By on August 21, 2019

2019 Toyota Prius AWD-e blue - Image: Toyota

Confusion still reigns in the minds of auto consumers, especially when it comes to the murky world of electrification. Past studies have shown that years of misleading terminology and boasting about the capabilities of hybrid and plug-in hybrid vehicles resulted in a public that knew little about the changing auto landscape, or what a hybrid car even does.

“What will happen when my hybrid’s battery depletes?” is a question too many people still ask themselves.

The same murkiness is at play in a recent study by Cox Automotive, in which we learn that Toyota has earned a reputation it doesn’t deserve.

Cox surveyed some 2,503 consumers and 308 franchised dealers to pinpoint barriers to electric vehicle ownership. Consumer expectations were also on the must-find list. The study — the first in a four-part series — is full of useful data on the driving styles and associated costs of various age demographics, as well as the respondents’ attitudes.

The consumer group included those who already own an EV and those looking to buy, as well as those with no intention of kicking internal combustion to the curb. Go figure, the vast majority (83 percent) of so-called “non-considerers” placed range anxiety at the top of their gripe list, with cost (70 percent) a runner-up. For those who’d consider an EV purchase, cost topped the list of ownership barriers, with 77 percent perceiving initial costs as being more than that of a conventional car.

Nothing shocking here. As battery prices drop and range expands, EVs are slowly becoming more viable in terms of  cost and driving range, but they’re still years away from being on par with ICE-powered vehicles. The culling of small cars and big boosts to both standard safety equipment and fuel economy has elevated an ICE vehicle’s average selling price at a rate double that of EVs.

What is surprising, at least for those who assume the public is well-versed on all things automotive, is how the respondents ranked automakers on the EV file. Essentially, this crowd was asked which brands spring to mind when thinking EVs. As Cars Direct noted, Toyota comes in at No. 2, right behind first-ranked Tesla. While some 81 percent of respondents mentioned Tesla, an automaker which has never sold a non-EV vehicle, some 52 percent listed Toyota.

Toyota sells a great number of hybrid vehicles (the Prius and RAV4 Hybrid, to name a couple of top segment sellers), as well as a lone plug-in hybrid (Prius Prime), but it currently fields exactly zero electric vehicles. The limited-market Mirai powers itself solely by electricity, but an on-board hydrogen tank and fuel cell converts that fuel to electric current. No giant battery pack needed, no plug to be found.

It looks like Toyota’s hybrid game has made it a major player in the EV field, if only in people’s minds.

Automakers who put the money and effort into building a viable, lower-cost EV fared worse in the recognition test. Only 47 percent of respondents mentioned Chevrolet, seller of the 248-mile Bolt and, until recently, the “extended range electric vehicle” Volt.

Nissan fared worse. Despite selling the all-electric Leaf — a car now well into its second generation — since the beginning of the decade, only 42 percent mentioned Nissan. Ungrateful bastards, a brand loyalist might say.

Toyota was a reluctant late entry in the “all Americans will want an EV” game, prefering to offer hybridized versions of its existing models for not that much more money. That strategy’s still top of mind. From an environmental and cost perspective, it’s a solid plan, but Toyota knew it couldn’t hold out forever. With its rivals promising Big EV Things in the coming decade, Toyota hauled itself aboard the bandwagon.

Six electric vehicles are incoming from Toyota between 2020 and 2025, but brand perception is not something it needs to lose sleep over.

[Image: Toyota]

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54 Comments on “Toyota – the Non-EV Brand People Assume Is an EV Brand...”


  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is more a sign of Toyota’s brand equity in Prius than anything else.

    At this point, EVs basically only exist in big coastal cities. (Yes, there are a few Teslas, Leafs, and Bolts scattered around the rest of the country, but not enough to penetrate mainstream consciousness.) It’s not a surprise that consumers who aren’t in those cities–a majority of consumers in the country–have no idea about the EV market and just guess based on their existing associations with “greenie cars.”

    Honestly, I’m more impressed by Chevy’s results than anybody else’s. When your brand is defined by trucks, Suburbans, and Corvettes, and previously had no “green” connotation whatsoever, getting half the country to realize that you’re a leading EV vendor is an accomplishment.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      “Honestly, I’m more impressed by Chevy’s results than anybody else’s.”

