good at carving corners.

2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport

It’s also let down by slightly too-light, albeit appropriately quick, steering and a shifter that isn’t as sharp as what’s on offer in the other manufacturers. The clutch is also not on par with the Honda or VW. As a combo, the shifter and clutch aren’t bad, but they fall short of the competition. That said, the combo is still good enough to provide the kind of driving fun that makes manual-transmission enthusiasts grin. Hence, this Hyundai’s case for saving the manuals.

A multi-link rear suspension works in concert with stiffer front and rear springs and better damping to provide superior handling than what your “normal” Elantra offers. Once again, the Sport isn’t quite on the same level as its competition, but it’s good enough to provide plenty of enjoyment.

Most of your pleasure will need to come from behind the wheel — Elantra Sport doesn’t do much to visually distinguish itself from other Elantras (probably the most obvious marker is the flat-bottom steering wheel. That means the look is a bit plain Jane, although not ugly.

That plain, form-follows-function look carries over to the interior, as well. Red stripes on the shifter and steering wheel don’t do much to make things less boring, but at least the switchgear is easy to use.

2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport

Ride is a tad stiff but not too harsh for commuting, and the car does allow in a bit too much noise. But you’re going to sacrifice some refinement in the name of fun at this price.

You won’t sacrifice much in terms of fuel economy, however. The Sport trim is rated at 22 mpg city/30 mpg highway/25 mpg combined.

My test car had just one option — carpeted floor mats ($135). Standard features included forward collision-avoidance assist, lane-keep assist, blind-spot collision warning, rear cross-traffic collision warning, 18-inch wheels, LED lights, satellite radio, dual USB ports, power sunroof, Bluetooth, Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, flat-bottom steering wheel, hands-free trunk release, keyless entry, and push-button start.

2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport

With the stick-shift going away for 2020, the Elantra Sport strikes me as a suddenly less-appealing alternative to the Civic Si and Jetta GLI as we move into the next model year. However, 2019s are still on dealer lots, meaning that if you’re in the market, you have a value choice that offers you three pedals and similar, if not the same, performance.

Too bad the next Sport won’t have a stick. Sure, overall performance may not suffer much, but the reason the #savethemanuals crowd exists is to extoll the fun-to-drive virtues of cars with clutch pedals. And the Elantra Sport is (or was) a prime example.

The Elantra Sport will remain a cheap alternative to two great cars, if you’re willing to sacrifice about 20 percent in terms of performance. But I’d recommend getting yours now, while you still can choose to shift for yourself.

 

[Images © 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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62 Comments on “2019 Hyundai Elantra Sport Review – Making a Case for Saving the Manuals...”


  • avatar
    jack4x

    30 mpg highway in a 1.6L compact car? The low city figure I can understand because I imagine a car like this is geared and tuned for sport rather than mileage. But wow, what is the reasoning behind such a low 6th gear?

    The Civic Si is rated 38 highway by the way.

    No wonder people are switching to SUVs, there’s hardly any downside.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      Hyundai has always been a weak competitor if you’re looking at MPG numbers in the compact class. I like the more boring styling of dash in these with an integrated screen vs. the tablet-stuck-to-the-dash arrangement of the hatchback.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I’ve had a non-Sport (SE) rental with the 6spd auto and NA 1.8 mill that got me an easy indicated 41-42mpg in an all-highway drive without me trying very hard. Was pretty impressed with it overall, just quietly competent like Corollas of yore. Well tuned suspension, easy controls, decent visibility, adequate power, nothing that offended.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Again, really depends on engine and transmission combo.

        The 2.0T engine is ancient and tied to the inefficient manual results in a poor fuel economy figure.

        But the newer 1.4T w/ the DCT combo in the Elantra gets 41 MPG HWY (EPA rating).

        Even the Forte w/ the old 2.0L, but this timed connected to a CVT gets 41 HWY MPG in the FE trim.

        Honda and Toyota have already moved much of their lineup to their lightweight platform and latest fuel efficient engines.

        Hyundai just started moving models to their new platform w/ their new Smartstream engines starting w/ the Sonata.

    • 0 avatar
      BillyZoom

      I have a 2018 version of the Elantra Sport (manual); with ~40K kms on it, my average consumption is 7.1 l/100km (approx 50/50 urban/rural driving). Except for a few mins after filling up the tank, i’ve never seen the high-side of 8l/100kms; i don’t understand where these mileage ratings come from. I’ve owned an Si, and for 95% of the time I’m driving, this car is more comfortable, better riding, less conspicuous and easier to use (I’m thinking features and design details here). No question, the Si is funner, louder-looking and a punch above in terms of refinement, but this is a better daily ride. Beware that this Hyundai lacks a limited-slip differential (it REALLY needs one), and swap out the 225/40-18 for 235/45-17 (much improved ride, less noise, no harm to handling).

