By on August 31, 2019

Image: Porsche AG

Think of it as a swan song for gasoline propulsion, not the Macan itself. For the 2020 model year, the hottest version of Porsche’s entry-level ute returns with more power and less displacement on tap, but the Macan Turbo sings its siren song against a funeral dirge backdrop.

This vehicle is a get-one-while-you-still-can proposition.

While the Macan saw a mid-cycle refresh this year, updates to the Macan Turbo were a longer time coming. This week, Porsche announced the twin-turbo 3.6-liter V6 that once powered the hot ute is gone, replaced by a 2.9-liter unit with similar breathing characteristics and a power boost you’ll only be able to appreciate after leaving the line.

The Macan Turbo now makes 434 horsepower, up from its predecessor’s 400 ponies. Torque actually drops a single foot-pound, from 406 lb-ft to 405, but 0-60 mph in 4.1 seconds isn’t likely to cause anyone to lose sleep over that missing lb-ft. All of that newfound power makes its way to each of the model’s 20-inch wheels via a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic, and standard adaptive damping ensures the Macan stays level, especially when you’re away from the prying eyes of the local constabulary. Top speed is now 167 mph, which almost no owner will ever reach. God help them and their license if they do.

Image: Porsche AG

Completing the package is an updated fascia, front and back, as well as a roof spoiler. Should you feel the need to spend more money than absolutely necessary (this thing starts at  $84,950‬ after destination), Porsche has a wish list waiting: ceramic brakes and adjustable air suspension is on offer. You won’t have to pay extra for the standard 10.9-inch touchscreen.

While the changes coming to the Macan Turbo make it a better car, fans might not like what comes next. The Macan line is expected to go fully electric early next decade, as per an earlier announcement from Porsche.

“The Supervisory Board of Porsche AG has decided to manufacture the next generation of the Macan as a fully electric series,” the company stated in February. “This will be the first all-electric compact SUV from Porsche, and is due to roll off the assembly line at the start of the next decade.”

As best as anyone can figure, the next-generation, gas-free Macan will appear in 2021 as a 2022 model. Once free of its internal combustion restraints, the Macan, riding on Premium Platform Electric architecture co-developed with Audi, will borrow the 800V charging system found in the upcoming Taycan EV and its Cross Turismo crossover/wagon sibling.

Image: Porsche AG

[Image: Porsche AG]

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38 Comments on “Porsche Macan Turbo Grows Even Hotter for 2020, Just in Time for It All to End...”


  • avatar
    dwford

    I don’t think anyone would mind if every crossover went full electric. The typical crossover buyer doesn’t buy it for the vroom vroom sounds it makes. Leave the gas engines and a few manual transmissions to the cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Noble713

      Anyone even *thinking* about buying a Macan Turbo is already not a “typical crossover buyer”. Shame to see this car get put out to pasture. It seemed like a good compromise for a wealthy guy who wants something exhilarating but still capable of pulling double-duty as an urban family vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      apl

      I and many others do not want a full electric or hybrid crossover vehicle. We want our crossovers with only an internal combustion engine.

      • 0 avatar

        I think ICE is too boring and depends on availability of highly refined petroleum, which in event of war will not be available for civilians. I want my crossover to have steam engine which is fun to drive, makes great sound and works from anything that burns.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        But you and many others most likely aren’t the buyers for Macans… Porsche buyers are Tesla buyers these days. And for them, an electric Macan may be just the ticket.

        • 0 avatar
          namesakeone

          …until it becomes time to replace the battery. Is that going to be a several-thousand-dollar proposition? (See the August 5 article in TTAC about battery refurbishment and the Nissan Leaf, among others.)

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            I’d take a battery replacement over a Porsche IMS failure repair bill any day.

            Third parties are starting to get into the replacement battery business. That’s probably the market where the muffler, oil change, and transmission companies will head. The beauty of a battery replacement in an EV is that your drive train will be just as reliable as when it was new. On an ICE, you start a death by a thousand cuts process when parts begin to fail.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Sure, the same way (and usually at about the same point in the lifespan) as replacing an automatic transmission in a modern ICE car is a several-thousand-dollar proposition.

          • 0 avatar
            Snooder

            Dude, it’s a Porsche crossover. Nobody is keeping it past the warranty.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            I know right? It cost a fortune to replace a regular battery in a Porsche now!

    • 0 avatar
      Snooder

      Well, for eight now, electric is too expensive for most crossovers.

      But for the Macan and other luxury crossovers, it’s perfect. Pretty much eliminates all the downsides of EV ownership, cause the typical owner has a house, and probably a second car anyway. And they dont give a fuck about that rumbling V8 sound anyway.

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    Beautiful SUV and stunning color.

    • 0 avatar

      Do Germans even buy these cars? Isn’t there social shaming going on in Europe in general?

      • 0 avatar
        ThomasSchiffer

        Inside,

        Yes, we do. SUVs have become very popular in Germany and I like them. But most are sold with Diesel engines, especially the large SUVs.

      • 0 avatar
        ThomasSchiffer

        Inside,

        Yes, we do. SUVs have become very popular in Germany and I like them. But most are sold with Diesel engines, especially the large SUVs.

        • 0 avatar

          No, I did not mean SUVs, I meant owning expensive cars like Porsche or Bentley, RR or S class. Is it considered shameful flaunting wealth in front of public opinion. Like new rich do to prove whatever they need to prove.

          • 0 avatar
            ThomasSchiffer

            @Inside,

            Yes, flaunting your wealth is frowned upon here. There is a popular word in Germany known as Sozialneid. This translates into English a ‘social jealousy’. It is hard to believe but many Germans are very envious and upset about what type of cars their fellow countrymen drive.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “many Germans are very envious and upset about what type of cars their fellow countrymen drive.”