      You’re reminding me of Michael Schumacher’s least appealing interview tactic. There are two factors you’re not expressing in Chevy being perceived as an EV company:
      1. The wackos tarred them for killing the electric car after they scrapped the EV1s to protect the public
      2. You’re just fluffing them to congratulate yourself for paying for a fraction of your Bolt’s cost to society.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The EV1 wasn’t branded as a Chevy, and was leased through Saturn dealerships, but maybe in “alternative facts” world Chevy was somehow affected by it.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          GM is Chevrolet in more people’s minds than Saturn is. That you think anyone outside of a GM brand manager doesn’t connect the GM EV1 with the most common face of GM instead of an obsolete brand whose badge it never wore doesn’t make reality a place of alternative facts.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          The EV1 was specifically delevired via Saturn dealerships because first off, Saturn Dealerships were always vying with Lexus for the top dealership experience back then. Just as the EV1 was to represent the Future, the Saturn dealership model was to drag the rest of GM kicking and screaming into the future. Neither happened of course. Secondly, the sort of buyer the EV1 was marketed to wasn’t going to go near a Chevy or even a Cadillac dealer back then. Saturn at the time didn’t have the stigma they did.

          As such, no, I can’t see how very many folks would connect the car with Chevy. Most people probably think more about that “Who Killed the Electric Car” book than Chevrolet when it is mentioned.

          I actually got to drive one of these back in the day (I was a Saturn Detailer in the early to mid 90’s and we delivered one). It may as well have been a spaceship. It was a million miles from the crap J bodies of the day and the Gen 1 S-Series cars on our own lot.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I live in Huntsville Alabama and I see Teslas all the time.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Ditto here in Denver, which is nowhere near a coast. Then again, the original claim was made by someone who thinks everything he disagrees with – including EVs, apparently – is some kind of commie / fascist plot.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Denver is an honorary coastal city with the housing prices to match.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            And likewise, Huntsville is a pretty affluent city whose population has a pretty high proportion of formal education, i.e. two demographics that describe a lot of Telsa owners, as opposed to rural, lower income, blue collar, etc.

            Not a lot of Teslas running around other Alabama cities like Birmingham (well, maybe Mountain Brook and a few other particular boroughs), Montgomery, or Mobile.

            That’s not meant to be a judgmental statement about any demographic or city, it’s just an observation about HSV compared to Tesla owners and generally compared to other population centers.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        I live in a suburb west of Minneapolis, Tesla’s are a dime a dozen….see them everywhere.

        • 0 avatar
          tankinbeans

          Being within 30 miles of the showroom in Minnetonka will do that to you. I used to drive last that showroom every day and have gotten to the point where I don’t even register their presence.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Toyota isn’t just a hybrid company. They also know how bad EVs are because they’ve twice offered solid EVs in their RAV4 line, learning that there is no magic way of rehabilitating the hundred-year-obsolete-technology into anything other than a worst-case scenario to be inflicted by command economies.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      ToddAtlasF1

      Yea, the $50,000 RAV4 EV w/50 miles of EV range. Powered by Tesla. Enough range to play all 18 holes without stopping to recharge. Only 2,500 were built
      ———
      And the ……….?

      Are you sure there were 2?

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        The 1997 RAV4 EV had a 95 mile range, with a full charge achieved in five hours. What was the Leaf’s range a decade later? The RAV4 EV ran 95 miles on a NiMH battery pack that stood up to hundreds of thousands of miles of recharging. Unfortunately, the patent for NiMH batteries was bought by a party which only licenses its use for vehicles which are not charged with a plug.

        That’s why the second RAV4 EV of 2014 was a lesser Tesla fascism-compliance vehicle. I’ve seen one in central Virginia.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          So my quick Google-Fu says that in 2019 dollars that Rav-4 was 67,000 dollars. The 2013 Leaf, similarly adjusted was right at 30k. It had 84 miles of Range. That seems like a pretty significant cash outlay to get that extra 11 miles of range. As to durability, my kid’s 2015 with 40k will still do right at 80 miles (before it was laid up due to an accident anyway).

          But anyway, given the nearly 15 year head start Toyota had on Nissan, I am sure their 2019 EV’s can best the 226 miles one can get in a 36,000 dollar leaf today? Or not.

        • 0 avatar
          Peter Gazis

          ToddAtlasF1

          Keep reading.
          1st gen RAV4 EV
          1500 made between 1997 & 2003
          Sold mainly to business and as fleet vehicles
          27.4 KW battery pack
          5 hours to recharge
          Rated at 80 to 120 miles of EV range
          0 to 60 in 18 seconds when batteries fully charged
          Killed .1 day after California changed it’s zero emission requirement.
          Obviously this was a California compliance vehicle, and Toyota lost BIG
          MONEY on every one it built.