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      That’s w/ an old engine and a manual – so not exactly a great combo for fuel economy.

      The Elantra w/ the 1.4T and the DCT gets 41 MPG on the highway.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I test drove a then new 2017 manual. I certainly wasn’t blown away by its performance but I was very impressed with the quality of the interior for the price. I much preferred the look prior to last year’s face lift – to the point where I would buy a used one over new – but it’s still a good option for something with a little spirit for a reasonable amount of money.

    Losing the manual is indeed sad. Though they were not exactly easy to find.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I really don’t know why get Si vs this one. It is not that much better. But your review says it had multi-link in the back. When I tested this, it was 2017 model. And it had excellent brakes (unlike Si), steering about same. Clutch was the issue. But in my book, none of these have clutch and steering as good as Mazda anyways, by far. Didn’t try GTI though.

  • avatar
    make_light

    The Elantra used to be one of the more handsome/restrained choices in this class. Now it looks goofy, angular, and Prius-like. Why did they do that? I did have rental recently though and the inside was well screwed together. Not plush materials, but felt solid. Even the vent slats were much sturdier than cars costing far more.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Agreed on all points. Had a 2017/2018ish rental, thought the interior was far from luxurious but felt like solid quality, well screwed together. And they were mildly handsome, at worst inoffensive/generic. Now it’s notably angrier and uglier. Why?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Interior and clutch were the real show stoppers for me. If I could get Mazda6 for same $$$ – this is exactly what I’ve done. Mazda6 is slower but everything else (save brakes) is way better

  • avatar
    jh26036

    30 highway 25 mixed, is downright awful in this class. This is on par with typical H/K products though. Cheap entry price, more costly to operate, and probably terrible resale.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I dunno, I got 36 or so on the highway in my ’17 Jetta 1.4T, and this Elantra would have smoked it easily. If you want an Elantra that puts up big EPA numbers, buy the lower-performance version.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        The point is though that it’s not competitive in class, and frankly awful for the level of power you get. Besides the fact that a small turbo engine might use more power when accelerating, but should be able to stay out of boost on the highway and get better mileage (see 38 mpg Civic Si).

        There’s a lot of cars out there that are rated 30 mpg highway with more power than this thing including most 2.0T compact sport sedans, 4 cylinder Mustang/Camaro, GTI & Golf R, etc.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Uncompetitive? Meh. It’s a matter of priorities.

          Jetta GLI (manual or auto): 25/32.

          I’ll call that a statistical tie. And if you want a GLI optioned out like the Elantra Sport (leather seats, sunroof, etc), you’ll spend a bit under $30,000.

          And, yes, a Si will get better mileage. It’ll also cost you about three grand more in the real world (and that’s a kind estimate).

          I don’t perceive a couple of MPG as being a deal-sealer or deal-killer with this kind of car. If we’re talking the base versions, that’s a different story.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I was looking at this car. And back then, every review was posting 30mpg real world avg mileage. All reviewers said, it beats EPA ratings with no sweat.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The bottom line here is whether you want to save money or go fast. If it’s the latter, spend the extra money and pop for a GTI. If it’s the former, though, this car is an absolutely *killer* value – you can pick one up for around $20,000 in my area. And at that transaction price, this car is absolutely brilliant – it’s equipped like an up-market Corolla or Civic, and costs less, but offers far better performance.

    Here’s hoping they upgraded the dual-clutch automatic, though – it’s a good example of how to execute an unsatisfying DCT.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      “it’s a good example of how to execute an unsatisfying DCT.”

      How to execute an unsatisfying DCT:

      Step 1. Equip vehicle with DCT

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I disagree on that one – driven a GTI lately? My A3 has one as well. I don’t find much to complain about in either unit. I had an A5 as a service loaner a while back with a 7-speed DCT, and it performed flawlessly.

        The difference is that these are wet-clutch units; the Hyundai is a dry-clutch (same for the infamous lawsuit-bait unit Ford put in the Focus).

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Agree with those quipping about mileage. In this class and at this price, it matters especially when there are other reasons to pick competitors over this.