            My wife and I each have many German relatives in Germany, but those relatives sure own a lot of property in the US, including cars, that their German neighbors know nothing about, except that they spend a lot of time on ‘vacation’, someplace.

            When the German Luftwaffe was stationed in my area, the parents of those military people bought vacation homes in this area, to include El Paso, TX, Las Cruces, NM, Cloudcroft, NM, and a host of other mountainous ski-country locations nearby.

            The Luftwaffe has gone home now, after many years, but the German tourists still come to vacation here.

          • 0 avatar
            ThomasSchiffer

            @highdesertcat

            That is how we live in Germany, in partial secrecy of what we drive. And now with the climate change hysteria SUV drivers in particular are being targeted by these FFF kids. Last week a sticker was posted on my Mercedes SUV which essentially insulted me for buying and driving such a vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        Germans love their “combis”, which is what they call wagons. I swear, 90% of the cars in Germany are combis.

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      SUV? That’s a crossover, with the ground clearance and gearing to stride over a robust hummock of grass or mow down dandelions. A Grand Cherokee is an SUV with high/low transfer case if optioned. So is a Range Rover and defintely a Wrangler. These pretend tough guy cars are hatchbacks on (very minor) stilts. The BMW X2 ditches all pretense of even being a crossover, and the X7 looks like a mini school bus with attitude and a missing lower step for kiddies to board.

      I’ve noticed the Europeans call even something as pathetic as a wobbly Ford Ecosport an SUV. Since the term was first used in North America, something seems to have been lost in the translation across the pond of what an actual SUV is. Of course, BMW calls their crossovers Sports Activity Vehicles just to be completely out of touch. They had to call them something because no BMW can be called an SUV.

      The original almost 3 tonne lard of a Porsche Cayenne and VW Touareg with two-speed transfer box and ground clearance, I would admit to the SUV club. The second gen ditched the SUV credentials and became a porky crossover with a badge and a flash engine.

      The Macan is a souped up Audi Q5 with better road suspension. Any car up to at least the early 1980s had the ground clearance of the Porsche Maclown. Nice car, though as a car, that Macan.

    • 0 avatar
      millmech

      OldeValiant Toxicwaste green, metallic

  • avatar
    Roader

    “Think of it as a swan song for gasoline propulsion.”

    Or a swan song for this particular Porsche model if it goes all-electric. Gasoline propulsion will power the vast majority of automobiles for decades. Yeah, they might have an electric motor in between the gas engine and the wheels, but they’ll still be powered by gasoline.

    Besides, electric cars in the US are powered mostly by natural gas, coal, and nuclear:

    https://afdc.energy.gov/vehicles/electric_emissions.html

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @Roader: That data is from a ten-year-old report. Ten years old. Cheap natural gas has wiped out a lot of coal plants in that time. Where I live, there are no coal plants, but I’m not sure what the number is nationally these days.

      • 0 avatar
        Roader

        Huh. I didn’t see any date on that US Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center website. Here’s a US Energy Administration page that’s dated 2018:

        https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=427&t=3

        Natgas 35.1%
        Coal 27.4%
        Nuclear 19.3%

        My calculator shows 82% from those three sources.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @roader: Yes, those numbers are correct and current. But, that’s on a national basis. Individual areas are different. You have to look at areas where high numbers of EVs are sold.

          California electricity is 0% coal, 36.3 NatGas, 52.7% renewable (I’m surprised it’s that high), and 10.9 nuke. The 2017 data for Massachusetts is inaccurate since lots of changes have occurred since then. Massachusetts is 0% coal now, The Plymouth Nuclear plant shut down this year and I don’t know how much we get from NH. I saw a figure of 67% natural gas. Offshore wind will start gaining a share once it’s approved.

          So, maybe EVs are mostly powered by Natural Gas, but if coal isn’t being used or isn’t heavily used in states with large numbers of EVs, you have to leave coal out of the list of power sources.

          I’d look closer into the data, but I just don’t have time. Also remember, cars last a number of years and as time goes on, the energy sources for EVs can be improved. Coal is on it’s way out for economic reasons and renewables are making gains. On the nuclear front, NuScale Power’s work on SMR plants is interesting and could play a role.

          • 0 avatar
            Roader

            CA gets 4% of its electricity from coal, 34% from NatGas. No, those coal plants aren’t in CA but the power is imported from the Intermountain Power Project in Utah, the San Juan plant in New Mexico and the Navajo plant in Arizona. Those three coal power plants provide SoCal with about 50% of its power.

            https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2018/07/03/california-breakdown-of-electricity-imports-upholds-statess-clean-reputation/

  • avatar
    karonetwentyc

    And, once again, a major manufacturer misses the mark. When, oh when, will they realise that the car- (and crossover-) buying public don’t want electric vehicles?

    Gazogenes are the future, as proven by the Citroën Traction Avant and other pre-WWII vehicles. The technology is mature, and with a bit of modernisation could become the ultimate in sustainable-fuel transport.

    Proof: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_d7Xb3L5Jo

  • avatar
    Pnm01

    Is this the Audi RS5 engine?

  • avatar
    AA610

    My dad bought the Macan S two years ago. Traded in his Boxster for it, as he felt he was getting old for his car (low to the ground, a little too loud). It’s a nice compromise for him.

  • avatar
    Alasdair

    This is never going to happen. The Macan will have a combustion engine for many years to come, for the simple reason that the Macan is way too profitable to axe. Porsche is just indulging in a bit of virtue signalling, which will be forgotten as early as next week.

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