          After 2 attempts only 4,000 RAV4 EVs where built. Only a Toyota fanatic would call these serious efforts.
          (see also Coda, GEM, Detroit Electric, PolarisEV, Fisker Atlantic, Mitsubishi i-Mev, Fiat500EV)

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I think the Rav-4 EV should be held up for it’s one, true accomplishment in light of those numbers…It may well be the only car built in the last 30 years that could be beaten in a drag race by an 80’s Volvo 240 Diesel. Good Job.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “It may well be the only car built in the last 30 years that could be beaten in a drag race by an 80’s Volvo 240 Diesel.”

            This is one of those times I wish we could click “like” on TTAC B&B comments.

            That would be a drag race where I’d get popcorn. By that I mean I’d get up from my seat to go get popcorn, knowing that I could make it back to my seat in time to see the exciting conclusion.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      The first RAV4 EV experiment may have been the reason Toyota is taking so long to get on board the EV express. Besides the flaws already mentioned, those first RAV4 EVs used a specific ‘paddle’ style connector.

      Not only did it turn out to not be the eventual connector standard for Level 2, 240v charging (J-1772) but Costco got burned on this one, too, with stores that had the paddles found they mostly collected dust and were eventually removed (even though they could have easily been converted to J-1772).

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    Marketing is what makes awareness, and as noted, “Joe Consumer” doesn’t know what an EV really is, or a hybrid.

    Thus only 47% for Nissan, because non-enthusiasts (car and EV both) may never see a Leaf, if they don’t shop Nissans [because non-enthusiasts don’t spend time idly car browsing!], and don’t live in a city where EV-mania has hit.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I think Cadillac is a luxury car, but in fact it’s just a tarted up Chevy.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Fred

      I think Silverado High Country is a luxury vehicle
      While the Mercedes A-class; Lexus UX; BMW X1 & X2, Audi A3 & Q3 are not Luxury Vehicles!

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        I had a 2007 A3 and it was the nicest car I ever had. But, yea I’d tell people I drive an Audi, but when they saw the little car, no one was impressed. Some would warm up to it and my Danish co-workers said if I was in Denmark people would think I was rich. Alas, I was in Texas and small cars get little respect.

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    Tesla, Toyota, Chevy, Nissan, Honda. I’d say the consumers have a decent grasp on the situation. In terms of electric miles driven, I think those are the firms that have made the most impact.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      /facepalm

    • 0 avatar
      SlowMyke

      I’m not sure of the exact numbers Toyota has moved in terms of their limited EV offerings, but weren’t they all limited to a few select markets? I’d imagine Ford added far more EV miles driven in the US given their energi lineup consisted of 4 vehicles and was sold nation-wide.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Nissan behind Toyota? Interesting given that one of them built what was, for all intensive purposes the first 50 state mass market EV sold to Americans and the other one is Toyota. Not sure Why Honda is on this list. I mean the LaFerrari is a hybrid too so why not add them to the list.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      SPPP

      Honda?
      The Accord PHEV never made it to the U.S. in any volume. Only a couple of hundred where ever sold.
      And the current Civic/Clarity PHEV is Honda trying to copy the Chevy Volt.

  • avatar
    Groovypippin

    I sell Mazdas for a living on the West coast of Canada. EV’s here are big and a lot of clients through the door ask me if we sell an EV.

    My answer is always the same. “I sell the same number of EVs as Toyota, Honda, and Subaru combined – ZERO.”

    If nothing else, I get a kick out of the look of comical confusion on people’s faces. No, most people have little to no clue about the differences between a “Gasoline-Electric Hybrid” and an “EV”.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Wasn’t it recently reported that the Ford Fusion Hybrid is now outselling the Prius? That’s probably a measure of how far Prius sales have fallen, but it might show the value of hanging in there. It’s unfortunate, I think, how the Prius captured the public image of hybrid cars. Many of us couldn’t swallow its overstyling and underperformance.

    Once I learned what a C-Max was and what it could do — 70 mpg in my usage, with a 0-60 time of 8 seconds, 660_ miles per tank — a plug-in hybrid became an easy choice. Two years on, I’m in love with the car. But when I try to explain how it works to people, it’s clear that they have difficulty computing non-bianary choices: it’s EV or gas for them. Ford certainly isn’t helping, as they surround their dealerships with a stockage of F-150s and Explorers. In a different age, “Ford Beats Toyota” would be the theme of their ads. Maybe when the new Escape hybrid and plug-ins come out, they’ll share their secret?