    With the stick disappearing, it’s hard to think there’s much more compelling about this car… except for it’s MSRP.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    More Korean krap with or without 3 pedals. Just buy any Civic or Corolla and at least you’ll have a car worth something when the time comes to part ways.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      But I have to look at the Civic and the Corolla is down like 30 Horsepower to this. Some people like to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        thejohnnycanuck

        So horsepower is the most important measuring stick? We have a new Corolla hatch with the 6spd manual and it does just fine. It also looks great, handles remarkably well with the 18 inch wheels and as I pointed out it’s a Toyota so it’s going to last and hold its value.

        And don’t give me this “some people like to drive” crap. You sound like a snob.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          “More Korean krap… … at least you’ll have a car worth something”

          “You sound like a snob”

          Care to guess what you sound like?

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “So horsepower is the most important measuring stick?”

          It is definitely on the podium. And if I’m honest it is in front of resale and long-term reliability for me. YMMV though, it is good that people have some options.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Why is that such a shock to people @johnny. Yes, there are people who put factors like horsepower and handling above things like resale andf “gasp” even long term reliability. What do I care if a car “does fine” for a decade plus if I hate it.

          Even if I had to spend a little time at the dealership from time to time I’d rather do that long term than drive a less exciting car. Nobody on their death bed ever says “I wish my car had gotten more black dots in the consumer reports review.”

          If Toyota builds a truly hot version of the Corolla hatchback (think a real GT-S variant), I’ll be excited. Until then I don’t care. I am happy you like it but some people buy with other priorities.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      “Korean Krap” like the Telluride and Palisade are actually selling at a premium above sticker; can’t say that for the Japanese.

  • avatar
    scott25

    The only reason I can think of for them discontinuing the manual is because it was cannibalizing too many Veloster Turbos and GT N-Lines at a lower profit margin

  • avatar
    gtem

    I hate the updated styling, and the way-oversized wheel have been an issue since the Sport debuted. But I’ve actually started to entertain the notion of a minor upgrade into something a bit more engaging from the 2012 Camry SE 4cyl that I’ve commandeered from my wife since we bought our Town&Country. A lightly used Elantra Sport with a stick in the $15k range (and 16 inch wheels from an SE swapped over) sounds like it would fit the bill, although that fuel economy rating sounds surprisingly low. I’m assuming you could easily beat it in the the real world. Also glanced at used Jetta Sport 1.8TSI prices (also very tempting), then realized how stinking cheap the last of the VW CCs (Euro Passat) are. 2.0T, stick shift, German VIN, $13k-ish for a single owner sub-50k mile 2015!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      With you on the styling – the ’18 was a VERY handsome little car. Replace the Hyundai badges with four little rings, and it’d look right at home in an Audi showroom.

      Came pretty close to actually buying one last fall – it was a dealer trade for a deal that fell through, and it’d been on their lot for months. It had all the options (including a navigation package) and they advertised it for $19,500 on their website. Amazingly enough, though, that price wasn’t available when it came to sign papers – the price was now magically $23,000. Told them to go perform anatomically impossible acts on themselves in a very loud voice. That was the second time a Hyundai dealer had tried to treat me like a schmuck in almost as many years, and as much as I like their product, they’re going to have one hell of a hard time trying to get me in a third time. Shame.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      +2

      Across automotive history, what’s the success rate on facelifts? Clarification: What’s the success rate on facelifts as evaluated by people with taste who don’t have a vested interest in “maintaining access”? I’m going to say it’s like 1-2%, if that. The original design was that way for a reason. “Freshening” it almost never results in an improvement. The cheerleaders in the press seem to rate facelift success at well over 75%.

      The only exception that pops into my head is the ’77 Firebird, which I think was an improvement over its immediate predecessor. But that’s a facelift of a facelift. I’m not sure I’d take a ’77 over a ’70. I’m sure there are other examples; I’m just not thinking of them.

  • avatar
    tallguy130

    Owner of the 2017 version of the Elantra Sport (with manual) here. Few thoughts:
    – I get 36mpg on the freeway pretty consistently so I wonder where they get the 30 number from. However I would agree it’s thirsty in the city if you have a heavy foot.
    – I know it’s subjective but I agree the new facelift did this car no favors. Prius like is right. Yuck.
    – I agree with Tim (mostly) on the performance deficit compared to the Si or GTI. It’s not quite as good but it’s damn close. Good comparison is a Costco version of the Si.
    – But it kills it on value. No one is paying close to sticker and I guarantee you can get one for under 20k with minimal effort. I don’t think you can say that about the Si or GTI. You get a lot for your money and more could have been made of that in the review. Loss of the stick is a bummer tho…such is the world now…

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      However I would agree it’s thirsty in the city if you have a heavy foot.

      Dirty secret – all turbos are.