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Wheatridger

      Between the FusionEnergi, C-MaxEnergi and crappy little Focus EV. Ford has sold over 100,000 plugins in the U.S.
      All 3 were really good vehicles when they came out. Now
      • The Focus EV is a short range EV with a hump in the cargo area limiting storage space.
      • C-MaxEnergi PHEVthe PriusPrime caught up to it. Offering similar EV range (23 miles) and better fuel economy when the engine is running. I think the C-Max still has more passenger room & Cargo space.
      • FusionEnergi is a REAL midsized car, with the same capabilities as the C-Max. Still a good choice for PHEV shoppers.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I had a leased C-Max Energi until 4 months ago, and the Prius Prime is really a different sort of product.

        The C-Max is better equipped, more premium feeling, much faster, and more roomy for passengers (not cargo, as the battery shrinks the cargo hold).

        The Prius is more efficient with both electricity and gas, cheaper (at least by MSRP), much slower, and probably more durable.

        They’re both plug-in hybrids, but I doubt they would appeal to the same buyer.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      Isn’t Ford completely abandoning the US car market, with the sole exceptions being the Mustang and a hotrod version of the Euro Focus?

      I guess the Fusion Hybrid outselling the Prius just wasn’t enough to keep it around. A pity since the Fusion Hybrid (or the PHEV Energi version) seemed like a decent enough, fuel-efficient, mid-size sedan.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Toyota fans typically have no clue or interest as to what is actually going on under the hood so I am not at all shocked. It could be some mice on a wheel, a nuclear reactor, or anything in between and they wouldn’t know or care.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      And we all know that 52% of people polled were Toyota owners, right? In other news, the first cars to commonly produce over a thousand horsepower on the street were Toyota Supras, driven by guys who had no idea what was under their hoods.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        And that would be what, like 20 years ago? Just like the rest of Toyota, resting on their past. But yes, those Supra’s were awesome but those owners have moved on after Toyota left them with nothing for 20 plus years. But still, given the awesomeness that was the Mk IV Supra I’m sure Toyota built on all of that engineering and came up with something amazing for the Mk V. No way they would insult that fanbase by rebadging a BMW, right? That’s crazy talk. And man, that AE-86 Celica was great too…not likke they’d screw that up. Well at least the Toyota Faithful still have the MR-2. Or not.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        In 90’s, Toyota pushed the envelope and fundamentally changed what people could expect at a given price point performance wise (The Supra), and with respect to luxury (The LS400). These cars specifically but others in their lineup as well to a lesser degree were groundbreaking in that they bested their competition at a lower price point and brought legendary reliability to the table.

        But those days are over. Modern Toyotas simply aren’t class leading to anyone except the Consumer Reports crowd. Boomer Buicks.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “no clue or interest as to what is actually going on under the hood”

      A lot of former Japan-built Toyota Camry owners have voted with their feet and their wallet because they rejected the North American-built Camry as cheapified, de-contented and no better than their Detroit counterparts using the same North American parts suppliers (which is not a compliment).

      My best friend stepped up to a 2015 Avalon Limited, but I think he is the exception, not the norm.

      And he does care about that 3.5L V6 under the hood. It’s bigger, brawnier, gutsier but more refined and smoother than the 2.5L 24V V6 he had in his Japan-built 1989 Camry.

      And now he’s looking to buy a Silverado CrewCab Shortbed with Power Driver Seat, in Silver Ice Metallic, to replace the 1993 S-10 he parted out.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        @HDC, so is that the threshold for Toyota owners caring about what’s under the hood? “Wow, this V6 is way quicker than the one that was in my 30 year old car”.

        And curious, if he has tasted that “Toyota goodness”, why the Chevy? Toyota still makes a fullsized pickup last I checked.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Art, I believe the whole Toyota-loyalty syndrome is more than a simple frame-of-mind.

          I believe it to be a lifestyle choice since the vast majority of Toyota loyalists drove something else before switching to Toyota.

          I can only speak for myself here but I was an Oldsmobile fan, then a Towncar fan, and I drove Silverado, F150, and one lonely ’96 RAM Cummins.

          All that changed in 2008 when my wife wanted a new Japan-built Highlander to replace her Towncar. Oh, wadda feelin’. Toyota! Punch it!

          Then she had a mental aberration and fell in love with a 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee. It has happened to the best of us. I bought her one – ended up giving it to our grand daughter when she got married in June 2015.

          Since then my wife has regained her senses and the Sequoia is at its rightful place at the top of the fave list.

          The exact Chevy truck my best friend is looking for is to satisfy his wife’s wishes.

          She saw one in the Walmart parking lot, liked it, and suggested they should buy a 2019 or 2020 version to replace the 1993 S-10 he parted out.

          I’ve been working on him to buy a Tundra instead, and he wants to but he is between a rock and a hard place because, like me, he wants to give his wife of half a century anything and everything they could not afford while he was a young airman, struggling to make the money last the whole month.