      I can get 30 plus mpg all day long at 75 to 85 mph and cruise locked in with my 2.0T. (That’s actually above the EPA rating.)

      However in the city, utilizing the meat of the power band and in some cases doing my own tail of the dragon imitation on quiet curvy stretches early in the AM. I’m at roughly 20-22 mpg.

      Its the nature of the beast. But I’m having fun so I don’t care.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        all turbos are thirsty with heavy foot

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Horsepower is horsepower, if you are using it, it really doesn’t matter how you make it. A V6 of the same power would suck as much or more gas under a heavy foot. I don’t understand why people don’t understand this.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            @ krhodes1 – I feel like naturally aspirated engines are a little more tolerant of “binary” drivers, but I don’t have data to back that up.

            I do know that in small-displacement turbo vehicles, I tend to best EPA ratings and really best scribes’ ratings, because I’m not in the boost in most situations.

            I’d actually be curious to drive, e.g., the same-year I4T, V6, and V8 Mustang or Camaro under identical conditions to see what kind of mileage I got.

    • 0 avatar
      cprescott

      I bought my 2016 Elantra used and benefited not having to pay the pathetic and artificial Honduh and Toyoduh tax. I don’t care what people PERCEIVE a hyundai to be like, real world experience suggests that it does everything a Duh sister car can do and as well. I’m not planning on keeping this for over 20 years like my last Ford but I suspect reliability of the Hyundai in the real world is not worth paying $4k more to secure Duh sister perceived quality.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I much prefer the more useful hatchback GT version. Too bad about the death of the manual.

    Hey VW I know I just bought a car but when it comes time for the next one, if the Jetta GLI exists and still has a manual trans. I’m knocking on your door. The price gulf between the GLI and GTI would make the GLI my first choice.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Part of the price differential is that the Jetta’s interior is far more cheaped-out than the Golf, and this is true of the performance versions as well. The interior on any Golf is notably high-grade.

      Then again, the Jetta has a terrific back seat, and it’s a first class sleeper.

      Personally, I’d take the GTI, but YMMV.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Don’t forget (as can be said of the GLI) there’s a little bit of “WTF is that?” factor that I love. Or I might remove the GLI badging and go for a sleeper look, but likely I’d end up with a “look at me” color and darkly tinted windows.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        There is very little in it with the latest MQB Jettas as far as interior quality. The price difference between the GTI and GLI is because VW knows people will pay it. Though I suppose the MKVIII GTI might move the game on again – it’s supposed to get a significant power bump too.

        Personally, I don’t care – the added utility of the GTI means the GLI would not get a look in for me. My back seat is mostly decorative, but I use that hatch *all* the time. I really wish I could have gotten a 3dr GTI, but they killed those the year before I bought mine.

        Of course, what I really want, and would cheerfully pay a small fortune for new is a Golf Sportwagon GTI – call it the GTL. :-) Make it a 3dr longroof and I would pay BMW money for it. But I freely admit I am weird that way.

        As for the Elantra – I have yet to be impressed by any H/K product. Ever. Cheap for a reason.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    I have a 2016 Hyundai Elantra 6 speed manual that is delivering consistent 46 mpgs per tank and recently turned in 48 mpgs on the last one (measured by taking miles traveled and divided by gallons pumped into the tank – I do the same procedure at each stop for consistency… pump clicks off, wait 30 seconds, and end fueling at 2nd click off). I’m sure that this car that was tested could easily exceed 40 mpgs – but then again I’ve driven a stick for over 30 years and I know to get the car into high as soon as possible without lugging the engine.

    My Hyundai is remarkable in its short throws and once I got used to that, it is clean and easy to drive through the gears and the pickup is much better than an automatic I tested of the same vintage prior to buying this one.

    I love my Hyundai.

    • 0 avatar
      pinkslip

      I’m gonna guess you have the 1.4T or the 2.0L, not the 1.6T in the Sport trim.

      Funny enough, a consistent complaint/nit pick from auto journalists reviewing the Elantra Sport 6-speed was how long the shift throws are. Was your last manual from the 1980s?

  • avatar

    At least the hatch still gets the stick.

    I’ll say this for Hyundai, they are not as slick as Honda, but about 90% of the way there with really nice build quality and the warranty is there to help with any reliability fears.

    I bought a used 2016 Elantra GT with a 6-speed and thoroughly enjoy the car. It’s held up well for the little over a year I’ve had it.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Heck after seeing the fit and finish and the several issues my friend has had with a ’17 Civic, I’d come running to the Koreans. Some horrible panel alignment, some weird premature failures of the wiper linkage and a cowl cover piece, all inside of 3 years old and less tahn 30k miles.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Won’t offer the Elantra Sport with a manual and won’t offer the Veloster N or R-Spec with an automatic.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Supposedly the Veloster in N form is supposed to get the 7 speed DCT in 2020. (Mentioned during an Alex on Autos review.)