          He’s such a laid-back, easy-going person who doesn’t care what he drives as long as it is functional and serves the purpose; four doors to replace their sedan, and a bed to carry stuff in.

          He told me, “I’d rather buy something that Sue wants because she will outlive me and she will have to sell that truck, or keep it for herself when I kick off. We’re replacing two vehicles, (the S10 and the Camry), and she can have whatever she likes.”

          The only must-haves are a Power Driver seat, because Sue is 5’1″ and weighs all of 106 pounds, and running-boards/side-steps to make it easier for her to get in/out of the truck.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @HDC, I think Toyota makes a very reliable product. If someone’s criteria is that they absolutely priortize reliability over all else then I’d steer them towards a Toyota in 99 percent of cases.

            however there are other things people consider. If any of those other things involve even the slightest inkling of entusiasm towards driving than there is the distinct possibility they will be happy with the occasional warranty trip to the dealership. Even back during “Peak Toyota” back in the 90’s I know I’d have been happier with an E36 BMW and any headaches I may have had. Most cars (there are a few notable exceptions like the Powershift) deliver plenty of reliability for your average buyer.

            But “Peak Toyota” is a thing of the past. They just got Car Play and Android Auto when other makers have been reliably offering it for years and their infotainment is universally penned as awful when even FCA gets this right. They are bland. Anything that requires any reall technological pushing of the envelope since the LF-A has been outsourced. They are outclassed in nearly every segment EXCEPT for being reliable. I don’t get it. I’d rather live with a little “Personality” than drive a Maytag every day. But I like cars and driving.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Just like the myth of Toyoduh quality, the myth that Toyoduh is an EV company exists. I’d contend that the last twenty years of Toyoduh efforts have been far more problematic than the twenty years before that when they built old technology products that were well screwed together even though they rusted into oblivion. Current Toyoduhs are resting on their reputation and not on the reality of substance. Their pickup trucks have frame rail rusting issues that could allow the entire leaf spring assemblies to separate from the frame; and then there are other quality issues that have crept in as Toyoduh has adopted more technology. Prius models have issues with their ICE components that cause them to burn oil at a higher than average rate, for example.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      First: Tim, where’s our *duh moderation filter?

      Second: All of this might be news to the cab drivers in America’s big cities, who have overwhelmingly shifted from the defunct Panthers to Toyota hybrids because of durability, high uptime, and low cost of operation in intense service. It’s routine around here to see a Prius with 400k block-by-block miles.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        “Tim, where’s our *duh moderation filter?”

        Just in case you have been here for less than a week, this is the site that coined the phrases “Camcord” and “MK-Taurus” among others so I’m not sure why “Honduh or Toyoduh” would be worthy of filtering. That sort of snark has been in these comments since the Farago days.

        Or do you just want stuff that offends your sensibilities banned?

      • 0 avatar
        Peter Gazis

        dal20402

        Around here it is common to see a a line of cabs waiting at low cost cash only repair shops. With a number of Camrys & Priuses in back. In various stages of being parted out.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    These results sound about right.

    Ease of ownership is king for consumers, and range anxiety is real. Telling consumers what they need in an EV is a fool’s errand, so it’s much better to tell them what they get instead. As a shadetree mechanic, I thought Nissan’s old ad for the Leaf was compelling, in which they showed hundreds of parts laid out on a floor that the car didn’t have in it.

    One success along these lines is the Tesla Supercharger network, which builds confidence for long-distance EV drives.

    As for brand equity, it is slowly built, and often misplaced. Consumers would be shocked to know that Tesla is outselling Cadillac and Lincoln, for example, probably because Tesla doesn’t run ads.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “Telling consumers what they need in an EV is a fool’s errand, so it’s much better to tell them what they get instead.”

      Truth.

      Unfortunately a lot of them will have to overpay for 250-mile EVs, and actually use them for some time in service, before they fully understand that there is a sweet spot around 150 miles for an awful lot of uses, especially if there is another longer-range or ICE car in the household. The initial gaggle of 80-mile compliance cars really didn’t help with this because 80 miles really is too short under a lot of real-world conditions.

    • 0 avatar
      raynla

      And that’s whats even more amazing about Tesla!
      It’s not only an American car company but they run 0 ads!
      No price negotiations, no employee discounts.
      It’s just here is the car, like it or leave it.
      Trust me you will like it.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    This survey has no relevance in my part of the world since there is no mention of Renault or Mitsubishi.

  • avatar
    raynla

    Before I drove a Tesla and a Nissan Leaf I owned 2 Toyota 4 Runners.


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