      In a high performance car whether it be a hot hatch or a muscle car or a supercar I expect an honest to god manual trans with rev matching as the only assistance.

      The market obviously disagrees with me.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “The market obviously disagrees with me.”

        Finally my preferences and the preferences of the overall automotive market align! I think I’m getting too old for a Veloster anyway. And even though it looks and sounds cool it is still FWD.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Good first try in 2017, but they completely ruined it by making it ugly (those wheels! and the cheap triangle fog lights at the front) – forgetaboutit. I owned a 2017 and it was good, except for the road noise and ride which were nowhere near to being acceptable.

  • avatar
    chiefmonkey

    It’s too weird looking. I’d say the hidden gem in Hyundai’s lineup right now is the GT hatch. Even with the standard engine, it is surprisingly competent. I unexpectedly got one as a rental and that naturally aspirated 2.0 wasn’t bad at all. There was fun to be had.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    The ’18 Elantra Sport was on my short list last year, but there wasn’t a Sport manual close by. I instead went for a leftover ’17 Focus ST in ST3 trim. They were both around the same price. I got the ST for $23.4k. The extra power is nice (as are the leather Recaros), tho I only get ~32 mpg on the highway. It’s geared for performance, not mileage.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    Not a fan of the front end styling changes. Previously, it looked like a baby Genesis G80 sport. Now, it looks a little too Anime` for my tastes.

  • avatar
    stuki

    “..Market forces continue to kill off manual transmissions…”

    “Market forces” are in no way killing off manual transmissions.

    Quite to the contrary: Arbitrary, artificial government restrictions imposed to prevent market forces from functioning, is what is killing manuals off.

    Organically occurring “market forces” may well be responsible for demand for manuals decreasing vis-a-vis earlier periods. But there’s still a heck of a lot more manual intenders in the US, than in Andorra, as well as in most countries around the world.

    Instead, what is causing a mere reduction in demand to morph into “killing off,” is solely, 100%, restrictions preventing dealers, distributors and makers from dealing directly with all the manual intenders in the US as one single market. Which would be a huge one. Even if only 5% of the total US auto market, the market for manuals in the US as a whole, is still up there with the market for F150s in Texas. Hardly “killing off” territory.

    But when you live in a totalitarian dump, where freely transacting between erstwhile free individuals, is forced to act an ever more distant second to propping up connected clowns, like “franchise owners”, “medallion owners” and the banksters which funded them and politicians living off their donations, you do indeed end up with manuals, like all else worth bothering with, being sacrificed at the altar of keeping the leeching classes in unearned splendor. Free Markets, which explicitly means leaving free individual sellers and buyers free to route around any restrictions which may prevent them from making a mutually beneficial deal, has nothing to with it whatsoever.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      So your contention is that if you were just allowed to drive up to the front door of Ford or GM and offer them your money, they would stop their billion dollar assembly line to build you and the other 1-2% (not 5%) of manual car buyers exactly what you want?

      I own 4 manual transmission cars, 3 of which I bought new since 2015. I mourn their loss more than most. But one of those cars sat for over two years on the lot. Another sat for 8 months. Neither had even been test driven once. Dealers stock what sells. Manufacturers build what sells. That is the definition of market forces. There’s no shady cartel telling manufacturers what to build. If your dealer doesn’t stock a car with a manual, factory order it as long as it’s offered. Guess what, if more people did that, more manuals would be offered.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I am just glad a few manufacturers are starting to figure out that some of us will pay more for the “manual option” I am willing to pay significantly more for the extra pedal.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think I need to drink a *lot* more for what stuki’s saying to make sense to me.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Such a “totalitarian dump” that you can go right to your local Dodge dealer this very moment, give them $45k, and walk out with the crazed, tire-smoking, manual-equipped Challenger Scat Pack that’s on the front page right this very moment.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Something looks wrong with that exhaust tip. The design seems betting for a matching pair on the other side. Without a matching pair, this would look better with a more toned down look.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I’ve always liked these. I don’t mind the headlight treatment, but the wheels are hideous. As a whole it’s better looking than an Civic SI sedan (for some reason the coupe SI doesn’t offend me).
    Ultimately I’d pay more for a base GLI but this is a good choice for 1st time car buyer with a warranty that would allow him/her/they to pay down student loans and not worry about car repair costs.


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  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States